Loading…
This event has ended. Visit the official site or create your own event on Sched.
Welcome to the Official Schedule for RightsCon 2019, the world’s leading summit on human rights in the digital age.

Together at RightsCon Tunis, our first summit hosted in the Middle East and North Africa, more than 2500 expert practitioners will come together across over 400 sessions to shape, contribute to, and drive forward the global agenda for the future of our human rights.

Important note: Whether you’re a session organizer, speaker, or participant, you’ll need to login to Sched or create an account in order to get the most out of the program (including creating a profile and building your own customized RightsCon schedule).

Be sure to get your ticket to RightsCon first. You can visit rightscon.org for more information.

RightsCon is brought to you by Access Now.

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Intersectionality on the Internet: Diversity and Representation [clear filter]
Wednesday, June 12
 

9:00am

Fat Futures: On Reimagining Flesh and Possibility
The goal of Fat Futures is to invite folks of all identities and backgrounds into an introductory workshop on fat bodies, fat oppression, and the relationship to technology. We will help develop individual and organizational practices for humanizing, including, and cultivating accessibility around fat bodies; specifically addressing how violence shows up for fat folks and how fat oppression in physical spaces shows up within digital spaces.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Oya 3 (Laico)

9:00am

The big dataset in the sky: challenging geographies of discrimination
An interactive discussion on challenging “geographies of discrimination” that will bring a perspective from the “Global South” to ,e.g., (1) international trade and investment agreements negotiations, (2) the Sustainable Development Goals implementation, (3) the United Nations and regional human rights mechanisms work, and (4) ensuring accountability to the Global South for decision-making and governance of digital technologies. Digital technologies can contribute to the realization of human rights, including the right to development. They also present great challenges by building a brave new world and a highly unequal one. Digital divides and closing gaps can be addressed in terms of access to and affordability of digital technologies and platforms in developing countries. However, “the big data divide” is a far larger gap. This is the divide between those who generate data and those who collect, store and use data, the former excluded from access to data, expertise and processing power, power which is increasingly opaque, indecipherable and too vast. This is not a question of privacy or protection alone, but one of discrimination and powerlessness. The session will debate challenges to closing geographic digital divides, in what is a highly uneven, under-regulated playing field rife in money, profits and big monopolies.

Moderators
avatar for Diego Valadares

Diego Valadares

Human Rights Officer, UN Human Rights
I work in the Right to Development Section of UN Human Rights. I hold a LLM in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (Geneva Academy) and I am currently writing a PhD thesis on Political Science (Federal University of Minas Gerais).

Speakers
avatar for Naman Aggarwal

Naman Aggarwal

Asia Policy Associate, Access Now
avatar for J. Carlos Lara

J. Carlos Lara

Director - Public Policy, Derechos Digitales
Internet lover, coffee lover, live music lover, bacon lover, dog lover, cat lover, internet hater.
avatar for Arthur Gwagwa

Arthur Gwagwa

Senior Research Fellow, Strathmore University (CIPIT)
Arthur is currently working on a project funded by the Open Technology Fund. The project will detect, document, and analyze current and emerging cyber threats with a long term goal to mitigate their impact on users at risk in specific Sub-Saharan African countries especially around... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 3 (Laico)

10:30am

Solve My Problem: Indigenous Data Sovereignty
RightsCon Solve My Problem sessions will provide an opportunity for representatives from diverse stakeholder groups and regions to come together around a defined problem within the human rights and technology space and devise strategies, actions, and solutions. The identified problem is either associated with one of the major tracks in the RightsCon program or is a linking issue that requires different sets of skills to be addressed.

Open data principles are currently in contradiction to IDS principles that protect Indigenous and ethnic minority rights to data ownership and sovereignty. Moreover, several data initiatives around the world are creating projects around Indigenous data without considering the principles of IDS.

Failure to consider IDS principles will deepen inequities, devalue Indigenous knowledge and expertise, and perpetuate colonial mentalities and infrastructures.

Moderators
avatar for Alejandro Mayoral Banos

Alejandro Mayoral Banos

Executive Director, Indigenous Friends Association
Alejandro Mayoral Banos is an Indigenous activist and Ph.D.Candidate, who is currently working with organizations in Canada and Mexico deploying participatory and community-driven ICT projects by/with/for Indigenous peoples. He is the creator and founder of the Indigenous Friends... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Justin Wiebe

Justin Wiebe

Program Manager, Mastercard Foundation
Justin Wiebe is Michif (Métis) from Saskatoon in Treaty 6 and Métis Territory, and currently lives in Toronto in territories covered by the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant. Justin is passionate about inclusive city-building that centers reconciliation, youth leadership... Read More →
avatar for Pyrou Chung

Pyrou Chung

Senior Adviser, Ewmi Open Development Initiative
I am the Senior Advisor at the Open Development Initiative (ODI) a project of the East West Management Institute (EWMI) and manage their natural resource, land and data initiatives in Southeast Asia. I have expertise in ecology and sustainable development and my work is focused in... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
El Jem (Laico)

12:00pm

The Digital Language Divide: Why Prioritizing Underrepresented Languages Matters.
The Internet is a powerful catalyst for social change, bringing new opportunities for sharing information and connecting social movements across continents. Access to these resources is a key determinant to socioeconomic opportunities, but many communities are met with constant language barriers as they navigate the Internet -- limiting the scope of the information available to them. As policymakers continue to address the growing digital divide, special attention must be paid to underrepresented language users who are continually relegated to the peripheries of the Internet. What obstacles do underrepresented language communities face as a result of their online exclusion? And what role can policymakers, developers, and activists play to bring linguistic diversity to the forefront? Our panel discussion brings together key stakeholders to shed light on the challenges they face, both as Internet users and as individuals working to promote their languages online. The session will discuss issues from digital security risks and economic obstacles to technical challenges when incorporating languages with no script and creating keyboards with new font types. We will also discuss the ways that communities are successfully leveraging technology to preserve and promote language.

Moderators
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Founder & Director, Localization Lab
Dragana Kaurin is a human rights researcher and ethnographer working at the intersection of technology, human rights and migration. She is the founder and executive director of Localization Lab, a non-profit organization that works on technology adoption with local communities, research... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Surman

Mark Surman

Executive Director, Mozilla Foundation
The web is one of our most valuable public resources — it’s Mark Surman’s job to protect it. Mark serves as Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation, a global community that does everything from making Firefox to taking stands on issues like online privacy. Mark’s biggest... Read More →
avatar for Nwachukwu Egbunike

Nwachukwu Egbunike

Community Manager Sub-Saharan Africa, Global Voices
My scholarly and journalist writings revolves around social media, politics/ political participation, online free speech and ethnicity. I am the author of "Hashtags: social media, politics and ethnicity in Nigeria".
avatar for Kristen Tcherneshoff

Kristen Tcherneshoff

Director of Community, Wikitongues
kristen@wikitongues.orgKristen Tcherneshoff is the Director of Community at Wikitongues, where she works alongside more than 1,500 volunteers and language activists from around the world. With a background in law and disability rights, her interests lie in language activism and sign... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Adean (Palais)

1:00pm

Digital Rights Monopoly
The Digital Rights Monopoly session is an innovative approach towards raising awareness among the session participants about some of the digital rights issues which are faced by youth from various underrepresented regions globally. One of the greatest challenges towards solving digital and human rights issues online is that most users are often unaware of the importance of digital rights and its role in the sustainability of a healthy internet. In our version of the monopoly game, we aim to highlight some of these issues and offer a fun method for internet users to learn about them.

Moderators
avatar for Uffa Modey

Uffa Modey

Co Founder, Digital Grassroots

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Hannibal (Laico)

1:00pm

Freedom of expression for LGBT, HIV, and gender equality activists in Ukraine
During the session will be presented the survey and analytical report 'Freedom of expression online for LGBT, HIV and gender equality activists' prepared by NGO Fulcrum UA in September 2018 under suppport of Counterpart International (200 respondents, distribution by gender: women, men, non-binary people, distribution by sphere of activism: LGBT, HIV, gender equality). Also, audience will be involved in discussion about various forms of cyberbullying against activists (insults, threats, intimidaton, blocking online activity etc.), ways to deal with them, what institutions to report cases of cyberbullying and other human rights violations online, methods to prevent cyberbullying (through educational activities etc), as well as Internet security, safe and responsible online behaviour for activists. This session is for: LGBT+, HIV, gender equality activists, human rights activists in general, lawyers, administrators of online platforms, online rights researchers, representatives of NGOs and international organizations, policy makers

Moderators
avatar for Yana Tovpeko

Yana Tovpeko

Communications manager, NGO Fulcrum UA
Yana is an human rights activist from Ukraine, currently working as a communications manager at NGO Fulcrum UA. Yana defended the first PhD thesis in Ukraine raising the issue of discrimination against LGBT people in the legal context (2017). Former Human Rights Education intern at... Read More →

Speakers
TL

Tymur Levchuk

Founder, CEO, NGO Fulcurm UA
HR, LGBT+, SDGs expert.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Oya 2 (Laico)

1:00pm

Lightning Talks: Questioning access and accountability
How to effectively use the experience and expertise of former extremists and academics to disrupt terrorist recruitment (CENTRI)

With academic knowledge, tech, and media at our disposal how can we best architect a viable alternative to extremist narratives? Terrorists' recruitment tactics follow a simple pattern whether that be white supremacism or Islamist terror. They distort, play on fear, and encourage hatred of the other. Drawing on knowledge of formers and academics together with the help of tech and media organisations, it is possible to organise grassroots activities that will be an effective antidote to extremist narratives.

The Groundswell Project has been devised to do exactly that using Hadiya Masieh’s 22 years of experience and insight. She was part of a radical Islamist group for 10 years and has spent over a decade pulling young women out of and away from Al Qaidah/Daesh. The key has been to bring around the table media, tech, academics and activist and devising similar tactics extremist use to spread their rhetoric. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel, everything we need to challenge this at its roots is right in-front of us. It’s necessary however to be practical, passionate, creative, and to join forces with others to effectively push back against extremism and create an environment that does not provide fertile ground for extremists to grow in numbers and recruit new people to aid their cause. Her talk will be on how to practically do this.

Speaker: Hadiya Masieh


Barricades to Justice (Media Matters for Democracy)

Description: The session introduces a legal aid program our organization has initiated in Pakistan that aims to provide journalists and activists with free legal assistance. It will start by highlighting the need for this program, in which we plan to explain the attacks on media persons for voicing their dissent in the country. Followed by this, the speaker will give a very brief overview of the cases that have been or decided by the Courts relating to freedom of expression, and how these cases have impacted the rights of people. A few major cases in this regards pertain to network shutdowns and connectivity. The session will then highlight the challenges faced by lawyers and media persons when approaching the courts to guarantee freedom of digital expression. By engaging in a discussion on this, the ultimate goal of the session would then be to collect feedback from the legal experts and activists from other countries/ communities, on legal methods that have to be adopted and how to combat the challenges, by using the law, and how to better protect the right to free speech in an online space.

Speaker: Salwa Sameer Rana

Intellectual Property and Sacred Reciprocity at the Frontiers of Psychedelic Medicine (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies - MAPS)

Description: If a hot Silicon Valley startup develops a new mental health treatment by applying machine learning to a publicly available scientific database, what legal or ethical obligations does it have to the indigenous ayahuasca shamans whose plant medicine expertise made that database possible? This scenario may seem fanciful, but it raises important questions that affect real people. The “Psychedelic Renaissance” is here, and questions like this – about ownership, access, and practicality – remain. Existing international frameworks for protecting indigenous genetic resources and traditional knowledge were created at a time when drug development often required transferring physical samples across borders. The international community is still grappling with whether and how such frameworks apply to synthetic biology, just as artificial intelligence is poised to exponentially accelerate the pace of drug development. The session will open with a short, high level overview of relevant international frameworks (including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Nagoya Protocol, and ongoing negotiations at the World Intellectual Property Organization). Then we will shift to an interactive discussion that will explore the ethics of legalizing and commercializing psychedelic plant medicines – like psilocybin, ayahuasca, and even cannabis – and principles for equitably sharing the benefits of indigenous knowledge.

Speaker: Ismail Ali

Breaking Down the Prison Walls: Digital Community Platforms for Access to Justice (International Bridges to Justice)

Description: 3 million people around the world languish in pre-trial detention without access to a lawyer and at risk of torture. Can the global movement for access to justice harness technology to connect legal defenders and put a stop to these human rights abuses? Karen Tse’s lightning talk will tackle this question by highlighting the power of digital community platforms to create sustainable and long-lasting impact on a broad scale. She will share IBJ's journey towards the creation of IBJ’s JusticeHub (a digital platform for accessing justice), discuss its core functionalities and spark a conversation on the impact of digital community platforms on the work of lawyers and human rights advocates across thematic spheres. IBJ’s JusticeHub will serve as a “work forum” and “strategic convener” to connect the global legal defender community. This community currently lacks a participatory online space. IBJ believes technology can overcome this coordination problem. Join Karen to hear how NGOs can bring technology and justice together to move towards a world free from torture and other abuses.

Speaker: Karen Tse

Speakers
avatar for Hadiya Masieh

Hadiya Masieh

Founder and CEO, Groundswell Project
Hadiya Masieh is an expert consultant in the area of community cohesion, interfaith relations, counter extremism, and women’s involvement in extremism and radicalisation. Her experience spans over 22 years. She has been a counter extremism consultant for various Governments and... Read More →
avatar for Karen Tse

Karen Tse

Founder & CEO, International Bridges to Justice
Karen founded International Bridges to Justice in 2000 to promote systemic global change in the administration of criminal justice. A former public defender, Karen first developed her interest in the cross section of criminal law and human rights as a Thomas J. Watson Fellow in 1986... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

2:15pm

Busting Out of the Echo Chamber: an inclusive approach to build diverse online communities and generate constructive conversations between polarized youth
In this interactive session we will gather input on how to create more and better civic spaces. We will discuss our inclusive approach for online community building in restrictive settings, including the challenges of putting this approach into practice. We will gather suggestions to improve our approach and supporting strategies. We will focus on lessons learned and best practices for creating: • Inclusive Teams: Using examples from the Libya and DRC, we will discuss the challenges of building diverse and inclusive teams. • Inclusive Content and Communities: Using examples from DRC, Burundi and Libya, we will describe our media and engagement strategies to create safe spaces where young people from different backgrounds can come together in ways often impossible in the offline space. • Inclusive Partnerships: How to engage the broadest spectrum of stakeholders? Different organisations will discuss how they use a multi-stakeholder approach to be more inclusive. • Inclusive Tech: Faster, cheaper internet is one way to make platforms more inclusive but often beyond our control. We will discuss how we optimise our platforms to make them more accessible and invite others to discuss their solutions to this issue.

Moderators
avatar for Nigel Pedlingham

Nigel Pedlingham

Programme Manager Citizens' Voice, RNW Media
Nigel is Programme Manager of Citizens' Voice at the Netherlands based INGO RNW Media.RNW Media uses media for change. With innovative approaches to building digital media platforms and large scale inclusive digital communities RNW Media enables young people to make informed choices... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael J. Oghia

Michael J. Oghia

Advocacy & Engagement Manager, Global Forum for Media Development
Co-moderator, PL 4
avatar for Michele Ernsting

Michele Ernsting

Director Programme Dev., RNW Media
Digital communities, alternative civic space, youth inclusion, love, sex & relationships, data for advocacy and honey bees.
avatar for Pavithra Ram

Pavithra Ram

Content Strategist, RNW Media
Pavi is an international development specialist focused on the intersection of internet, media and social change. Currently a strategist in RNW Media’s social inclusion program- Citizens’ Voice, she helps build digital communities and create alternate/digital civic spaces in countries... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Carthage 2 (Laico)

2:15pm

3:45pm

Hacking Hackathons with a feminist perspective
Traditional hackathons have many risks: they encourage competition and not collaboration, they are oriented to expert participants in technology, they are a hotbed of ideas that are not followed up and do not arouse any critical analysis towards technology. And in addition, a very small number of women and a diverse population always participate as an indigenous, rural population, with a disability, Afro-descendant, etc. However, the challenge of developing a proposal in an intensive period is something that appeals mainly to young people. Since 2014, Sulá Batsú has developed hackathons from a feminist approach aimed at women from all over the Central American territory and from all rural, border, indigenous, afro, and other contexts. This seeks to break with all the logic behind the hackathons, but this device is used as an instance of critical analysis of technology and creation of technological proposals as a way to give voice to all women through technology. We propose it as a workshop because we want participants to design their own female hackathons in our workshop with our methodological approach.

Moderators
Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Adean (Palais)
 
Thursday, June 13
 

9:00am

Creative Ways to Support Diverse Tool Teams
Many of the most commonly used privacy and security tools are created and maintained by notoriously small, homogeneous, and primarily Western individuals/teams. Some are unable to officially register or cannot receive funding due to other professional commitments. Others are unable to accept U.S. government funding. These limitations, among others, make it difficult for tool teams to diversify and sustain themselves long-term. During this session, tool teams will gather with donors and discuss current limitations and explore creative solutions to address their needs. The meetup will be lead by Internews’ Global Technology team, which has many years’ experience working with open source tool teams. Over the years, the team has developed innovative ways to provide support to non-traditional tool teams that do not have the organizational or team structure to absorb funding. Other attendees at this session will include open source tool team representatives that have previously received support despite limitations, or others that have been unable to receive support previously given their constraints. Additionally, organizations providing support (financial or otherwise) to tool teams will be invited to share their experiences and any creative solutions they have used in non-traditional situations.

Moderators
Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Hannibal (Laico)

9:00am

Granny & the Robots: Sex, violence and care - Why human rights matter
Please join us for a special talk with the United Nations Independent Expert on the rights of older persons on her work on robots and assistive technology. In the context of ageing societies, lack of health professionals and economic constraints, the use of assistive devices and robotics is increasingly seen as a cost-effective solution to make health care systems sustainable. The United Nations Independent Expert on the rights of older persons examined how these technologies and robots impact older persons’ life and the enjoyment of their rights. Assistive technologies were first designed to perform simple, routine tasks to allow human staff to dedicate more time to complex tasks. Robots are now taking on more and more medical and caregiving tasks. This inevitably affects the enjoyment by older persons of their human rights, including their dignity and autonomy, informational self-determination and non-discrimination and equality. The UN expert stresses the need for a human rights-based approach to underpin discussions in that field and make sure we will adequately address current and future challenges and ensure sufficient protection of older people’s rights.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Hicks

Peggy Hicks

Director. Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
Since January 2016, Peggy Hicks has served as director of the Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division at the UN's human rights office. From 2005 to 2015, she was global advocacy director at Human Rights Watch, where she was responsible for coordinating... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Jelsa (Laico)

9:00am

One Size Fits All? Taking global human rights apps to scale for use in wildly different local contexts
This session will provide an interactive platform for speakers and audience participants to grapple with the inherent tensions of creating human rights apps that are intended to be universal in reach while also usable and feasible invery different local contexts, legal jurisdictions, and security considerations. The discussion will address experiences and lessons learned in taking apps to market and to scale. Responsible design and development of an app, requires us to consider how the app will be used on the ground, information flows, security considerations, and meaningful collaboration with end-users. These steps may be feasible at the pilot stage in a limited number of locations, but this session will examine how feasible it is to engage in local, end-user participation when taking an app to scale in a global market with thousands or even millions of end-users. This discussion will ask the panelists and audience: What does responsible, ethical scale up look like? What does end-user collaboration look like? What are the opportunities, challenges, and risks in creating bespoke tools that are intended to be used globally? What tech, financial and human resources are required to scale up? This session will encourage and engage participants to articulate a way forward.

Moderators
avatar for Betsy Bramon

Betsy Bramon

Principal, Kronia Collaborative
Betsy Bramon, is an interdisciplinary social impact consultant. With a multifaceted background as a donor, policy maker, service provider, and advocate, she works with nonprofits, tech-startups, private foundations and community groups to help teams achieve social good, from the inside... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Betts

Wendy Betts

Project Director, eyeWitness to Atrocities
Wendy Betts is the Director of eyeWitness to Atrocities, an organisation that combines law and technology to promote accountability for serious international crimes. The eyeWitness system allows human rights documenters to capture photos/videos of human rights violations that can... Read More →
avatar for Zara Rahman

Zara Rahman

Deputy Director, The Engine Room
Zara is the Deputy Director of The Engine Room, a non-profit organisation supporting civil society to advance their missions via strategic, effective and responsible use of data and technology.


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Elydhafa (Laico)

9:00am

The Feminist Digisec Network and the Importance of a Feminist Digital Security
The increasing risk presented to women in positions of social and political vulnerability, strongly illustrated by the public execution of Marielle Franco, exposed the urge for more supportive networks of women trainers on digital and integral security. In this intricate scenario in which individual freedom and human rights are threatened for women in a very global context, it's utterly necessary building affective networks and infrastructures - both physical and digital - towards a reimagined digital security culture based on transfeminist perspectives of collective care. Joining members from several experienced organizations and feminist infrastructures, the Feminist Digisec Network share their experiences towards building approaches for digital security training focused on sensible, nurturing and easy to understand methodologies to engage non-technical women and LGBTQIA+ human rights defenders and frontline activits on employing the current technological toolset for digital self-defense and methodologies for context analysis, holistic security, threat and risk model assessment and self-care techniques, bringing some cases and experiences from our activities. Women digital trainers from all the world are invited to join on a critical discussion over constructing narratives based on decolonial and feminist internet principles for a new culture of digital security and online self-preservation.

Moderators
avatar for Bruna Zanolli

Bruna Zanolli

Host Org Artigo 19 Brasil, Mozilla fellow
I'm a self-taught popular interest technologist in the area of ​​autonomous communications and infrastrutures with experience in deployment and maintenance of community networks, especially using LPFM radios and Wifi. I use principles of popular education and intersectional feminism... Read More →

Speakers

Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 2 (Laico)

10:30am

Technological fictions and feminist futures
New technologies function as narrations of a better society. Simultaneously, they are articulations of structures of power that demonstrate how societies handle physical realities. What happens if one provokes those narrations and tries to influence futures of technologies through feminist theories? In our workshop we aim to observe, critique, and re-narrate futures of the internet. By acknowledging the power of imagination in the formulation of technologies we aim to hack and redefine those narrations. We first assess the current state of the internet and analyse where we find patriarchal, capitalist and/or social inequalities. Then, we discuss how responses to those structures of power can look like. In small groups we investigate how an alternative narration could look like in a feminist context. Outcome of each group is a feminist short story of an alternative internet that advocates for digital human rights. By using narration as a cultural practice we aim to shed new light on current debates about a feminist internet and the formulation of technologies. To imagine those futures and to write alternative stories is not only a way to discuss social structures of power, but also to actively shape those futures from a feminist standpoint.


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Limes (Laico)

12:00pm

Tech Demos: Collecting, bridging, and connecting for inclusion
Experimental Methodology for Anonymizing Oral History Testimonies (Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship)

Speakers: Majd Al-shihabi

Cultures have used storytelling to transfer crucial knowledge through generations for centuries, even millennia. In this miniature design workshop session, we will critically evaluate the possibility of using AI to "fuzzify" modern oral history testimonies. An experimental application of this methodology would be to to anonymize identifying information mentioned in testimonies collected for the Syrian Oral History Archive (SOHA). The output of this session will be inserted as an experimental feature in the MASRAD.org open source platform for archiving oral history testimonies.

Connected but Not Connecting: Using Tech to Fight Division & Build Inclusion (Soliya)

Speakers: Dorra Amara and Myriam Labidi

Soliya's tech demo will introduce participants to a platform that promotes civic spaces through virtual exchange, which is the practice of combining technology and facilitation to enable face-to-face and transformative dialogue between people of diverse countries, socioeconomic backgrounds, and perspectives. We will cover how technology, though it has often been used to seed division and has contributed to the decline of civility in difficult conversations, can instead be leveraged for the opposite purpose—bringing the next generation of leaders together across differences and cultures to listen to and be heard by their global peers. Participants will learn how this may be done, how technology can be used to counter the polarization that it has often been accused of strengthening. We will also engage the audience in an activity that we use in our virtual exchange programming to elicit self-awareness around how identity and power dynamics can affect engagement across difference. We will then pose critical thinking questions including: What patterns did you see in what people gave up and what they kept? Looking at all of the different identities in this group, what conversations would be difficult among us? How did it feel to ‘give up’ parts of you?

Bridge: Collaborative Translation Tool (Meedan)

Speakers: Wafaa Heikal

On both the global and national levels, audiences are increasingly multilingual and hungry for reporting and engagement in their own languages. At the same time, non-English content is underrepresented online. New languages for your organization represent new audiences and new forms of engagement. Bridge offers your organization an opportunity to reach communities in new ways, directly through social media and messaging apps. Organizations that have used Bridge to support their social media outreach in other languages have seen a measurable increase in followers and engagement online--by as much as 50%, in some cases.



Speakers
avatar for Dorra Amara

Dorra Amara

Youth Engagement Officer, Soliya
Youth Engagement Officer, certified Cross-Cultural facilitator and a Master degree holder of Cross Cultural Studies.Working on youth empowerment and reinforcing positive change of the youth among their communities, with implementing constructive dialogue models using new media and... Read More →
avatar for Majd Al-shihabi

Majd Al-shihabi

Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship
M

Meedan

Meedan builds digital tools for global journalism and translation. We are a team of designers, technologists and journalists who focus on open source investigation of digital media and crowdsourced translation of social media.


Thursday June 13, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Village Stage (Laico)

1:00pm

Intersection of technology, internet, and sexuality across gender and minority rights in Uganda
Technology as a tool and its attendant benefits such as internet offer different layers regarding the concept of inclusion or exclusion. Benefits accruing to individuals is not just a matter of blanket roll-out of initiatives that benefit everyone once such technology or infrastructure is deployed in a given community. The assumption that such deployment and its concomitant benefits is inclusive are flawed. Our society is dominated by a number of socio-cultural, political and environmental factors among others that inhibits exclusion because technology tools normally sits on a cultural context. Understanding the unique barriers within the context of our societies and how those barriers have negative implications on use of these services by women and girls, men and boys, minority right groups such as LGBQTI communities are imperative. Its on the basis of the unique barriers that several segments in societies experience in the use of internet technology and other digital modes of communication needs further interrogation. This session expect to explore, discuss, examine and interrogate the different dimensions to the concept of inclusion and or exclusion to identify constraints to meaningful access and use and devise or propose strategies to engage policy makers and actors.

Moderators
avatar for Moses Owiny

Moses Owiny

Program Manager - ICT Policy and Information, WOUGNET
Interested in Gender and ICT Policy, Online freedoms and Security

Speakers
avatar for Peace Oliver Amuge

Peace Oliver Amuge

Program Manager, Information Sharing & Networking, Women of Uganda Network ( WOUGNET)
Peace is a Communications/ Public Relations Practitioner with a Bachelor Degree in Public Relations Management and Masters of Arts in International Relations & Diplomatic Studies. She's been working on Gender and ICT policy advocacy, Research around women and ICT's, Project management... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Kigonya

Daniel Kigonya

Executive Director, i freedom Uganda Network
Daniel Kigonya is the Executive Director for i freedom Uganda Network and until recently was the Secretary for Gender and disability at the ISOC-UG Executive Committee. He contributed towards the development of the feminist principals on the Net with the Association for Progressive... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Leptis (Laico)

2:15pm

Beyond Dating Apps: LGBTQ people in other online platforms
This session addresses pressing issues faced by the LGBTQ community in the digital environment. The panel will explore the promises and opportunities of the internet for enabling the development of a strong and thriving LGBTQ community, as well as the challenges and perils posed by new telecommunications technologies when it comes to those users. The primary goal is to move away from discussing dating apps, inviting speakers from civil society and other internet platforms in order to identify other specific issues that have proven to be particularly sensitive for the LGBTQ community and the internet. Considering the “meetup” format proposed by the organizers, participants will engage in more active conversation. At the beginning of the session, speakers will start the conversation by presenting their perspectives on the topic, based on relevant work, research and/or personal experience. They will make a mapping effort in order to identify issues that have proven to be particularly sensitive for the LGBTQ community, such as anonymity and tools for discovering sexuality and gender identity online; access to information, particularly sexual health information; digital security and surveillance, hate speech, harassment and online gender-based violence; advocacy and movement building; and so on.

Moderators
avatar for Dennys Antonialli

Dennys Antonialli

Executive Director, InternetLab
Dennys Antonialli is the Executive Director of InternetLab, a think tank on internet law and policy based in São Paulo, Brazil. Between 2017 and 2018, Dennys was a Professor of Law at the Department of Public Law of the University of São Paulo Faculty of Law (USP), where he also... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for James Heighington

James Heighington

Global Head of Diversity Strategy, Google
James Heighington is Google’s Global Head of Diversity Strategy working to re-imagine the company’s approach to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Previously, Heighington was Chief Digital Officer at GLAAD where he founded a collaboration with Google’s parent company to combat... Read More →
avatar for Thiago Oliva

Thiago Oliva

Head of Research, InternetLab
Thiago Dias Oliva is a Ph.D. student in International Law at the University of São Paulo and head of research on freedom of expression at InternetLab, an independent research center based in São Paulo, Brazil. Thiago holds a master degree in Human Rights (2015) from the same university... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Oya 3 (Laico)
 
Friday, June 14
 

9:00am

Hacking Digital Gender Norms
This session will be in connection to the launch of Hacking Digital Gender Norms book. It will have five speakers discussing some of the existing digital gender norms and the need to break these, and how to do so. They will be bringing in perspectives, experiences, and knowledge from different parts of the world and work with diverse communities at the intersection of gender, sexuality, and technology.

Speakers
avatar for Bishakha Datta

Bishakha Datta

Executive Director, Point of View
Bishakha Datta (@busydot) works on gender, sexuality and digitality, writes and films non-fiction, runs the non-profit Point of View in Mumbai, India, is part of the wikipedia family and serves on several non-profit boards. In all her avatars, Bishakha explores marginal, invisible... Read More →
avatar for Jac sm Kee

Jac sm Kee

Women's Rights Programme Manager, APC, APC (Association for Progressive Communications)
Gender, Sexuality, Access, Internet Governance, Ending online gender-based violence, Sexual surveillance and big data, Freedom of expression & gendered hate speech
avatar for Rozália Klára Bakó

Rozália Klára Bakó

Associate Professor, Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania
Volunteers as trainer and research consultant at StrawberryNet Foundation: digital literacy, debate, and conflict resolution.


Friday June 14, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Oya 1 (Laico)

10:30am

More Than Words Can Say: Localization as a human rights issue
This session will review different types of human rights manuals, digital security training manuals and immigration legal manuals that are available online, and what user needs they meet before discussing localizability and adoption challenges. We will work in small groups to identify challenges and opportunities in adopting the framework in the guide for a particular audience. We will budget about 45 minutes for small groups, which will give plenty of time to do some research and answer the following questions: 1. Are there other guides/materials that are similar to this one? Do they cater to a different audience, or for different situations? (For example, claiming asylum in EU vs. US) What parts are similar, and where do they differ in language or content? 2. Which aspects of this guide/material are applicable in other situations? What makes them universal? 3. Which aspects of this guide/material are not universal, and would need to be changed for other audiences, or jurisdictions? 4. How would you redesign this guide/material, being mindful of localization principles, and knowing others will adopt this framework for their communities?

Moderators
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Founder & Director, Localization Lab
Dragana Kaurin is a human rights researcher and ethnographer working at the intersection of technology, human rights and migration. She is the founder and executive director of Localization Lab, a non-profit organization that works on technology adoption with local communities, research... Read More →

Speakers
NG

Nat Gyenes

Senior Program Manager, Meedan


Friday June 14, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Jelsa (Laico)

10:30am

Solve My Problem: Indigenous Data Sovereignty
RightsCon Solve My Problem sessions will provide an opportunity for representatives from diverse stakeholder groups and regions to come together around a defined problem within the human rights and technology space and devise strategies, actions, and solutions. The identified problem is either associated with one of the major tracks in the RightsCon program or is a linking issue that requires different sets of skills to be addressed.

Open data principles are currently in contradiction to IDS principles that protect Indigenous and ethnic minority rights to data ownership and sovereignty. Moreover, several data initiatives around the world are creating projects around Indigenous data without considering the principles of IDS.

Failure to consider IDS principles will deepen inequities, devalue Indigenous knowledge and expertise, and perpetuate colonial mentalities and infrastructures.

Moderators
avatar for Alejandro Mayoral Banos

Alejandro Mayoral Banos

Executive Director, Indigenous Friends Association
Alejandro Mayoral Banos is an Indigenous activist and Ph.D.Candidate, who is currently working with organizations in Canada and Mexico deploying participatory and community-driven ICT projects by/with/for Indigenous peoples. He is the creator and founder of the Indigenous Friends... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Justin Wiebe

Justin Wiebe

Program Manager, Mastercard Foundation
Justin Wiebe is Michif (Métis) from Saskatoon in Treaty 6 and Métis Territory, and currently lives in Toronto in territories covered by the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant. Justin is passionate about inclusive city-building that centers reconciliation, youth leadership... Read More →
avatar for Pyrou Chung

Pyrou Chung

Senior Adviser, Ewmi Open Development Initiative
I am the Senior Advisor at the Open Development Initiative (ODI) a project of the East West Management Institute (EWMI) and manage their natural resource, land and data initiatives in Southeast Asia. I have expertise in ecology and sustainable development and my work is focused in... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
El Jem (Laico)

1:00pm

Emojis and human rights
They would expect an interactive discussion about the legal implications of Emojis and Human Rights

Moderators
Friday June 14, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Carthage 3 (Laico)

2:15pm

Designing a More Inclusive Digital Economy
Session Objectives:

- Establishing that the digital economy can make the most contributions to development when we purposefully take measures to ensure for inclusion.
- Sharing research about how inclusive access and usage of the internet are today in certain regions, and where are the gaps that need to be addressed.
- Sharing research on how women and some marginalized groups experience the online world, and how this affects their Internet access and usage.
- Exploring policy recommendations that can be taken collaboratively to improve inclusion in the digital economy.

Speakers
avatar for Chenai Chair

Chenai Chair

Research Manager: Gender and Digital Rights, World Wide Web Foundation
avatar for Javiera Moreno

Javiera Moreno

Litigator, Datos Protegidos
AZ

Ayesha Zainudeen

Senior Research Manager, LIRNEasia
avatar for Isabel de Sola

Isabel de Sola

Senior Advisor, Secretariat for the High-level Panel on Digital Cooperation


Friday June 14, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Oya 2 (Laico)