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Welcome to the Official Schedule for RightsCon 2019, the world’s leading summit on human rights in the digital age.

Together at RightsCon Tunis, our first summit hosted in the Middle East and North Africa, more than 2500 expert practitioners will come together across over 400 sessions to shape, contribute to, and drive forward the global agenda for the future of our human rights.

Important note: Whether you’re a session organizer, speaker, or participant, you’ll need to login to Sched or create an account in order to get the most out of the program (including creating a profile and building your own customized RightsCon schedule).

Be sure to get your ticket to RightsCon first. You can visit rightscon.org for more information.

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Tuesday, June 11
 

5:00pm

RightsCon Tunis Opening Ceremonies
Access Now is excited to invite you to RightsCon Tunis 2019, the eighth event of the RightsCon Summit Series. As the world’s leading event on human rights in the digital age, we bring together business leaders, policy makers, general counsels, government representatives, technologists, and human rights defenders from around the world to tackle some of the most pressing issues at the intersection of human rights and digital technology. This is a space for breaking down silos, creating partnerships, and driving large-scale, real-world change toward a more free, open, and connected world.

Our 2019 Opening Ceremonies will take place in the magnificent Palais des Congrès in the heart of downtown Tunis, and will feature high-profile speakers (TBA) and performances from traditional Tunisian musicians. Afterward, join us for the Opening Party, where you'll have the chance to mix and mingle with other attendees!

Speakers
avatar for Wafa Ben-Hassine

Wafa Ben-Hassine

Global Policy Counsel, Access Now
Wafa Ben-Hassine is a New York qualified attorney specializing in international law and technology. She is currently a Global Policy Counsel for Access Now, an international non-profit organization defending and extending human rights in the digital age. In her current role, she manages... Read More →
avatar for Nikki Gladstone

Nikki Gladstone

RightsCon Program and Community Manager, Access Now
Nikki works on RightsCon, the world's leading summit on human rights in the digital age. She is excited about creating inclusive and accessible spaces for the digital rights community to drive change. Before Access Now, Nikki worked with the Wilson Center's Digital Futures Project... Read More →
avatar for Brett Solomon

Brett Solomon

Co-Founder and Executive Director, Access Now
Brett is the Executive Director of Access Now, defending and extending the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining innovative policy, global advocacy, and direct technical support, RightsCon and grant-making, Access Now fights for human rights in the digital... Read More →
avatar for Paloma Munoz

Paloma Munoz

Director, Investor Alliance for Human Rights
Paloma leads the work of the Investor Alliance for Human Rights (IAHR) - a first of its kind network to coordinate broad based investor action to promote the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.
avatar for Nanjala Nyabola

Nanjala Nyabola

Writer and Political Analyst
Nanjala Nyabola is the author of the forthcoming "Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics: How the Internet Era is Transforming Kenya" (ZED books/African Arguments, 2018). She is a Kenyan writer, humanitarian advocate and political analyst, currently based in Nairobi, Kenya.
avatar for Dunja Mijatović

Dunja Mijatović

Dunja Mijatović was elected Commissioner for Human Rights on 25 January 2018 by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe and took up her position on 1 April 2018. Prior to her appointment as Commissioner for Human Rights, she has served as OSCE Representative on Freedom... Read More →
avatar for Mohammed Al-Maskati

Mohammed Al-Maskati

human rights activist and digital security consultant, Front Line Defenders for MENA
Mohammed Abdulnabi al-Maskati is a Bahraini human rights activist and digital security consultant with Front Line Defenders for Middle East and North Africa. He is the founder of the Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights, a leading group in the 2011-2012 Bahraini uprising.



Tuesday June 11, 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

6:30pm

RightsCon Opening Reception
Following the opening ceremonies, join us on the terrace of the Palais des Congrès for refreshments and food. 

Tuesday June 11, 2019 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Palais des Congrès Terrace
 
Wednesday, June 12
 

7:30am

Yoga
Join us for a morning yoga session outside the Laico Hotel's pool deck to center yourself before a busy day at RightsCon!

Wednesday June 12, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Laico Pool Deck

9:00am

AI Explainability, Explained
Algorithmic decision-making has become synonymous with inexplicable decision-making, often described as a black box. The panel will unpack and discuss AI explainability from both a technical and a legal angle. Speakers will touch on what makes algorithms so difficult to explain, look into what technical and legal solutions are being proposed to mitigate this problem, and the Intuitive Appeal of Explainable Machines.

Moderators
avatar for Fanny Hidvégi

Fanny Hidvégi

European Policy Manager, Access Now
Fanny (@infofannny) is Access Now’s European Policy Manager based in Brussels. Previously, Fanny was International Privacy Fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. where she focused on E.U.-U.S. data transfers. For three years Fanny led the Freedom... Read More →

Speakers
AW

Anne Weber

Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights Council of Europe


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Adean (Palais)

9:00am

Let's See the Evidence! Algorithmic decisions in real life - where and how are they used?
Most studies and reports published in the field of Artificial Intelligence and Algorithmic Decision-Making (ADM) focus on analysing government positions and drafting guidelines for the development and use of ADM and AI. At the same time, too little is known about the prevalence of these systems in real life. We will share state-of-the art information about the practice of algorithmic decision-making processes already in use which we researched for our reports "AUTOMATING SOCIETY - Taking Stock of Automated Decision-Making in the EU" (AlgorithmWatch) and "HELP WANTED: An Examination of Hiring Algorithms, Equity, and Bias" (Upturn). In a first part, we will briefly present excerpts of our research and discuss the substance of it. In a second part, we will share our experience in regard of /how/ we researched the issue and will discuss these experiences. Together with session participants, we will begin to develop best practices and discuss how to disseminated these lessons across civil society.

Moderators
Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
El Jem (Laico)

9:00am

Building the First Global Perceptions of Gender and Online Violence
The Global Perceptions of Gender and Online Violence (GP-GOV) is the first ever perceptions-based truly global study on the topic of online gender-based violence to be conducted. Over 30,000 citizens from 15 developing countries will share their opinions as part of this study, making it the largest and most unique in the space of online gender-based violence. RightsCon will be one of the first platforms the GP-GOV data will be shared at, and all attendees are invited to participate in the discussion on how to further reduce and ultimately prevent online gender-based violence. This session will begin with a short overview of the GP-GOV project by the project partners: ABA ROLI, USAID, and RIWI Corp., who will highlight key findings from the analysis. Following this, a facilitated discussion between panelists will take place on the necessity of listening to citizens and engaging those who are typically not heard from on a topic that touches many people. The audience will be invited and encouraged to participate in this discussion, opening the floor to everyone’s thoughts not just on the data from the first GP-GOV study, but on how they envision and recommend the GP-GOV taking shape to span across the world.

Moderators
avatar for Alix Lawson

Alix Lawson

Program Officer, Freedom House
I am the Program Officer at Freedom House for the Human Rights Support Mechanism, an LWA under USAID for human rights programming. My interests include human rights work and its intersection with technology.

Speakers
avatar for Mercedes Fogarassy

Mercedes Fogarassy

Portfolio Manager, Global Citizen Engagement, RIWI Corp.
Mercedes manages the Global Citizen Engagement portfolio at RIWI Corp., focusing on amplifying citizen voices for partners in the humanitarian sector, including the World Food Programme, USAID, Oxfam, Freedom House and more.RIWI is a global survey technology and sentiment analysis... Read More →
avatar for Teresa Parr

Teresa Parr

U.S. Agency for International Development


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Leptis (Laico)

9:00am

Lightning Talks: Tales of (un)lawful data protection
Data Law and Blockchain: technical (in)compatibility (University of São Paulo / Pinheiro Neto Advogados)

Description: Blockchain is one of the most relevant technology in recent times, and its application goes far beyond cryptocurrencies and financial services. Such technology can be used for contract registration, creation of virtual identities, intelligent devices, among others relevant business and opportunities. On the other hand, regarding legislative innovation, Data Law such as the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) aim to regulate the processing of personal data and provide rights and guarantees to data subject. In this scenario, we intend to analyze the challenge between the possible technical incompatibility between blockchain and the so-called "right to be forgotten". Thus, we intend to: (i) understand what blockchain technology is; (ii) deal with data erasure and its prediction in GDPR, in the end, (iii) analyze the possible technical incompatibility between both and the possible solutions.

Speaker: Caio César de Oliveira

The Global Data Protection Index: discover our concept (Access Now)

Description: The objective of the session is to present the idea of Access Now Global Data Protection Index which will map and rate data protection law all around the world. In this session, participants will be introduced to the concept, scope and focus of the project and a draft rating system before being invited to provide feedback to the process, point to existing resources and suggest modifications to the criteria.

Speaker: Estelle Masse

GDPR For Citizens (Electronic Frontier Finland, Open Knowledge Finland, ICANN NPOC)

Description: The whole focus of the session is getting people to take our free course on the essential data protection principles of the GDPR and give people clear examples of how to exercise their rights. By completing the whole course, you may also want to be part of a record that lists the number of violations that people encounter with particular service providers, for example. People can have their data erased from aggressive direct marketers databases and object to processing of their personal information - most of us simply don’t know how to go about it. I will quickly run through the essential rights of the GDPR for citizens and introduce the course and how to use it in our platform that is specifically designed for MOOCs on mobile phones. If the people don't know how to use their rights, GDPR will not be enforced they way it was supposed to. The more people exercise their rights, the more we will help in forming meaningful precedents of the privacy violations, that are still rampant in all European countries.

Speaker: Raoul Plommer

The transparent passenger – PNR mass data retention and privacy (Gesellschaft für Freiheitsrechte - GFF)

Description: The EU Passenger Name Record Directive obliges air carriers not only to process but also to transfer passenger name record (PNR) data of passengers of EU flights to national security authorities. This set of PNR data includes information such as name, credit card information, travel history or fellow travellers. After having received the data, national authorities are obliged to match them with possibly suspicious flight patterns. The Directive’s approach results in mass surveillance, because it affects all passengers, even when they are not suspected of anything, let alone charged with a particular crime. Our ultimate goal is for the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to declare the aforementioned Directive incompatible with EU primary law and thereby null and void. In our Lightning Talk, we would like to share with the RightsCon community both the process of how we conceptualized this litigation project in cooperation with several European partners and the significance which PNR data retention holds for privacy rights throughout Europe. Moreover, we would like to discuss how this case might serve as an example of how to collectively and efficiently combat Europe-wide threats to human rights in the future.

Speaker: Lea Beckmann and Ulf Buermeyer

Speakers
avatar for Lea Beckmann

Lea Beckmann

Litigator and Coordinator, Gesellschaft für Freiheitsrechte e.V. (GFF)
Lea is a human rights lawyer at Gesellschaft für Freiheitsrechte e.V. (GFF), a Berlin based NGO focussing on strategic litigation. She is responsible for the legal case work as well as the coordination with partners.
avatar for Ulf Buermeyer

Ulf Buermeyer

President, Gesellschaft für Freiheitsrechte - GFF.NGO
Ulf Buermeyer is cofounder and president of GFF, an NGO based in Berlin that advances human rights by setting up smart lawsuits.
avatar for Raoul Plommer

Raoul Plommer

Board member, Effi ry
DIY-Connectivity with MESH, Digital rights, Pirate Parties


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Village Stage (Laico)

9:00am

Improving Cooperation to Advance Human Rights Online
This session aims to help participants better understand the challenges and opportunities of working with diplomatic missions to advance human rights online. Speakers and participants will share their experiences, best practices, and recommendations for productive engagement. Leveraging the expertise of diplomats and civil society, this practical, action-oriented discussion will contribute to participants’ immediate work and assist in the development of a toolkit to further strengthen embassies’ Internet freedom-related engagement with civil society.

Speakers
avatar for 'Gbenga Sesan

'Gbenga Sesan

Executive Director, Paradigm Initiative
‘Gbenga Sesan is the Executive Director of Paradigm Initiative, a social enterprise that works on digital rights and digital inclusion across Africa, with offices in Cameroon, Nigeria, Tanzania, Togo and Zambia. Originally trained as an Electronic & Electrical Engineer at Obafemi... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Amilcar (Laico)

9:00am

Measuring Respect for Human Rights – Using benchmarks to create a race to the top in the ICT sector
Despite efforts from policy makers, civil society, investors, and companies, poor working conditions are prevalent in electronics supply chains, and freedom of expression and privacy rights of users are systematically undermined. Publicly available benchmarks such as the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark, Ranking Digital Rights, and KnowTheChain equip a wide range of users – from investors to governments to civil society – with the tools to engage companies on their human rights impacts. This session will answer the following questions: Why benchmarking? How does it work? Who uses benchmarks and how I can use them? The panelists will explain the model of change behind benchmarks and provide an interactive demonstration of the benchmark data and analysis. Participants will be encouraged to find the results to questions such as: Is Google or Facebook more transparent about its policies that affect users' privacy and freedom of expression? How do Apple’s and Samsung’s efforts to ensure remediation for supply chains workers compare? Panelists and audience members will provide examples of how different types of stakeholders have used benchmarks to encourage improved corporate respect for human rights, and the panelists will share what changes in corporate human rights policies and processes have been observed.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Laura Reed

Laura Reed

Research and Engagement Manager, Ranking Digital Rights
avatar for Felicitas Weber

Felicitas Weber

KnowTheChain Project Lead, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre
Interested in: impactful worker engagement, addressing forced labor, measuring corporate efforts to address forced labor (esp in lower tiers), engaging investors


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Celtic (Palais)

9:00am

Responding to Mass Atrocities in the Digital Age: Challenges and Lessons Learned from Myanmar
In 2018, the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar concluded that the role of social media had been significant in the spread of hate speech across the country. Drawing on the events in Myanmar, participants will be invited to discuss two core questions:

1. What is the key lesson we can take from the Myanmar Fact-Finding Mission’s work on the use of social media evidence for human rights investigations?

2. What are the responsibilities of social media companies to prevent, detect and/or remove hate speech, giving particular consideration to the trade-off between freedom of expression and policing hate speech, as well as the kinds of accountability mechanisms that may be applied to direct perpetrators and the platforms they rely upon to spread hate speech in practice?

Moderators
avatar for Barrie Sander

Barrie Sander

Postdoctoral Fellow, Fundação Getulio Vargas
Barrie Sander is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Brazil. His research interests include global cybersecurity norms, human rights and technology, and international criminal law. Currently, Barrie is examining the paradigms of international law that apply... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Raj Singh

Shannon Raj Singh

Legal Officer, Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Shannon Raj Singh is an Associate Legal Officer with the Special Tribunal for Lebanon in The Hague, where she advises the Appeals Chamber on procedural and substantive issues of international law. She has previous experience working with the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda... Read More →
avatar for Dunstan Allison-Hope

Dunstan Allison-Hope

Managing Director, Business for Social Responsibility (BSR)
Dunstan leads BSR's human rights, inclusive economy, and women's empowerment practice areas. Dunstan's specialist fields are human rights due diligence in the technology sector and sustainability reporting and disclosure. Dunstan facilitated the multistakeholder process which led... Read More →
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate... Read More →
YM

Yvonne McDermott Rees

Swansea University
avatar for Sarah Joseph

Sarah Joseph

Director, Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, Monash University
avatar for Rebecca Hamilton

Rebecca Hamilton

Assistant Professor of Law, American University, Washington College of Law
Rebecca ("Bec") Hamilton is an Assistant Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law, and has just been awarded a 2019-2020 fellowship from the Council on Foreign Relations.Bec is the author of Fighting for Darfur: Public Action and the Struggle to Stop Genocide... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Hannibal (Laico)

9:00am

Tech Demos: Open (source) for business
The Knowledge Hub Framework: A new tool to automate open source research for more efficient human rights fact-finding (Swansea University)

Speakers: Yvonne McDermott Rees, Riza Batista-Navarro, and Victoria Ikoro

This session will demonstrate a prototype of the ‘Knowledge Hub Framework’ (KHF), a tool under development as part of the OSR4Rights project. The KHF is a set of core tools for automatically gathering data from social media, news feeds, and direct sources, and for carrying out specific analytical tasks. These analytical tasks include: comparing documents for semantic similarity, identifying place names within free text so they can be located on a map, and checking the origins and assigning weightings to data sources based on crosschecks and historical accuracies. This tool is intended to facilitate the discovery stage of a human rights investigation, where investigators identify huge quantities of potentially relevant content.

An open source alternative to online office suites (Greenhost)

Speakers: Maarten de Waard

NGOs face a dizzying array of bad options for their communications and information technology needs. Many of the core systems on which many groups rely are subject to levels of tracking and surveillance that are not compatible with the goals and principles of these organizations. Besides tracking and surveillance, by using online services like the Google Suite, Slack and Dropbox, they are sharing their precious data with big commercial parties. This first part of this session gives an overview of the alternatives that are available to these organisations. The focus lies on chat, file storage and collaborative document editing. All applications discussed in this session are open source and can be hosted on self owned infrastructure. With running applications on self owned infrastructure a new challenge arises: somebody needs to keep the software up to date, configure it to work together and make sure people can log into the it. This is where OpenAppStack comes in. The second part of the session describes how OpenAppStack solves these problems.

NEMO an Open-Source Data Collection System for the Future (The Carter Center)

Speakers: Zied Abaoub

The main goal of this session is to demonstrate the open-source, NEMO data collection tool. NEMO can be used to collect data from multiple sources (SMS, android app or online) and facilitates real time reporting. NEMO has been used successfully for election observation (ELMO), human rights reporting, public health reporting, human rights alert and protection, academic research, and program monitoring and evaluation in Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

Speakers
avatar for Zied Abaoub

Zied Abaoub

Nemo Data Collection Specialist, The Carter Center
avatar for Maarten	de Waard

Maarten de Waard

Developer, Greenhost
I work on OpenAppStack, an easy to host alternative to onliine office environments, that is open source, easy to host and integrated, but most of all lets you reclaim control over your online data!
YM

Yvonne McDermott Rees

Swansea University


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Caspian (Palais)

9:00am

Fat Futures: On Reimagining Flesh and Possibility
The goal of Fat Futures is to invite folks of all identities and backgrounds into an introductory workshop on fat bodies, fat oppression, and the relationship to technology. We will help develop individual and organizational practices for humanizing, including, and cultivating accessibility around fat bodies; specifically addressing how violence shows up for fat folks and how fat oppression in physical spaces shows up within digital spaces.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Oya 3 (Laico)

9:00am

The big dataset in the sky: challenging geographies of discrimination
An interactive discussion on challenging “geographies of discrimination” that will bring a perspective from the “Global South” to ,e.g., (1) international trade and investment agreements negotiations, (2) the Sustainable Development Goals implementation, (3) the United Nations and regional human rights mechanisms work, and (4) ensuring accountability to the Global South for decision-making and governance of digital technologies. Digital technologies can contribute to the realization of human rights, including the right to development. They also present great challenges by building a brave new world and a highly unequal one. Digital divides and closing gaps can be addressed in terms of access to and affordability of digital technologies and platforms in developing countries. However, “the big data divide” is a far larger gap. This is the divide between those who generate data and those who collect, store and use data, the former excluded from access to data, expertise and processing power, power which is increasingly opaque, indecipherable and too vast. This is not a question of privacy or protection alone, but one of discrimination and powerlessness. The session will debate challenges to closing geographic digital divides, in what is a highly uneven, under-regulated playing field rife in money, profits and big monopolies.

Moderators
avatar for Diego Valadares

Diego Valadares

Human Rights Officer, UN Human Rights
I work in the Right to Development Section of UN Human Rights. I hold a LLM in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (Geneva Academy) and I am currently writing a PhD thesis on Political Science (Federal University of Minas Gerais).

Speakers
avatar for Naman Aggarwal

Naman Aggarwal

Asia Policy Associate, Access Now
avatar for J. Carlos Lara

J. Carlos Lara

Director - Public Policy, Derechos Digitales
Internet lover, coffee lover, live music lover, bacon lover, dog lover, cat lover, internet hater.
avatar for Arthur Gwagwa

Arthur Gwagwa

Senior Research Fellow, Strathmore University (CIPIT)
Arthur is currently working on a project funded by the Open Technology Fund. The project will detect, document, and analyze current and emerging cyber threats with a long term goal to mitigate their impact on users at risk in specific Sub-Saharan African countries especially around... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 3 (Laico)

9:00am

Cloudy with a chance of cybernorms?
This session will work toward a greater understanding of the current state of play when it comes to cybernorms. It will include an overview of global cybernorms initiatives, including the First Committee processes, the identification of human-rights respecting and multi-stakeholder proposals for cybernorms and discuss how these can be channeled into opportunities to engage in the First Committee and other processes

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Mallory Knodel

Mallory Knodel

Head of Digital, ARTICLE 19
avatar for Dr Ludmila Georgieva

Dr Ludmila Georgieva

Public Policy and Government Relations Manager, EU, Google
Ludmila joined the EU Policy Team of Google in Brussels in December 2018 and is in charge of cybersecurity and privacy issues. Before joining Google, she worked first in a large law company in Vienna and in 2009 joined the Federal Chancellery of Austria (Constitutional Service) and... Read More →
TS

Timo S Koster

Ambassador for Security Policy & Cyber, MFA Netherlands
avatar for 'Gbenga Sesan

'Gbenga Sesan

Executive Director, Paradigm Initiative
‘Gbenga Sesan is the Executive Director of Paradigm Initiative, a social enterprise that works on digital rights and digital inclusion across Africa, with offices in Cameroon, Nigeria, Tanzania, Togo and Zambia. Originally trained as an Electronic & Electrical Engineer at Obafemi... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Dougga (Laico)

9:00am

Combating Cybercrime Laws in the Middle East and North Africa Region
The session aims to define the shortcomings of the legislation in relation with right of freedom of expression/the right to access to information and to propose solutions and best practices that can enhance these laws.

القوانين المتعلقة بالجرائم الالكترونية في منطقة الشرق الأوسط وشمال إفريقيا

أهداف هذه الورشة التفاعلية : 1- التعريف بالتشريعات المتعلقة بجرائم الاتصال والمعلومات 2- بسط نقائص التشريعات في علاقتها بالحق في حرية التعبيرمنظمات الفاعلة في منطقة الشرق الأوسط وشمل إفريقيا 3- اقتراح الحلول الكفيلة بتنقية هذه التشريعات من الشوائب المتعارضة مع الحق في حرية التعبير 4- ابراز علاقة الحقوق الرقمية بالحق في حرية التعبير ومدى التكامل بينهما

Moderators
avatar for Saloua Ghazouani

Saloua Ghazouani

Regional director Tunisia and MENA, ARTICLE 19
Saloua Ghazouani Oueslati- Regional Director of ARTICLE 19 MENA Office. She has 16 years of experience working in non-governmental and multi-lateral organizations, including the UNDP in Tunisia and the Center of Arab Women for Training and Research (CAWTAR). Saloua holds an MSc in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Issa Mahasneh

Issa Mahasneh

Executive Director, Jordan Open Source Association (JOSA)
avatar for Ines Osman

Ines Osman

Co-founder and director, MENA Rights Group
Hi! I am French-Algerian human rights lawyer, co-founder & director of MENA Rights Group. We are a team of lawyers providing legal counselling to victims of abuses and lobbying for legal and policy reform in the MENA region.
avatar for JU.Dr. Aymen Zaghdoudi

JU.Dr. Aymen Zaghdoudi

Professor in public law and MENA Legal advisor, Article 19
Legal advisor at ARTICLE 19 MENA and professor in public law with a focus on freedom of expression and media laws issues.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Cyrene (Laico)

9:00am

When Two Rights Make a Wrong: Finding a way forward when competing rights fail to protect the most vulnerable in our society
The importance of respecting and upholding human rights in a digital age is clear; the route to achieving this, sometimes less so. Particularly challenging are those occasions where fundamental rights find themselves somewhat in tension. This is often visible when navigating the parameters of inappropriate surveillance versus legitimate crime fighting; where tools used by activists to protect their identity are the same tools that are misused by criminals to evade detection; where measures that are in place to protect citizens’ right to privacy, make investigations of criminality – sometimes the worst kinds of criminality, such as crimes against children – challenging for law enforcement. Our strategic roundtable will bring together stakeholders from industry, civil society, academia and law enforcement. It will seek to take advantage of the range of experts at RightsCon to respectfully discuss this paradox within a specific context – child sexual exploitation and abuse - and seek greater mutual understanding, as well as looking for options to work through the challenges experienced on each side. To ensure coverage of a range of perspectives, expert speakers will formally open the conversation by summarising the issues their stakeholder group faces and potential opportunities for overcoming them.

Moderators
avatar for Natasha Jackson

Natasha Jackson

Head of Public Policy & Consumer Affairs, GSMA

Speakers
avatar for Victoria Baines

Victoria Baines

Principal, Cartimandua Insight
Former Facebook executive and Europol officer. Independent researcher on cybercrime, online safety, public policy and security. Co-host of the Cyber Warrior Princess podcast.
BL

Bjørn-Erik Ludvigsen

Criminal Intelligence Officer, INTERPOL
avatar for Marianne Díaz Hernández

Marianne Díaz Hernández

Public Policy Analyst, Derechos Digitales
Marianne Diaz is a Venezuelan lawyer, digital rights activist and fiction writer, currently based in Santiago, Chile. Her work focuses mainly on issues regarding online freedom of speech, web filtering, internet infrastructure and digital security. She founded the digital rights NGO... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Elydhafa (Laico)
  • Host Organization GSMA

9:00am

Citizens or Users? Building the global resistance against platform monopolies
The session will be a unique opportunity to address the issue of fundamental rights in platforms society from 3 various, but complementary perspectives: international, regional (European) and national (Polish). Digital platforms are said to facilitate and shape human interactions, thus becoming important cultural, economic and social actors. Increasingly rooted in the daily life of many individuals, platforms monetize social interactions. Many sectors and social practices are being “platformised”, from public health to security, from news to entertainment services. While the companies offering platform services are increasingly the target of regulative action, not all of those actions take into account fundamental rights arguments. We believe that there is room for the discussion on the role of platforms in the system of fundamental rights protection. The question is how to regulate platforms (or self-regulate) in order to make sure that they comply with fundamental rights. The speakers will elaborate on recent regulatory actions on various levels - while evaluating the various responses by authorities, best and worst practices will be selected. Since the session will be a fireside chat, all participants will be welcomed to share their questions and remarks.

Moderators
avatar for Diego Naranjo

Diego Naranjo

Senior Policy Advisor, European Digital Rights (EDRi)

Speakers
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab
CC-Brazil coordinator and GNC representative.I am also the director of InternetLab, where I do research around human rights and the Internet; Internet regulation; Gender and Tech; Access to knowledge and Copyright.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Jelsa (Laico)

9:00am

Tech Demos: Mischief managed – measuring and mapping for human rights
IODA: A platform to detect and analyse Internet outages (CAIDA, University of California San Diego (UCSD))

Speakers: Alberto Dainotti and Ramakrishna Padmanabhan

When governments order Internet shutdowns, large parts of regions within the countries can experience outages in Internet connectivity. In our session, we will introduce the audience to our tool, IODA, that detects such outages and enables the observation of their characteristics (timing, geographic extent, etc.) through visual interfaces. The Internet Outage Detection and Analysis (IODA) system monitors the Internet in near-realtime and detects outages affecting regions and networks around the world. IODA has detected and documented many Internet connectivity shutdowns in the past, including shutdowns in countries such as Iraq, Gabon, and Mexico. In this session, we will show the audience what IODA can do for them. We will provide the audience an overview of how to use IODA by exploring recent events of interest to the audience. We hope to get feedback from the audience on how to improve IODA; primarily related to usability, accessibility, and functionality. More broadly, we want the audience to understand that information about Internet connectivity shutdowns doesn't have to be limited to hearsay and uncertainty. Being built on peer-reviewed network measurement research, IODA demystifies Internet shutdowns by providing timely facts and powerful analysis tools.

Tactical Mapping: Visualizing Relationships Surrounding Human Rights Problems (Center for Victims of Torture - New Tactics in Human Rights)

Speakers: Brent Jensen and Ayman Malhis  

After a brief introduction, attendees will be introduced to the Tactical Mapping Tool through the use of a case study. Speakers will walk through how the tool will help them to develop a problem statement, vision statement, connections map, spectrum of allies diagram and tactical reports. The group will discuss how the selected inputs from the case study impact the way advocacy and targeted action is implemented. A Tunisian human rights activists, Rania Derbel, from TuMed and participant in Rawabet, will provide attendees with real-life uses of the tool in order to provide context around the implementation of the tool in human rights advocacy. Speakers will include English, Arabic and French speakers, while the tool is built in both English and Arabic. Each attendee will have the option of creating their own account at the end of the session to gain access to the online tool.

Measuring what matters: Launch of human rights data tool to track countries’ progress and spark improvement (Human Rights Measurement Initiative)

Speakers: Anne-Marie Brook, Susan Randolph, and Thalia Kehoe Rowden

Do you or your organisation monitor or report on human rights issues? Are you supporting HRDs who monitor in-country human rights violations? If so, then this session is for you. This session will be a hands-on experiential demo of the new Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI) data viz website - due to be launched just days before RightsCon. You will learn: - how to access and interpret comprehensive information on the human rights performance of countries - how HRDs can magnify their voices by feeding their knowledge into our tool - how to integrate comprehensive human rights data analysis into your advocacy work For example, you will learn how to: - use HRMI data to position a specific case in the bigger picture - see whether respect for human rights is improving or deteriorating in a country - compare performance across countries and draw conclusions for needed changes to laws, policies and practices - help interpret progress on the SDGs. Participants with laptops or other devices can explore the data tool in real time. Our team will roam the room to answer questions and provide assistance.

Speakers
avatar for Brent Jensen

Brent Jensen

Online Engagement Coordinator, CVT - New Tactics in Human Rights
Brent Jensen is the online community coordinator for New Tactics in Human Rights with the Center for Victims of Torture (CVT). He is responsible for overseeing the program’s online presence, including website, social media channels, online community, web applications and e-learning... Read More →
avatar for Alberto Dainotti

Alberto Dainotti

Research Scientist, CAIDA, University of California San Diego (UCSD)
Internet connectivity shutdowns / Internet outageshttps://ioda.caida.org/ioda/dashboard#from=-1w&until=nowTwitter: @caida_iodahttps://www.caida.org/~alberto/
avatar for Ramakrishna	Padmanabhan

Ramakrishna Padmanabhan

Postdoctoral researcher, CAIDA, University of California San Diego (UCSD)
I am an Internet measurement researcher studying various aspects of the Internet, including its connectivity and performance. As part of CAIDA's IODA team (ioda.caida.org), I study Internet outages caused by shutdowns, severe weather, and other causes. I would love to hear feedback... Read More →
avatar for Ayman Malhis

Ayman Malhis

Center for Victims of Torture - New Tactics in Human Rights
avatar for Anne-Marie Brook

Anne-Marie Brook

Co-founder, Human Rights Measurement Initiative
Until now the world hasn’t had a simple, comprehensive and transparent way to monitor how well countries are respecting the rights of their people. This was a problem; when something is not measured, it is easily overlooked and undervalued. We are now filling this gap. Please get... Read More →
avatar for Thalia Kehoe Rowden

Thalia Kehoe Rowden

Communications Lead, Human Rights Measurement Initiative
Kia ora!I'm part of the Human Rights Measurement Initiative and delighted to be at my first RightsCon.We are the first global project to track the human rights progress of countries.Come and talk to us to explore how our data can be useful for making decisions and telling your important... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Limes (Laico)

9:00am

Smart Cities: Their future or yours?
The session will start with the three organizers briefly sharing ‘smart-city’ initiatives in their respective cities: Toronto, CA (Sidewalk Labs); Berlin, DE (AfD doxing, Fuck Off Google); and Boston, USA (FabCity Global Initiative, City-Scoring). Following the introduction, we will begin mapping the local representation in the room and divide into small working groups with cross-continental and diverse perspectives. The goal of the working groups will be to share smart-city initiatives taking place in our communities and draft a Public Service Announcement (PSA). The PSA will be a call-to-arms for communities to band together by sharing lessons learned and organizing strategies against the onslaught of corporate oligarchy and the commodification of public data, infrastructure, and services. We will discuss comparative issues pertinent to millennial demographics such as: housing, the gig economy, education, healthcare, public consultation, climate change, and multilateral trade agreements on data infrastructure and surveillance tools. The goal of this session will be to go against the grain of neoliberal conceptualizations of ‘smart-cities’, or in other words: re-define our cities as ‘smart’ ONLY IF public services are equitable, accessible and inclusive.

Moderators
avatar for Daniella Barreto

Daniella Barreto

Digital Activism Coordinator, Amnesty International Canada
I'm interested in issues related to race and anti-oppression, surveillance, smart cities, LGBTQ2S+, public health/epidemiology. I'm also a producer and co-host of RUDE the Podcast. Our two-part special on digital rights and surveillance drops on June 13! www.rudethepodcast.com
avatar for James Duncan

James Duncan

Graduate Researcher, University of Toronto

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 1 (Laico)

9:00am

Big Tech and the Future of Journalism: Reinventing news and information in the age of Google and Facebook
This session is meant to consider the wider impact of the digital economy on democratic societies, and will take a hard look at both the benefits and harms of a world where global platforms are dominant distributors of news and information as well as major forums for public debate. Currently, the sector-specific approach to media regulation is inadequate. Regulatory disparities between digital platforms and heavily-regulated media businesses lead to market advantages that these platforms have (and often abuse). Additionally, many states are taking an approach to online content regulation by essentially “subcontracting censorship” to digital platforms. Thus, the time is right for addressing market mechanism- and failure-related challenges as well as regulatory and ultimately information flow challenges in digital environments.

One of the biggest problems with the debates raging in government legislatures and policy circles around the world is the lack of attention given to the news, journalism, and information ecosystems, and the implications of digital platforms’ market power on access and availability of quality news content on the Internet. To foster a pluralistic media ecosystem that strengthens democratic systems, combats dis/misinformation, and produces professional, high-quality, and fact-based news, media sustainability must be considered a significant priority. Any serious effort to address the myriad problems plaguing digital platforms must include competition authorities, economists, media policy experts as well as privacy, digital rights freedom of expression advocates. Building on this context, this session will explore five key issues/questions related to digital market mechanism- and failure-related challenges, including:

(1) How to monitor digital platforms’ activities, their market behaviours, and the potential consequences of those activities for citizens, journalists, news media organisations, and advertisers.

(2) Strategies to address regulatory imbalances – i.e., what are new approaches to the regulation of digital spaces?

(3) How to better inform consumers/citizens of their rights when dealing with digital platforms.

(4) What are the mechanisms that would support and sustain choice and quality of news and journalism in digital spaces?

(5) Market power and behaviour of digital advertising’s two most-dominant companies, Google and Facebook, what can be done to address competition barriers, and how to promote plurality, sustainability, and diversity as well as overall consumer choices.

The session will take a holistic approach to the topic by treating each of these factors as equally important pieces of the larger puzzle of media ecosystem failure as well as the subsequent problems it creates that are currently vexing governments.


Resources and recommended reading:

GFMD’s Internet Governance Resource Centre: https://gfmd.info/internet-governance/ 

Moderators
Speakers
NM

Nathalie Maréchal

Senior research analyst, Ranking Digital Rights
Corporate transparency & accountability; surveillance capitalism; targeted advertising business models; artificial intelligence & human rights
avatar for Timothy Karr

Timothy Karr

Senior Director of Strategy, Free Press
Tim builds on the Free Press' grassroots and policy work to promote universal access to open and affordable networks, defend acts of journalism and protect free speech everywhere. Before joining Free Press, Tim served as the vice president of business development for Globalvision... Read More →
avatar for Deniz Yazici

Deniz Yazici

Adviser, Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Oya 2 (Laico)

9:00am

Creating Shared Global Workflows for Social Media Monitoring
The central objective of the session would be to convene groups working on social media collection and monitoring to describe new efforts to integrate datasets of social media data, develop and define workflows and standards, demonstrate tools for content collection and verification, discuss strategies for collaboration and integration, provide some feedback, ask questions, help develop tools, and incubate a new group of potential users for content collection and sharing. While initiatives like the Credibility Coalition, the Journalism Trust Initiative, Trust Project and TrustMetrics, NewsGuard and the W3C Credible Web Community Group are making efforts to develop standards, and numerous initiatives are working on datasets, limited resources are being devoted to communities in the Global South. Stakeholders such as the international human rights community and organizations working toward protecting free expression should also be more closely involved. In this session, our aim is to bring together more of the RightsCon community into the conversation and determine practical steps for moving forward.

Moderators
DA

Daniel Arnaudo

Senior Program Manager, National Democratic Institute
I am a senior program manager at NDI for governance, covering the intersection of democracy and technology with a special responsibility to develop projects tracking disinformation worldwide. Concurrently, I am a Research Fellow with the Igarapé Institute of Rio de Janeiro and a... Read More →

Speakers
NG

Nat Gyenes

Senior Program Manager, Meedan


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Utique (Laico)

9:00am

Lightning Talks: Understanding and combating misinformation
Fake news storm in East Asia: how to measure disinformation in East Asian countries (Open Culture Foundation)

Description: In this lightning talk, participants should expect to get the basic understanding of the disinformation situation in East and South-East Asia. This includes the origin, type, seriousness, legislation, and responses etc... This session will also highlight the common problems and challenges facing the region regarding disinformation. Some of them could be seen in other regions as well. Additionally, participants will learn the know-how of the disinformation map approach to identify all those elements in different countries in the region and also how to apply it to their region. Thirdly, participants will learn the common strategies developed in dealing with the disinformation situation. Lastly, participants will have the chance to think about disinformation issues at the regional level and to understand what and how can be done to tackle the problems.

Speaker: Yu-Hsuan Chang

Mercenaries of misinformation: Examples of disinformation actions in politics of Ecuador (Usuarios Digitales)

Description: The session will focus on trolls attack groups for political issues. - Introduction of the impact they achieve - Types of attack - Cases of Ecuador Collaborative actions will be carried out to expand and collect more cases can be presented and guide how to obtain evidence

Speaker: Alfredo Velazco

Fighting Fake News with Media & Information Literacy (Digital Empowerment Foundation)

Description: According to IndiaSpend, there have been over 65 cases of mob violence in India in 2018, leading to deaths of 30 persons. The phenomenon of fake news threatens India’s democracy and secularism. This trend of increasing misinformation is not unique to India but also other developing countries. Digital Empowerment Foundation (DEF) works across 500 villages of India, empowering communities with access to digital tools. The organization sees its responsibility in ensuring that community members have the understanding of accessing and evaluating information before consuming it. Thus, Media & Information Literacy (MIL) is an integral part of DEF’s digital literacy toolkit called START. The session titled Fighting Fake News with MIL will discuss the paradox that exists in India. It will give an overview of the scale of problem of misinformation in India, and lead the conversation to DEF’s efforts in the areas of MIL, focusing on how its training influence administrators, civil society, teachers, students, etc... in non-metropolitan cities of India. The goals are: to share efforts for MIL in rural areas with focus on oral communities and first-generation users, to explain why misinformation is more worrisome in India, identifying solutions to tackle misinformation, particularly in rural India.

Speaker: Osama Manzar

What's in a name - misinformation vs. disinformation (Center for International and Strategic Studies)

Description: Misinformation, disinformation, propaganda, rumour -- you've all heard the terms used to describe viral deception, but do you know the difference between them? How do online harassment, trolling, and information operations uses to promote these tactics? Join Brittan Heller as she explains how these terms are distinctive, how they overlap, and what different behaviours and actors are implicated in each one.

Speaker: Brittan Heller

Speakers
avatar for Osama Manzar

Osama Manzar

Founder-Director, Digital Empowerment Foundation
I'm committed to the mission of eradicating information poverty from India and global south using digital tools through Digital Empowerment Foundation, an organisation I founded with my wife in 2002. Let's talk about how is the Internet revolutionising rural India?
avatar for Brittan Heller

Brittan Heller

Senior Associate, Human Rights Initiative, CSIS
Brittan Heller works at the intersection of technology, human rights, and the law, and is an expert on content moderation and the movement from online conduct to offline violence. She is the founder of the Center for Digital Civil Rights, an innovation lab for human and civil rights... Read More →
avatar for Alfredo Velazco

Alfredo Velazco

Director, Usuarios Digitales


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
The BeeHive (Palais)

9:00am

Millimeter Waves, Small Cells, Beamforming, Oh My! Anticipating and addressing human rights impacts in a 5G environment
5G technology is well touted, but poorly understood. Experts agree that the transition from 4G to 5G will be significantly different from previous transitions, leading to new physical infrastructure and system architectures, bandwidth utilization, capabilities, and uses. These include the introduction or expansion of smart cities, augmented/virtual reality, driverless cars, and the “Internet of things” (IoT). Yet, despite this fanfare, there has been relatively little public discussion or analysis of the human right impacts and implications of 5G. The goal of this session is to educate participants about these differences and workshop an assessment of the opportunities that currently or will soon exist to influence the 5G roll-out to enhance positive and mitigate negative human rights impacts. This session will build on an initial session on 5G and human rights that the Global Network Initiative (GNI) organized at the Freedom Online Conference in Berlin in November 2018. A summary of that session can be found here. No expertise or prior experience on this topic is required! https://medium.com/global-network-initiative-collection/anticipating-and-addressing-human-rights-impacts-in-the-5g-environment-9de4e36ce909

Moderators
avatar for Nikki Bourassa

Nikki Bourassa

Program & Policy Officer, Global Network Initiative

Speakers
avatar for Laura Okkonen

Laura Okkonen

Senior Human Rights Manager, Vodafone
A Business & Human Rights subject matter expert working in the ICT sector. A Finn based in the UK.
avatar for Katie Shay

Katie Shay

Senior Legal Counsel, Oath
avatar for Sarvjeet Singh

Sarvjeet Singh

Executive Director, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
Sarvjeet Singh is a Co-Founder and currently the Executive Director at the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi, where he also teaches courses on cyber laws and national security laws. His work focuses on looking at the evolution of existing rights... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 2 (Laico)

9:00am

The State of Internet Shutdowns in 2019
The first 6 months of 2019 have been the worst shutdowns so far: Venezuela has systematically been blocking social media platforms for months while democratic countries like Benin have been shutting down the internet for elections. Some in the US media have written supporting social media shutdowns in Sri Lanka, while others in Senegal have been organizing to avoid shutdowns during elections. This panel discussion will bring together activists and policymakers that have worked hard to fight internet shutdowns in the past 6 months. The panelists, selected from countries that have shutdown the internet in the past 6 months, will highlight the state of internet shutdowns in 2019.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
L'Escale (Laico)

10:30am

Making Civic Tech Work for Democracy: Lessons from Tunisia, Nigeria, and Taiwan
In recent years, the rapid growth of civic technology has provided more opportunities for citizens to engage in democratic processes, leverage economic opportunities, and hold government officials accountable via e-governance platforms. Despite civic tech’s ability to bolster democratic participation and service delivery, many citizens around the globe still feel unheard by decision-makers, and valuable technology tools and platforms are still not widely placed in the hands of diverse communities to ensure inclusive engagement. This session will explore case studies from Tunisia, Nigeria, and Taiwan, as well as experiences with civic tech shared by the participants, to answer the following key questions: How can we ensure that the use of civic technology benefits all citizens, supports democracy, and upholds human rights? How can technology solutions have a multiplier effect on inclusive governance across diverse communities? What kind of technology platforms or tools have worked well to support democracy and human rights, and what has not worked well? What are the lessons learned from each case study for other countries using civic technology tools or platforms?

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Faten Ghriss

Faten Ghriss

Software Engineer, InstaDeep / Young Tunisian Coders Academy
IO

Ijeoma Ofonagoro

Programs and Operations Manager, Reboot


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
Biscay (Palais)

10:30am

Developing New Models for Censorship: The cases of the Russian RuNet, the Great Firewall of China, and Iran’s Filternet
Three countries have notorious censorship systems that have become aptly named: the RuNet, the Great Firewall, and Filternet. Russia, China and Iran have three very different governments, systems of language, and culture, yet they are exemplary countries in create their very own unique internet cultures because of the technological and legal hurdles they have placed on their users from accessing a secure and open internet. These hurdles effect the everyday lives of their countrymen, the shape and ability for dissent, as well as the respective economies of each of these countries. While these controls have taken shape, these internet cultures have strategically remained porous. With some more effort, Iranians, Russians, and Chinese can all find ways to access -however, these regimes have kept accessibility strategically at bay to never fully threaten the power structures of these authoritarian governments. Experts working on each of these countries will discuss alongside individuals representing various companies who have a strategic presence, and opportunity to improve the situation of access to the Internet. These private companies include Telegram (Iran and Russia); Facebook (Instagram in Iran, Facebook policy in China); Google (policy on China), as well as telecoms and their roles (Vodafone and MTN in Iran).

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Clarke

Sarah Clarke

Head of Europe and Central Asia, ARTICLE 19
ARTICLE 19 supports independent media, civil society and activists across the region to exercise and defend the right to freedom of expression and access to information. We challenge restrictive legislation, as well as attacks and imprisonment of individuals that violate freedom of... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Limes (Laico)

10:30am

Beyond the Hype: AI innovation and human rights in the telecoms sector
Artificial Intelligence (AI) refers to a category of computer systems which perform tasks more efficiently and make decisions with a degree of autonomy that normally require human intelligence. There is a lot of discussion around “ethical AI” at the moment, which has lead to the publication of several papers, principles and studies recently on the ethical use of AI. The purpose of this panel is to take a pragmatic perspective on how AI technology is being deployed in the telecommunications sector. We will explore the current safeguarding mechanisms on the ethical and rights respecting use of AI in telecommunications, and aim to draw best practise and evaluate whether the current mechanisms are seen as sufficient from stakeholders' perspective. Questions to be addressed: How is AI used inside the telecoms companies and in the customer interface? How can the UNGPs be applied to the design and use of AI? How should corporate transparency be defined in the use of AI? Are there overarching themes in the current corporate principles on the use of AI which could be combined into industry principles?

Moderators
avatar for Natasha Jackson

Natasha Jackson

Head of Public Policy & Consumer Affairs, GSMA

Speakers
LB

Lisl Brunner

Director, Global Public Policy, AT&T
NM

Nathalie Maréchal

Senior research analyst, Ranking Digital Rights
Corporate transparency & accountability; surveillance capitalism; targeted advertising business models; artificial intelligence & human rights
avatar for Laura Okkonen

Laura Okkonen

Senior Human Rights Manager, Vodafone
A Business & Human Rights subject matter expert working in the ICT sector. A Finn based in the UK.
MO

Moira Oliver

Head of Policy & Chief Counsel, Human/Digital Rights, BT
I'm BT's lawyer and head of policy for human rights - responsible for our programme to implement the UNGPs in our business.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Oya 1 (Laico)

10:30am

Machine Learning 101 for Human Rights Activists: Everything you wanted to know about machine learning but were afraid to ask
This presentation will include two parts: 1) a thorough description of our hate speech research, and 2) a code demo guiding participants to understand basic methods of machine learning for hate-related textual data. Our hate speech research integrates item response theory with deep learning to accurately track levels of hate speech on social media over time, a novel methodology with major promise for computational social science. Our code tutorial will then empower attendees through interactive learning to build and interpret machine learning models that can be applied to text on social media for their own research and activism.

Speakers
avatar for Claudia von Vacano

Claudia von Vacano

Executive Director, University of California, Berkeley
Dr. Claudia von Vacano is the Executive Director of the Social Science Data Lab known as the D-Lab http://dlab.berkeley.edu/ and the Digital Humanities http://dh.berkeley.edu/ at the University of California, Berkeley, and is on the board of the Social Science Matrix http://matrix.berkeley.edu... Read More →
avatar for Chris Kennedy

Chris Kennedy

PhD student and consulting data scientist, D-Lab & Biostatistics at the University of California, Berkeley
Our team has developed a new paradigm of artificial intelligence for online hate speech with unparalleled accuracy & granularity. I am hoping to meet with others working on hate speech / violent extremism / radicalization / genocide and would love to 1) hear about your work, offer... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Hannibal (Laico)

10:30am

Change the Terms: Approaches for addressing a new era of hate online
This session aims to bring together experts in right-wing extremism and academics who study the role of the internet in propagating extremism to engage with an audience of internet company leaders, regulators, and civil society organizations dealing with the impact of toxic online content on their constituents. The workshop will feature a presentation of policy recommendations from a coalition of more than 50 civil rights organizations designed to address hateful activity on online platforms. These policy recommendations come on the heels of another year of deadly violence from the far-right, much of which can be linked to online pathways. Online propaganda hubs are the new normal when it comes to how hate groups recruit and radicalize new members. These hubs include websites and forums, but are now more commonly comprised of social media platforms and chat services. The increasingly decentralized nature of online recruitment and radicalization makes the monitoring and tracking of these organizations and individuals more difficult than ever before. This places a new importance on online companies to adopt effective policies and procedures for mitigating the threat they pose.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Heidi Beirich

Heidi Beirich

Director, Intelligence Project, Southern Poverty Law Center
I run the SPLC's program that tracks the activities of right-wing extremists in the US and abroad.
avatar for Henry Fernandez

Henry Fernandez

Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
Henry Fernandez is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, where he writes, researches and develops policies on civil rights, immigrant justice, the internet, elections and urban communities.
avatar for Gaurav Laroia

Gaurav Laroia

Policy Counsel, Free Press
avatar for Megan Squire

Megan Squire

Professor of Computer Science, Elon University
Inventing techniques for massive, passive data mining and OSINT to understand extremism and hate in online spaces.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Carthage 1 (Laico)

10:30am

Global State of Data Protection
After the entry into application of the GDPR in the European Union, we have seen that a large number of countries are either upgrading their data protection and privacy laws or considering norms for the first time. This session is an opportunity for participants to share updates on ongoing developments on data protection around the world and discuss possibilities for NGOs to support each others works, share experiences, resources and materials.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Afsaneh Rigot

Afsaneh Rigot

ARTICLE 19
Afsaneh Rigot is a researcher looking at the nexus of law, technology, LGBTQ, refugee and human rights issues.She is a research fellow at Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. She also works with ARTICLE 19 on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) t... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Carthage 3 (Laico)

10:30am

Enabling Digital Civic Space: A Conversation with UN Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association, Clement Voule
This session will be an opportunity for Clement Voule, the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association to: (a) present his findings from his report addressing the protection and promotion of the freedoms of peaceful assembly and association in the digital era, and (b) invite strategic ideas from civil society and the private sector regarding how to implement recommendations to protect these fundamental freedoms. (Special Rapporteur Voule’s report will be presented at the 41st session of the Human Rights Council.)

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Clément Nyaletsossi Voule

Clément Nyaletsossi Voule

Special Rapporteur on Rights to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and of Association, United Nations
Clément Nyaletsossi VOULE, a national from Togo, has been appointed as United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and of Association in March 2018. Prior to his appointment, he led the International Service for Human Rights (ISHR) work to support... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Caspian (Palais)

10:30am

Hey, That’s My Vote! The Emerging Science of Digital Election Observation
What can we do to keep elections free and fair in the age of digitization? And how can the tech rights community get involved with election observation in their own countries and around the world? This session will serve as a fast track introduction to election monitoring for a human rights and public interest audience. We’ll hear from the people who make observation missions happen and discover current solutions, emerging challenges, and innovations in each space with a focus on developing, transitional and conflict countries. We’ll then take a deep-dive into real-world case studies from each of the two communities: How has the #KeepItOn coalition been tracking internet shutdowns during elections, and how does that contrast with the work of media monitoring missions? Where has technology worked and has where it failed to serve the voting public during the last year? The audience is invited to join in and throw their own ideas and solutions into the mix.

Moderators
avatar for Christel Dahlskjaer

Christel Dahlskjaer

CCO, Private Internet Access
Christel Dahlskjaer is the CCO of Private Internet Access, a leading VPN service provider specialising in secure, encrypted VPN tunnels which create several layers of privacy and security to help users stay safe on the internet. She is keen on community, privacy and freedom of expression... Read More →

Speakers
SM

Sarah Moulton

National Democratic Institute
avatar for Alp Toker

Alp Toker

Executive Director, NetBlocks
Alp is founder of the netblocks.org digital rights initiative and award-winning Turkey Blocks collective, and Sakharov Fellow for Freedom of Thought with the European Parliament. He works on freedom of expression online, digital transparency and policy tooling for internet governance... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
L'Escale (Laico)

10:30am

Seeing through the rubble: using crowdsourcing, data and field work to investigate civilian deaths in Raqqa, Syria
The 6th of June marks the two years anniversary since the beginning of the “war of annihilation”, a US-led Coalition military campaign to oust the armed group calling itself Islamic State from Raqqa, Syria. Four months of relentless bombardment killed and injured thousands of civilians and reduced homes, businesses and infrastructure to rubble. Amnesty and Airwars have teamed up and conducted the most comprehensive investigation into civilian deaths in a modern conflict. The investigation, collating multiple data streams, gave a brutally vivid account of more than 1,600 civilian lives lost as a direct result of thousands of US, UK and French air strikes and tens of thousands of US artillery strikes. This session will showcase how a team of investigators at Amnesty and Airwars supported by thousands of digital volunteers from around the world pieced together evidence such as field investigations, satellite images, thousands of user-generated videos and social media reports in one of the most comprehensive accounts of the Raqqa war. The panel will discuss challenges and opportunities for using multi-dimensional investigations for advocacy and change making, as well as the importance of preserving the 'digital memory' of modern conflicts that are increasingly monitored by civilians on the ground.

Moderators
avatar for Milena Marin

Milena Marin

Senior Advisor for Tactical Research, Amnesty International
I have over ten years’ experience working at the intersection of technology, data and social good on issues like human rights, public sector transparency, anti-corruption and open data. Currently, I am with Amnesty’s Evidence Lab, where I work on complex human rights investigations... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Dyer

Sophie Dyer

Researcher and designer, Independent
#OSINT #Archives #RemoteSensing #Documentation Sophie's research focuses on open source, remote and visual investigations. Over the last two years she has worked with the conflict monitor, Airwars, to reconcile civilian casualty allegations with belligerent reporting, via direct engagement... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Village Stage (Laico)

10:30am

Terrorist online content regulations in Europe and beyond: changing the platform liability paradigm?
The approximate structure of the session will be the following: - Opening remarks on the most relevant legislative anti-terrorist proposals (at the EU level and beyond) and their contrast with international standards and most important regional liability exemption regimes. - Reflection on the effectiveness of legislative measures introducing responsibility provisions vis-a-vis platforms regarding terrorist online content. This approach will be provided by anti-terrorist expert(s), using the experience of international security organizations and national law enforcement bodies. - Presentation of cases of national legislation and its effects in different regions of the world (mainly South East Asia, Europe and Latin America). After these presentations, participants in the audience will be asked to share and discuss specific cases, experiences and approaches. The panel aims at fostering a debate that shall combine a human rights and international standards approach together with a proper consideration of the adequate tools to effectively deal with terrorist online content, with the aim of defining best possible models. The debate will also identify global and regional tendencies aiming at transforming the general liability system applicable to online platforms, and possible actions and efforts to properly tackle these tendencies and adequately understand the impact on freedom of expression.

Moderators
avatar for Joan Barata

Joan Barata

Intermediary Liability Fellow, Stanford CIS
I am the Intermediary Liability Fellow at Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. As a scholar, I have spoken and done extensive research in the areas of freedom of expression, freedom of information, media and platform regulation, working and collaborating with various... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Deniz Yazici

Deniz Yazici

Adviser, Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media
avatar for Hadiya Masieh

Hadiya Masieh

Founder and CEO, Groundswell Project
Hadiya Masieh is an expert consultant in the area of community cohesion, interfaith relations, counter extremism, and women’s involvement in extremism and radicalisation. Her experience spans over 22 years. She has been a counter extremism consultant for various Governments and... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Dheere

Jessica Dheere

Founder/Executive Director, SMEX
I'm the co-founder and executive director of the Beirut, Lebanon–based SMEX (smex.org), the Middle East and North Africa’s leading digital rights research and policy advocacy organization. I'm also a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and the Carr Center... Read More →
avatar for Virginia Pérez-Alonso

Virginia Pérez-Alonso

President, Plataforma en Defensa de la Libertad de Información (PDLI)
Chair of the PDLI, deputy editor-in-chief at Spanish news website Público and a member of IPI’s Executive Board. Happy to talk about journalism innovation, newsrooms managing, newsrooms integration and transformation, digital first, transparency in journalism, freedom of speech... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Leptis (Laico)

10:30am

There's No Party Like a CryptoParty?
The demand for in-person digital security workshops is increasing. Many of these workshops are inspired by the CryptoParty format, which emphasizes the importance of making these gatherings public and free. The CryptoParty movement provides a decentralized opportunity to demystify security technology & approaches while also providing space to implement those practices and approaches in a supportive environment. These gatherings explore the fundamentals of building your own personal security framework in ways that make participants feel accompanied and supported. But are these gatherings working towards building a sustainable digital security culture? Is the focus of personal digital security neglecting systemic issues? In this participatory and collaborative session, we want to explore best practices and challenges in organizing these kinds of events. This includes targeted and non-targeted outreach, creating safe space, how to address community agreement violations, building capacity while organizing events, and re-framing methods to focus on empowerment and agency rather than fear and intimidation. Come with stories to share and ideas that incorporate fun and joy in this work. We will edit the CryptoParty wiki for others outside this session to follow along.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Oya 3 (Laico)

10:30am

2018 Human Rights Heroes Awards
Every year, Access Now celebrates heroes of human rights in the digital age from around the world who have made a unique contribution to the fight against overreaching surveillance and defending privacy. The award started as a way to celebrate the impact of the Necessary and Proportionate Principles — a set of guidelines governments must follow to ensure any electronic surveillance program fully respects human rights — and is now in its fifth year.


In recognition of their amazing work in 2018, we are very proud to honor:

  • Mohammed Al-Maskati, Digital Security Trainer, Bahrain
  • Lizzie O'Shea, Lawyer, Australia
  • Zaituni Njovu, Zaina Foundation, Tanzania
  • Dr. Usha Ramanathan, Researcher & Activist, on behalf of Aadhaar Petitioners and Litigators, India
  • Marianne Díaz Hernández, Lawyer & Researcher, Derechos Digitales, Venezuela

We are also pleased to welcome special guest U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet to join us in recognizing our 2018 Human Rights Heroes.

You can learn more about the award, its history, and each of this year's recipients here.

Speakers
avatar for Brett Solomon

Brett Solomon

Co-Founder and Executive Director, Access Now
Brett is the Executive Director of Access Now, defending and extending the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining innovative policy, global advocacy, and direct technical support, RightsCon and grant-making, Access Now fights for human rights in the digital... Read More →
avatar for Marianne Díaz Hernández

Marianne Díaz Hernández

Public Policy Analyst, Derechos Digitales
Marianne Diaz is a Venezuelan lawyer, digital rights activist and fiction writer, currently based in Santiago, Chile. Her work focuses mainly on issues regarding online freedom of speech, web filtering, internet infrastructure and digital security. She founded the digital rights NGO... Read More →
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now
avatar for Lizzie O'Shea

Lizzie O'Shea

Board members, Digital Rights Watch
Digital Rights Watch Australia
avatar for Mohammed Al-Maskati

Mohammed Al-Maskati

human rights activist and digital security consultant, Front Line Defenders for MENA
Mohammed Abdulnabi al-Maskati is a Bahraini human rights activist and digital security consultant with Front Line Defenders for Middle East and North Africa. He is the founder of the Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights, a leading group in the 2011-2012 Bahraini uprising.
avatar for Michelle Bachelet

Michelle Bachelet

On September 1, 2018 Michelle Bachelet assumed her functions as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.  The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights was established in 1993 and Ms. Bachelet is the seventh Commissioner.Ms. Bachelet was elected President of... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
The BeeHive (Palais)

10:30am

Defense Against the Dark Arts: Meme Campaigns and Propaganda
In this panel and workshop, we will hear from three experts in memetics and politics. It will begin with a panel discussion amongst the participants. Sage Cheng is the Design and UX Lead at Access Now, and she has developed countless digital media campaigns and design strategies in the context of civil society. Caroline Sinders is the author of the Pepe Archive, a web archive commissioned by Rhizome. Wafaa Heikal serves as research and communications associate at Meedan, where their software is used to analyze and catalog internet memes. The panel will then turn into a workshop, focused on creative practices for both utilizing memes and defending against memes designed to attack, distract or confuse. Attendees with workshop a campaign and then be asked to develop a meaningful response to an attempt to attack or co-opt their campaign. The facilitators will help organize different scenarios and useful responses. Afterward, we will come together as a big group to catalog lessons learned, open questions and specific paths forward.

Moderators
Speakers
M

Meedan

Meedan builds digital tools for global journalism and translation. We are a team of designers, technologists and journalists who focus on open source investigation of digital media and crowdsourced translation of social media.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Elydhafa (Laico)

10:30am

From Call to Action: Visions for a Contract for the Web
In November 2018, Tim-Berners Lee put out a call for companies, governments, and civil society to work together on a Contract for the Web. The Web Foundation has taken up that call to coordinate a range of discussions across different thematic areas – access, openness, data privacy, positive tech – to set guidelines and accountability standards for supporting better industry practices and public regulations for the digital age. We're excited to share our progress and also want to get wider feedback on what you think it should be! We'll update you on the Contract's development and then breakout into thematic groups, led by key stakeholders drafting the Contract itself, to give you a chance to input on its development, suggest standards for inclusion in the final text, and set goals for the digital rights community to keep accountability standards high and effective to instigate meaningful change from the web we have to the web we want.

Moderators
avatar for Teddy Woodhouse

Teddy Woodhouse

Research Analyst & Advocate, World Wide Web Foundation
Teddy is a research analyst and advocate at the Web Foundation working on digital access and inclusion. He believes in the open web as a space for social solidarity and free expression. He first joined the Foundation in early 2016 and has supported the team’s ongoing policy work... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alex Walden

Alex Walden

Global Policy Lead for Human Rights & Free Expression, Google
Alex Walden leads Google’s work on free expression and human rights on the international policy team. Her work includes representing Google in the Global Network Initiative (GNI) and in various multilateral fora dealing with controversial content. Alex joined Google from The Raben... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Carthage 2 (Laico)

10:30am

Protecting the Integrity of the Global Information Space
Media freedom is in decline worldwide. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, the number of journalists jailed for their work is at the highest level since the 1990s. Digital technologies have brought significant social, political, and economic changes. Given the democratic value of the global information ecosystem as a shared public good, there is a renewed need to safeguard its integrity. Given these concurrent problems, efforts to advance media freedom must seek to protect both the media’s right to speak and the public’s need to access information of public interest and value, in order to exercise their democratic rights.

Canada will be co-hosting with the UK the upcoming Global Conference for Media Freedom in London on July 10 to 11, 2019. This session, moderated by Canada’s Ambassador to Tunisia, Carol McQueen, will seek the views of international civil society organizations on how the Government of Canada should shape the agenda for the upcoming conference and what concrete outcomes we should be working towards to ensure the relevance and success of the event as a meaningful step in advancing progress to protect media freedom.

The conference in July will explore opportunities to advance the safety of journalists and media professionals, the integrity of the evolving global information ecosystem, and media freedom as an essential element of the development agenda. We seek to strengthen the rules-based international order, human rights, and democratic resilience by enhancing cooperation in addressing threats to media freedom, highlighting the achievements of countries taking steps to protect media freedom, and addressing disinformation while strengthening the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Celtic (Palais)

10:30am

Public Broadcasting in the Age of Censorship
Just as the rise of the global communications network in the end of the last century provided many opportunities to worldwide media organisations, the recent global decline in online freedom and the increasing sophistication of internet censorship techniques presents an unprecedented challenge to international broadcasters. In this session, members of the Internet Freedom working group of the DG7, a group of publicly funded international media organisations, will present how they are adapting to these challenges, present bypasscensorship.org, and discuss oppurtunities presented by technological developments in internet infrastructure. The session will be structured as a fireside chat with representatives from the anti-censorship divisions of those international media organisations, as well as some members of civil society experiencing highly repressive censorship, and a censorship circumvention technology expert.

Moderators
avatar for Arzu Geybullayeva

Arzu Geybullayeva

Journalist, Freelance
Regional analyst, correspondent, and columnist. Former Vaclav Havel Journalism Fellow at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFERL) and Central Asia Azerbaijan Fellow at George Washington University. Main areas of interest include human rights, advocacy, press freedom, and more recently... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Julian Cable

Julian Cable

Lead Architect, World Service Distribution, BBC
We do what we can to provide verified and impartial news and information for everyone everywhere. Part of my role is to provide technology options both within our organisation and for our audiences to exercise the right to information.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Cyrene (Laico)

10:30am

Working it out - journalism in the digital area : why we need an international pledge for Information and Democracy now more than ever
Information disorder is the new normal, and a troubling sign that democracy itself is under threat. These last few years have seen the active role played by despotic regimes in developing intricate propaganda machines which have been effective in silencing dissent, locally, nationally and in some cases, globally, while repressing freedom of expression. Around the world, press freedom predators are building a closed, censored, and tracked internet, while blocking external content. Democracies are undermined by these attacks, the spread of disinformation and misinformation. Online harassment against journalists is used as a weapon to drown reliable journalistic reporting and intimidate dissident voices. Today, Reporters without Borders is launching an appeal to mobilize all those who are committed to defending a free and pluralistic public space, which is essential for democracy, 70 years after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted in Paris.

Moderators
avatar for Elodie Vialle

Elodie Vialle

Head of Journalism and Technology desk, Reporters without Borders
Identifying new threats that undermine the freedom of information l Knight-Wallace Fellow’20. Working on countering online attacks against female journalists.

Speakers
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is the ​Founder and executive director of the Digital Rights Foundation (DRF), Pakistan, She has run the DRF since it was established in 2012, and has been a practicing lawyer since 2007, where she worked on civil​,​ criminal​ and now cyber​ litigation... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Jelsa (Laico)

10:30am

Unlocking the Potential for Digital Technology to Enable Human Rights
The Global Enabling Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) has published a report on Enabling Rights, showing the potential of digital technology to enable civil, political, and economic rights. Building on the report findings, the goal of this session will be to coordinate the collective capabilities of digital technology industry leaders and human rights professionals and social innovators to accelerate and scale up the development and application of technology enabling human rights. The workshop will be on the role digital technology can perform in protecting civil, political, and economic rights across a range of issues such as enhancing supplier accountability and empowering workers to protect their rights; addressing human trafficking; supporting traceability; protecting land rights; and bringing those that abuse human rights to justice. The Workshop will discuss ways technology can support these rights; discuss on how to effectively develop technology solutions; and discuss ways to ensure that technology is developed in a way that accounts for and respects human rights.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Altschuller

Sarah Altschuller

Business & Human Rights Counsel, Verizon

Speakers
avatar for Scott Edwards

Scott Edwards

Senior Adviser, Amnesty International
Scott Edwards is a Senior Adviser at Amnesty International. He has written and worked extensively on complex humanitarian crises, protection, and armed conflict. His current professional activity focuses on innovations in human rights compliance monitoring, and the human rights implications... Read More →
avatar for Vijay Simhan

Vijay Simhan

Manager, Investments, Humanity United
As Investments Manager, Vijay supports Humanity United’s Human Trafficking & Labor Migration portfolio, including engaging with corporations, governments, civil society, and workers to advocate, promote, and defend the rights of workers.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Adean (Palais)

10:30am

Making Regulatory Waves: A discussion on the need for collaborative spectrum management policy development
Currently, spaces for spectrum management policy development are designed to be limited to the participation of national regulators. As a result, there is little opportunity for other stakeholders to contribute their expertise to the development of innovative, rights-respecting policy approaches to overcoming entrenched obstacles to efficiency and connectivity in current spectrum management practices. Therefore, the main goal of this session is to bring regulators in conversation with experts in academia and civil society to exchange best practices and policy experiences on some of the major issues impacting the spectrum market today.

Moderators
avatar for Maureen Hernandez

Maureen Hernandez

Fellow on Access, Article19.
Internet access. ICT4D

Speakers
avatar for Sofie Maddens

Sofie Maddens

Head ITU/BDT/RME, ITU
avatar for Steve Song

Steve Song

Fellow, Mozilla Foundation


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Oya 2 (Laico)

10:30am

Solve My Problem: Indigenous Data Sovereignty
RightsCon Solve My Problem sessions will provide an opportunity for representatives from diverse stakeholder groups and regions to come together around a defined problem within the human rights and technology space and devise strategies, actions, and solutions. The identified problem is either associated with one of the major tracks in the RightsCon program or is a linking issue that requires different sets of skills to be addressed.

Open data principles are currently in contradiction to IDS principles that protect Indigenous and ethnic minority rights to data ownership and sovereignty. Moreover, several data initiatives around the world are creating projects around Indigenous data without considering the principles of IDS.

Failure to consider IDS principles will deepen inequities, devalue Indigenous knowledge and expertise, and perpetuate colonial mentalities and infrastructures.

Moderators
avatar for Alejandro Mayoral Banos

Alejandro Mayoral Banos

Executive Director, Indigenous Friends Association
Alejandro Mayoral Banos is an Indigenous activist and Ph.D.Candidate, who is currently working with organizations in Canada and Mexico deploying participatory and community-driven ICT projects by/with/for Indigenous peoples. He is the creator and founder of the Indigenous Friends... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Justin Wiebe

Justin Wiebe

Program Manager, Mastercard Foundation
Justin Wiebe is Michif (Métis) from Saskatoon in Treaty 6 and Métis Territory, and currently lives in Toronto in territories covered by the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant. Justin is passionate about inclusive city-building that centers reconciliation, youth leadership... Read More →
avatar for Pyrou Chung

Pyrou Chung

Senior Adviser, Ewmi Open Development Initiative
I am the Senior Advisor at the Open Development Initiative (ODI) a project of the East West Management Institute (EWMI) and manage their natural resource, land and data initiatives in Southeast Asia. I have expertise in ecology and sustainable development and my work is focused in... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
El Jem (Laico)

12:00pm

RightsCon Info Session: Where to start?
Is this your first time at RightsCon? Feeling overwhelmed? Come to this session to meet members of the RightsCon team, ask questions, and get help!

Speakers
avatar for Nikki Gladstone

Nikki Gladstone

RightsCon Program and Community Manager, Access Now
Nikki works on RightsCon, the world's leading summit on human rights in the digital age. She is excited about creating inclusive and accessible spaces for the digital rights community to drive change. Before Access Now, Nikki worked with the Wilson Center's Digital Futures Project... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Harper

Sarah Harper

RightsCon Program Associate, Access Now


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Oya 2 (Laico)

12:00pm

Women’s right to artistic freedom of expression in the digital age
Access to online platforms enables women to transgress physical boundaries and connect with audiences across the world. However, this is typically compounded by online misogynistic and vitriolic gendered harassment and abuse. Freemuse's first-of-its-kind report into women’s right to artistic freedom in the digital age indicates that women feel coerced into restricting their opinions and art on social media platforms and websites due to the high probability of online abuse. Our RightsCon session will present recommendations from Freemuse's report directed towards various actors in the international community, artists and digital companies, and will analyze international/national policy frameworks in parallel with community guidelines presented by online platforms to ascertain the legal foundation of the harassment towards women in the digital age. The session will discuss the role of community guidelines in restricting women’s right to artistic freedom, the challenges for the international community to hold digital companies accountable, and human rights law facilitating restrictions for women’s artistic freedom in the digital world. Speakers include David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression; Deji Olukotun, Head of Social Impact at Sonos; Srirak Plipat, Executive Director of Freemuse; a woman artist and a human rights expert in the field of digital rights.

Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Jelsa (Laico)

12:00pm

Lightning Talks: Exploring the complex world of artificial intelligence
When AI for good goes bad (Access Now)

Description: In this lightning talk, I will present the European artificial intelligence policy debate and debunk the buzzwords around it: I'll touch on the political and substantive components with a primary focus on Europe but including global examples. As one of the members, I'll present the work of the EU's High Level Expert Group on Artificial Intelligence. This will include a short summary and a critique of the published Ethics Guidelines on Trustworthy AI and the status of the remaining deliverable of the group. I will summarize Access Now's policy recommendations on artificial intelligence and human rights.

Speaker: Fanny Hidvégi

Let’s pry open that black box together! How we crowdsourced an external audit of Germany’s most powerful credit scoring system - and why the scoring company didn't love us for it (AlgorithmWatch)

Description: 
In this Lightning Talk, I'd like to present how we scrutinized Germany’s leading credit scoring company, SCHUFA. SCHUFA has immense power over people’s lives; whether with regard to loan or credit card applications, acceptance of post-paid calling plans, housing allocation or Internet contracts. But what if your SCHUFA score is low because there are mistakes in your credit history data? Or if the score is calculated by a mathematical model that is flawed? To find out, we started a large crowdsourcing experiment, asking people to donate money to make the whole thing possible, to request their SCHUFA scores (which the company is required by law to send them) - and to "donate" their scores to us, so we can analyze them – and they did! I will provide details about how we set up the campaign, the technology we developed, how the cooperation with partners worked – especially the journalists we teamed up with and why this was a secret to success – but also our own shortcomings and mistakes. I will show our hilarious campaign video! And I will discuss all of this with the participants in an interactive way.

Speaker: 
Matthias Spielkamp

AI and Human Rights: dilemma of host countries and AI giant companies (Iranian Central Bar Association)

Description: In 2018 many documents and report tried to answer to the question "Can the international human rights framework effectively inform, shape, and govern AI research, development, and deployment"? The primary duty bearers of human rights are States. Principally, states are not responsible strictly for private actions of private persons or entities. State responsibility may arise where the State fails to fulfill its obligation to protect its people or the people under its jurisdiction.The duty of the State to protect against human rights abuses by third parties, including business enterprises, through appropriate policies, regulation and adjudication, and the need for greater access by victims to effective remedy, both judicial and non judicial. International human rights law does not explicitly require States to police business activities outside their national jurisdiction. The rights holders of human rights are individuals finding themselves within the jurisdiction of the State parties. With regard to above mentioned legal arguments the solution is drafting national laws with regard to human rights values for applying more control on such AI giant companies. what we can call "Human Rights By Design."

Speaker: Ameneh Dehshiri



Speakers
avatar for Ameneh Dehshiri

Ameneh Dehshiri

Lawyer, PhD. International Human Rights law
Iranian digital rights researcher
avatar for Matthias Spielkamp

Matthias Spielkamp

Founder and Executive Director, AlgorithmWatch
Matthias Spielkamp is co-founder and executive director of AlgorithmWatch. He is co-founder and publisher of the online magazine iRights.info (Grimme Online Award 2006). He testified before several committees of the German Bundestag, i.e. on AI and robotics. Matthias serves on the governing board of the German section of Reporters Without Borders and the... Read More →
avatar for Fanny Hidvégi

Fanny Hidvégi

European Policy Manager, Access Now
Fanny (@infofannny) is Access Now’s European Policy Manager based in Brussels. Previously, Fanny was International Privacy Fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. where she focused on E.U.-U.S. data transfers. For three years Fanny led the Freedom... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

12:00pm

Tech Demos: Blowing the Whistle – Data leaks and digital dropboxes
Detecting personal data leaks to third party actors with website and app analysis methodology (Fundación Karisma)

Speakers: Stéphane Labarthe

The session would show how we could detect personal data leaks - including names, identity numbers and even login and passwords - to third party actors (advertising companies, analytics, etc.) in the analyze of data flow from websites and apps. We will present some examples based on recent researches on governmental websites and apps. We would like to conclude that this is not a problem concerning only the big platforms like Facebook or Google but a general topic which concerns all websites and apps when developers include external source code without being able to control it. This demotech follows our previous presentation in RightsCon 2017 and 2018 (“DiYKit - How to analyse Websites” and “DiYKit: How to analyz e privacy and security on smartphone apps”). The activities planned in the session are: 1) short presentation of the data flow analysis of the methodology; 2) examples of recent flows analysis showing dataleaks to third parties concerning one smartphone app and one or two websites ; 3) short debate and exchanges about it. Interactivity would be promoted by exchanges and debates in this third part and would enable to listen possible solutions a best practices to mitigate the risk we identified.

Predicting & Preventing Mass Atrocities (Hala Systems)

Description: Hala Systems is a social enterprise that uses artificial intelligence, remote sensing, and the internet of things to save lives in conflict zones, to combat disinformation, and to bring accountability for war crimes. Hala created an early warning system for airstrikes against civilians in Syria that provides 7-10 minutes of warning on average. We estimate that it reaches up to 2.3 million people, has saved hundreds of lives, and has prevented thousands of injuries. In this session, we will provide an overview of the system design and how all of these technologies converge into a single product. The talk will feature a video testimonial from civilians in Syria, as well as a brief demo of our technology. The discussion will also include our vision for the future: new capabilities, new types of threats, new geographic deployments, new local partners, etc.

Speakers: Dave Levin and Saghar Hamidzade

VIRT-EU: a toolkit for incorporating privacy and ethics in technical design (Open Rights Group)

Speakers: Javier Ruiz  

The VIRT-EU project consortium has developed various tools to help developers incorporate ethical and privacy considerations in their products. This session will showcase some of those tools to help work with values and priorities, and to assess the impact of their products. Participants will learn critical approaches to mainstream technology ethics, understand the general principles of impact assessment and will explore some tools available.

Moderators
JS

Jonah Sheridan

Information Ecology
Information Ecology, LLC, brings together social justice values and technical chops; our work is tempered by whole-systems sensibilities, rooted in years of alliance with grassroots and direct action organizations, forged in classrooms and datacenters, and enriched by time spent studying... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Javier Ruiz

Javier Ruiz

Policy Director, javier@openrightsgroup.org
I work on a broad range of digital rights policy, from privacy and surveillance to copyright and technology ethics.
avatar for Dave Levin

Dave Levin

Co-Founder & COO, Hala Systems
avatar for Saghar Hamidzade

Saghar Hamidzade

Hala Systems
Use of technology for civilian protection in Syria
avatar for Stéphane Labarthe

Stéphane Labarthe

Expert in digital security and privacy, Fundación Karisma (Colombia)


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Village Stage (Laico)

12:00pm

The Digital Language Divide: Why Prioritizing Underrepresented Languages Matters.
The Internet is a powerful catalyst for social change, bringing new opportunities for sharing information and connecting social movements across continents. Access to these resources is a key determinant to socioeconomic opportunities, but many communities are met with constant language barriers as they navigate the Internet -- limiting the scope of the information available to them. As policymakers continue to address the growing digital divide, special attention must be paid to underrepresented language users who are continually relegated to the peripheries of the Internet. What obstacles do underrepresented language communities face as a result of their online exclusion? And what role can policymakers, developers, and activists play to bring linguistic diversity to the forefront? Our panel discussion brings together key stakeholders to shed light on the challenges they face, both as Internet users and as individuals working to promote their languages online. The session will discuss issues from digital security risks and economic obstacles to technical challenges when incorporating languages with no script and creating keyboards with new font types. We will also discuss the ways that communities are successfully leveraging technology to preserve and promote language.

Moderators
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Founder & Director, Localization Lab
Dragana Kaurin is a human rights researcher and ethnographer working at the intersection of technology, human rights and migration. She is the founder and executive director of Localization Lab, a non-profit organization that works on technology adoption with local communities, research... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Surman

Mark Surman

Executive Director, Mozilla Foundation
The web is one of our most valuable public resources — it’s Mark Surman’s job to protect it. Mark serves as Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation, a global community that does everything from making Firefox to taking stands on issues like online privacy. Mark’s biggest... Read More →
avatar for Nwachukwu Egbunike

Nwachukwu Egbunike

Community Manager Sub-Saharan Africa, Global Voices
My scholarly and journalist writings revolves around social media, politics/ political participation, online free speech and ethnicity. I am the author of "Hashtags: social media, politics and ethnicity in Nigeria".
avatar for Kristen Tcherneshoff

Kristen Tcherneshoff

Director of Community, Wikitongues
kristen@wikitongues.orgKristen Tcherneshoff is the Director of Community at Wikitongues, where she works alongside more than 1,500 volunteers and language activists from around the world. With a background in law and disability rights, her interests lie in language activism and sign... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Adean (Palais)

12:00pm

Future-Proofing Human Rights Documentation: Tools for Protecting Endangered Evidence
This panel will bring together those working in various capacities in the human rights field including advocates, lawyers, technologists, usability experts, archivists, and others interested in creating tools and standards and increasing their adoption in the wider community towards the common goal of holding abusers accountable through the ethical collection and preservation of evidentiary media. Our panel will be highly participatory where we will share our experiences, perspectives, and use cases of how community & larger organizations, such as Human Rights Watch, are integral in the evolution of emergent tools like OpenArchive and ProofMode to standardize workflows, create and securely share, and preserve documentation they collect from the field. We will discuss the research and development process, threat models, state of technology, and learn more about the challenges attendees face around media collection/preservation/access. We will focus on knowledge sharing, interaction, engagement, and feedback that will help inform the evolution of OpenArchive, SecureDrop, Guardian Project, Meedan, WITNESS’ projects, and others. It will be a group-based discussion, where we will share our different areas of expertise within the human rights open source technological landscape and learn about the participants’ backgrounds and needs, followed by a discussion of opportunities and challenges.

Moderators
Speakers
M

Meedan

Meedan builds digital tools for global journalism and translation. We are a team of designers, technologists and journalists who focus on open source investigation of digital media and crowdsourced translation of social media.
DK

Dia Kayyali

Program Manager, tech + advocacy, WITNESS
Dia Kayyali coordinates WITNESS’ tech + advocacy work, engaging with technology companies and working on tools and policies that help human rights advocates safely, securely and ethically document human rights abuses and expose them to the world.
avatar for Natalie Cadranel

Natalie Cadranel

Founder & Director, OpenArchive
Natalie is the founder and director of OpenArchive, a free, open-source mobile--archive project for those managing sensitive mobile media. Leveraging the efforts of the Internet Archive, Tor, the Guardian Project, and Creative Commons, this media ecosystem gives history's first responders... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Oya 1 (Laico)

12:00pm

Cyberstability and Human Rights: Friends or Foes? An Interactive Dialogue with the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace
The session will start with a short presentation on the GCSC and the norms it has developed to help achieve a stable and secure cyberspace. Speakers from the digital rights and cybersecurity research communities will then provide their perspectives on the work of the commission followed by dialogue with people in the room. The second part of the workshop will look at the future of the norms and principles developed by the Commission and related processes (such as the Group of Governmental Experts) and consider how they can be adopted, and tracked. The opportunities presented by the current cyber and information security- related processes of the United Nations General Assembly's First Committee (the Open Ended Working Group and the Group of Government Experts) will be explored. This will be followed by moderated open dialogue and debate. The cross- cutting question the workshop will address is how digital rights relate to stability and security in cyberspace.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Abdul-Hakeem Ajijola (AhA)

Abdul-Hakeem Ajijola (AhA)

Chair, Consultancy Support Services (CS2) Ltd
Core competencies are : Cybersecurity, Virtual Libraries & Technology Policy


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Elyssa (Laico)

12:00pm

Let's Get Playin': A demo of SMEX's board game on online mobile safety
Participants will play Proxy, the board game that SMEX has developed to teach Lebanese youth about privacy and security. The game, which debuted at MozFest and will have been played by various groups of young people in Lebanon prior to RightsCon, is a competition between a “hacker” and a team of three activists, each with a unique identity and skillset. The activists win when they work together to reach three “safety levels” and the hacker wins if he outwits them first by obtaining three types of personally identifying information (GPS Location, Mobile Pin/Passphrase, and Email Password) about each activist. In our 90-minute session, groups of 4 will play the game for the first 65 minutes (15 minutes to explain, 50 minutes of playing time); during the last 25 minutes, we will elicit feedback about our specific game, but also discuss the core digital safety issues that board games and other offline tools can help address.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Limes (Laico)
  • Host Organization SMEX

12:00pm

Privacy in Employer-Employee Relationships: The grey areas in workers’ rights to privacy protection and employers’ legitimate interests
The use of diverse technologies as a means to improve work conditions and increase productivity has been embraced steadily by various industries and sectors all over the world. This has transformed privacy boundaries in employer-employee relationships. The right to privacy admits certain limits or restrictions, particularly when obligations are assumed within a work relationship. But this cannot be considered an unrestricted excuse to invade the private sphere of employees or to treat their personal data inappropriately. There are many grey areas, especially when the working conditions are not clear and when neither employers nor employees know the scope of its functions. This panel will analyze challenges around these tensions, focusing on the opinions on processing personal data in the workplace issued by the European Data Protection Board, which provides a basis for reassessing the balance between the legitimate interests of employers and reasonable expectations of workers' privacy. Speakers will analyze to the criteria that both the European Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights have used to determine the scope and limits of employers’ legitimate interests and whether these can be translated to different contexts and local legislation in countries like Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay and Perú.

Moderators
JM

Judith Mariscal

CIDE
Centro de Investgacion y Docencia Economica

Speakers
avatar for Renate Samson

Renate Samson

Senior Policy Advisor, Open Data Institute


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Carthage 3 (Laico)

12:00pm

BLACKED OUT: A documentary about the longest internet shutdown ever recorded.."
1) I will be screening my documentary; a documentary that narrates the story of the longest over recorded internet black out that happened in Cameroon. It discusses the fundamental human rights abuse endured by the minority English-speaking people that make up the North and South West Regions of Cameroon. 2) Participants are expected to have a question and answer during this sitting soon after the documentary is screened.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Leptis (Laico)

12:00pm

Access No_! Voices from conflict zones
The Access No_! session will allow excluded digital and social activists from around the globe to tell RightsCon attendees in their own words why internet access matters in the midst of conflict. The panel will feature vlogs from individuals whose physical movement is restricted due to conflict or persecution by permits, bringing voices to the conference that would otherwise not be present. The panel will raise awareness of the importance of access to internet in conflict areas and engage session participants in a facilitated discussion on improving protections to safe and accessible internet for activists. The 60-minute panel will include three segments: 1- Internet Freedom Fighters: Where are they now? An update from the Syrian internet freedom fighters featured in the 2018 RightsCon. 2- Messages from activists with restricted movement: Profiles of activists in conflict areas who are unable to travel due to active conflict or persecution by permits (lack of status or documentation). 3- Discussion: The session participants will be engaged in discussion with a panel to address the most prevalent and emerging threats to safe internet access for individuals in conflict zones and the role of the broader internet freedom community to support these individuals.

Moderators
avatar for Deirdre Collings

Deirdre Collings

Executive Director, The SecDev Foundation
Deirdre Collings is the co-Founder and Executive Director of The SecDev Foundation, which works globally to promote digital opportunity, safety and citizenship in conflict and fragile contexts. She is a specialist in conflict and development, identity-based politics and digital change... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dima Samaro

Dima Samaro

Dima Samaro is a Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Policy Associate at Access Now. She works closely with the Policy team conducting policy analysis and promoting human rights activism on the internet in the MENA region. Before joining Access Now, Dima served as a legal researcher... Read More →
avatar for Nada al-Farhan

Nada al-Farhan

Field Team Manger, SalamaTech, The SecDev Foundation
Nada al-Farhan is the Field Team Manager at The SecDev Foundation's SalamaTech project, supporting digital safety efforts in Syria. Nada builds and empowers networks of non-profit beneficiaries, particularly supporting women, youth and civil society in the Middle East.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Celtic (Palais)

1:00pm

North Koreans Need Real Information
North Korea has one of the most heavily censored media environments in the world. Knowing the threat outside information poses to their propaganda and ideology, the North Korean government aggressively limits outside information from reaching the ears, eyes, and minds of their citizens.

This session will explore North Korean government censorship, how technology is being used to facilitate the flow of information into North Korea, and the complications facing human rights groups who are actively participating in data smuggling attempts. Multiple facilitators will speak on the work they are doing to address this issue.

First, PSCORE will present a video interview with a recent North Korean defector. This interviewee has a unique perspective to share, as he was one of the lucky few North Koreans able to access free information due to his high-ranking position that mandated work outside North Korea. He will discuss how access to this information helped facilitate his emancipation from North Korea.

Second, Unification Media Group will discuss the diverse work its media activists, many of whom have escaped from North Korea, do to amplify the free flow of information into, out of, and within the country. UMG will also share details from a recent survey it conducted with over 200 North Korean refugees concerning access to information in North Korea and leveraging the country's shifting media landscape in order to erode the regime's information blockade.

Next, Transitional Justice Working Group (TJWG) will discuss their documentation project that maps the sites of gross human rights violations in North Korea, how the transitional justice approach can guide decision-makers, and the need for that approach to be victim-centered.


Lastly, there will be an open panel discussion/ feedback session where participants have the opportunity to discuss and brainstorm ideas and strategies to address the lack of access to free information in North Korea. We hope this presentation serves as a first step in establishing a working group to develop new strategies to connect the North Korean people to the rest of the world.

Moderators
Speakers
DB

Dan Bielefeld

Transitional Justice Working Group
avatar for Bada Nam

Bada Nam

Secretary General, PSCORE (People for Successful COrean REunification)
Human Rights defender, Korea focused


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Village Stage (Laico)

1:00pm

The Benevolent Accomplices of Authoritarian Regimes on the Internet
The Internet helped communities facing oppression to publish and get organized more freely, with unprecedented global reach. Censorship was not eradicated on the Internet but nation-states were not fully successful in controlling access to and distribution of online content till now. With the widespread of online social media platforms where in many countries it is equivalent to many to the Internet, the Internet’s global reach was taken to its next level. Platforms did not remain neutral. In the name of preventing harm or under pressure, fighting with disinformation, terrorism and preserving cybersecurity, platforms have been taking content down. There are many other benevolent actors and activists that are marching towards censorship online in the name of fighting with fake news, protecting children and preventing intellectual property violations. Increasingly states, platforms, political parties and activists have been demonstrating similar behavior to that of authoritarian regimes. We would like to discuss how democratic countries, Internet intermediaries and other benevolent actors can be de facto helping autocratic countries to hamper speech and activism. The goal of the session is to provide some insight into the consequences of online content takedown and access blockage for the societies that live in oppression like in MENA.

Moderators
avatar for Rafik Dammak

Rafik Dammak

Non-commercial Stakeholder Group former Chair
He is engineer working and living in Japan. He is member of the steering committee for the Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles . He has been involved in ICANN community as NCUC (Non-commercial users constituency) individual user member, former elected GNSO Councillor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Emna Mizouni

Emna Mizouni

Emna, a Tunisian-Maghrebi, is a Digital Communications Specialist and the Lead of Digital Citizenship Organization. She is the President-Founder of Carthagina organisation, trying to promote Tunisia globally through digitising heritage. She is an advocate for Open Culture and Open... Read More →
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Milton Mueller is the O.G. of I.G. He directs the Internet Governance Project, a center for research and engagement on global Internet governance. Mueller's books Will the Internet Fragment? (Polity, 2017), Networks and States: The global politics of Internet governance (MIT Press... Read More →
avatar for Omer Fisher

Omer Fisher

Head, Human Rights Department, OSCE/ODIHR
I lead the OSCE/ODIHR Human Rights Department and have a strong interest in technology and human rights. In particular, I am interested in freedom of peaceful assembly, freedom of expression, technology for human rights monitoring, games as awareness raising / learning tools. I am... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Carthage 1 (Laico)

1:00pm

AI for Justice: Opportunities and limitations to analyzing today's human rights data troves
The session will feature an engaging discussion with experts and the audience regarding the evolving challenge of how to document and promote accountability for violations of international law in the world of Facebook and YouTube. Still equipped with primarily traditional tools, international justice institutions have had difficulty navigating the digital deluge of data to take advantage of social media's offer of wider access to truth. In Syria, the efforts of civil society, journalists, and human rights defenders have resulted in what is today the most documented conflict in history. But with millions of videos in their collection, it may take investigators years or decades to comb through and identify key evidence. This is where new technologies can help. By strategically applying artificial intelligence, computer vision, and metadata analysis methods to sort, identify, preserve, and analyze documentation of abuses and potential war crimes, investigators can be empowered to effectively convert their data troves into actionable evidence, which will be essential to promoting justice for victims. This session will explore such possibilities, as well as the challenges and ethical concerns inherent in leveraging AI, regardless of the good intentions behind its application.

Moderators
SM

Shabnam Mojtahedi

Benetech
I am a lawyer focused on rule of law and human rights in the MENA region. At Benetech, I am leading efforts to apply artificial intelligence to help civil society organizations pursue justice and accountability in Syria and beyond.

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Cyrene (Laico)

1:00pm

Equality Labs Press Conference for the release of "Facebook India: Towards the Tipping Point of Violence. Casteist and Religious Hate Speech on the platform."
This press conference will cover the highlights of Equality Labs' new report Facebook India: Towards the Tipping Point of Violence. The report features data and analysis from a four-month research project monitoring caste, religious, and gendered hate speech in Facebook India. One of the critical findings of this report is that Facebook India has failed to provide a safe platform for caste, religious, and gender minorities and the press, with a disturbing volume of hate speech, disinformation, and calls to violence against them allowed to remain on the platform. The press conference will break down some of the report's findings as well as provide an opportunity for journalists to ask questions for more insight into the challenges of Facebook's largest market.

Speakers
avatar for Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi is an artist, activist, and technologist with Equality Labs., Equality Labs
Equality Labs


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Utique (Laico)

1:00pm

Wide Whistleblowing: 9 NGOs, 10 countries, and 250 anonymous digital dropboxes
Wide Whistleblowing: 9 NGOs, 10 countries & 250 anonymous digital dropboxes (Blueprint for Free Speech)

Speakers: Suelette Dreyfus  

Speakers
avatar for Suelette	Dreyfus

Suelette Dreyfus

Executive Director, Blueprint for Free Speech
I circle the protections around the journalist-source relationship via technology, law, policy, education, practice and research. My other hat is as an Academic Specialist in the School of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Oya 3 (Laico)

1:00pm

False Resistance Leaders: The People Who Decry Trump While Promoting Authoritarianism
U.S. politics is easily viewed as left vs. right, Democrat vs. Republican, and today, Trump vs. everyone else. But the politics of authoritarianism and surveillance are not so simply aligned. Not only are some of the strongest surveillance reformers Republicans, some of the strongest supporters of mass surveillance are also #Resistance champions. In advance of the 2020 election, when some of these people may seek higher office, it is imperative for the human rights community to identify who our real allies are, and who may be the fire to Trump’s pan. This panel will work to identify actors on both sides of that equation and discuss possible responses.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
L'Escale (Laico)

1:00pm

Social Media and Conflict: Research and product case studies
Understanding the use and abuse of social media is an urgent issue for rights-based organizations and social media platforms, especially in conflict vulnerable countries with transitioning politics and high-stakes elections. What lessons have researchers and tech leaders drawn from working at the intersection of these issues? What investments could improve the response to harms on social media? This discussion will examine these questions and offer suggestions, drawing on insights from researchers from South Asia, Francophone Africa and a Director of Product from Facebook. 


Moderators
avatar for Javier Pallero

Javier Pallero

Latam Lead, Access Now
Latin America Regional Lead at Access Now. I also coordinate Access Now's work on content moderation and related freedom of expression issues.I also work on: - Net Neutrality ( including zero rating, OTT regulation)- Privacy (surveillance, data protection)- Business and Human Rights... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Caspian (Palais)

1:00pm

Digital Rights Monopoly
The Digital Rights Monopoly session is an innovative approach towards raising awareness among the session participants about some of the digital rights issues which are faced by youth from various underrepresented regions globally. One of the greatest challenges towards solving digital and human rights issues online is that most users are often unaware of the importance of digital rights and its role in the sustainability of a healthy internet. In our version of the monopoly game, we aim to highlight some of these issues and offer a fun method for internet users to learn about them.

Moderators
avatar for Uffa Modey

Uffa Modey

Co Founder, Digital Grassroots

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Hannibal (Laico)

1:00pm

Freedom of expression for LGBT, HIV, and gender equality activists in Ukraine
During the session will be presented the survey and analytical report 'Freedom of expression online for LGBT, HIV and gender equality activists' prepared by NGO Fulcrum UA in September 2018 under suppport of Counterpart International (200 respondents, distribution by gender: women, men, non-binary people, distribution by sphere of activism: LGBT, HIV, gender equality). Also, audience will be involved in discussion about various forms of cyberbullying against activists (insults, threats, intimidaton, blocking online activity etc.), ways to deal with them, what institutions to report cases of cyberbullying and other human rights violations online, methods to prevent cyberbullying (through educational activities etc), as well as Internet security, safe and responsible online behaviour for activists. This session is for: LGBT+, HIV, gender equality activists, human rights activists in general, lawyers, administrators of online platforms, online rights researchers, representatives of NGOs and international organizations, policy makers

Moderators
avatar for Yana Tovpeko

Yana Tovpeko

Communications manager, NGO Fulcrum UA
Yana is an human rights activist from Ukraine, currently working as a communications manager at NGO Fulcrum UA. Yana defended the first PhD thesis in Ukraine raising the issue of discrimination against LGBT people in the legal context (2017). Former Human Rights Education intern at... Read More →

Speakers
TL

Tymur Levchuk

Founder, CEO, NGO Fulcurm UA
HR, LGBT+, SDGs expert.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Oya 2 (Laico)

1:00pm

Lightning Talks: Questioning access and accountability
How to effectively use the experience and expertise of former extremists and academics to disrupt terrorist recruitment (CENTRI)

With academic knowledge, tech, and media at our disposal how can we best architect a viable alternative to extremist narratives? Terrorists' recruitment tactics follow a simple pattern whether that be white supremacism or Islamist terror. They distort, play on fear, and encourage hatred of the other. Drawing on knowledge of formers and academics together with the help of tech and media organisations, it is possible to organise grassroots activities that will be an effective antidote to extremist narratives.

The Groundswell Project has been devised to do exactly that using Hadiya Masieh’s 22 years of experience and insight. She was part of a radical Islamist group for 10 years and has spent over a decade pulling young women out of and away from Al Qaidah/Daesh. The key has been to bring around the table media, tech, academics and activist and devising similar tactics extremist use to spread their rhetoric. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel, everything we need to challenge this at its roots is right in-front of us. It’s necessary however to be practical, passionate, creative, and to join forces with others to effectively push back against extremism and create an environment that does not provide fertile ground for extremists to grow in numbers and recruit new people to aid their cause. Her talk will be on how to practically do this.

Speaker: Hadiya Masieh


Barricades to Justice (Media Matters for Democracy)

Description: The session introduces a legal aid program our organization has initiated in Pakistan that aims to provide journalists and activists with free legal assistance. It will start by highlighting the need for this program, in which we plan to explain the attacks on media persons for voicing their dissent in the country. Followed by this, the speaker will give a very brief overview of the cases that have been or decided by the Courts relating to freedom of expression, and how these cases have impacted the rights of people. A few major cases in this regards pertain to network shutdowns and connectivity. The session will then highlight the challenges faced by lawyers and media persons when approaching the courts to guarantee freedom of digital expression. By engaging in a discussion on this, the ultimate goal of the session would then be to collect feedback from the legal experts and activists from other countries/ communities, on legal methods that have to be adopted and how to combat the challenges, by using the law, and how to better protect the right to free speech in an online space.

Speaker: Salwa Sameer Rana

Intellectual Property and Sacred Reciprocity at the Frontiers of Psychedelic Medicine (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies - MAPS)

Description: If a hot Silicon Valley startup develops a new mental health treatment by applying machine learning to a publicly available scientific database, what legal or ethical obligations does it have to the indigenous ayahuasca shamans whose plant medicine expertise made that database possible? This scenario may seem fanciful, but it raises important questions that affect real people. The “Psychedelic Renaissance” is here, and questions like this – about ownership, access, and practicality – remain. Existing international frameworks for protecting indigenous genetic resources and traditional knowledge were created at a time when drug development often required transferring physical samples across borders. The international community is still grappling with whether and how such frameworks apply to synthetic biology, just as artificial intelligence is poised to exponentially accelerate the pace of drug development. The session will open with a short, high level overview of relevant international frameworks (including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Nagoya Protocol, and ongoing negotiations at the World Intellectual Property Organization). Then we will shift to an interactive discussion that will explore the ethics of legalizing and commercializing psychedelic plant medicines – like psilocybin, ayahuasca, and even cannabis – and principles for equitably sharing the benefits of indigenous knowledge.

Speaker: Ismail Ali

Breaking Down the Prison Walls: Digital Community Platforms for Access to Justice (International Bridges to Justice)

Description: 3 million people around the world languish in pre-trial detention without access to a lawyer and at risk of torture. Can the global movement for access to justice harness technology to connect legal defenders and put a stop to these human rights abuses? Karen Tse’s lightning talk will tackle this question by highlighting the power of digital community platforms to create sustainable and long-lasting impact on a broad scale. She will share IBJ's journey towards the creation of IBJ’s JusticeHub (a digital platform for accessing justice), discuss its core functionalities and spark a conversation on the impact of digital community platforms on the work of lawyers and human rights advocates across thematic spheres. IBJ’s JusticeHub will serve as a “work forum” and “strategic convener” to connect the global legal defender community. This community currently lacks a participatory online space. IBJ believes technology can overcome this coordination problem. Join Karen to hear how NGOs can bring technology and justice together to move towards a world free from torture and other abuses.

Speaker: Karen Tse

Speakers
avatar for Hadiya Masieh

Hadiya Masieh

Founder and CEO, Groundswell Project
Hadiya Masieh is an expert consultant in the area of community cohesion, interfaith relations, counter extremism, and women’s involvement in extremism and radicalisation. Her experience spans over 22 years. She has been a counter extremism consultant for various Governments and... Read More →
avatar for Karen Tse

Karen Tse

Founder & CEO, International Bridges to Justice
Karen founded International Bridges to Justice in 2000 to promote systemic global change in the administration of criminal justice. A former public defender, Karen first developed her interest in the cross section of criminal law and human rights as a Thomas J. Watson Fellow in 1986... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

1:00pm

Help We Are Under Attack! A peek into the community of rapid responders
This interactive session is facilitated by a group of Rapid Responders that provide time critical support to at-risk organizations and individuals. Our organizations take a holistic approach to digital security. In order to effectively respond to Internet emergencies, all responses must encompass physical, legal, infrastructural, and emotional safety. Representatives from Access Now, the Digital Defenders Partnership, Front Line Defenders, Media Legal Defence Initiative and Greenhost will participate. There will be a short introduction, of the organizations, and in which we discuss briefly about the different ways of providing emergency support. Each organization will be seated in one section of the room, and attendees will have a chance to join the group of one organization. They will have a chance to ask questions about the organization and its work, as well as discuss in small groups. The first rotation will last 8 minutes. After rotation one, attendees will be able to move to the next table that interests them. There will be six rotations, so enough for all individuals to visit all the tables. At the end of the rotations, we will all join together again and have a short discussion, based on feedback from participants.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Meerim Ilyas

Meerim Ilyas

Deputy Head of Protection, Front Line Defenders
Protection for HRDs, gendered aspects of holistic security, LGBTI, feminist internet, intersectionality
avatar for Hapee de Groot

Hapee de Groot

Rapid Response, Greenhost
open source, rapid response, websites under attack, development of people and software, ict4d, drupal, linux, ubuntu, geek, opendata, security & greenhost


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Carthage 2 (Laico)

1:00pm

Pegasus Spyware Threatens Press Freedom, From Mexico to Saudi Arabia
This session will highlight the threat that the spyware Pegasus poses to journalists, their sources, families, and associates, by putting the researcher documenting its use around the world in dialogue. It will also feature a forward-looking conversation about the parallel efforts—export controls, lawsuits, advocacy campaigns—pushing to limit Pegasus's harm.

Moderators
avatar for Avi Asher-Schapiro

Avi Asher-Schapiro

North America Researcher & Technology Reporter, Committee to Protect Journalists

Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate... Read More →
avatar for Raphael Satter

Raphael Satter

Cybersecurity Writer, Associated Press
avatar for Danya Centeno

Danya Centeno

Lawyer, R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales
I am a Mexican lawyer with an LL.M on International Human Rights and Criminal Justice from Utrecht University. Working with R3D I am mostly passionate about issues related to surveillance, content moderation, misinformation and gender violence online. Previously I worked with the... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Biscay (Palais)

1:00pm

Tech Demos: AI for Maps and Chats
Build contextual chatbots and Artificial Intelligence assistants with open source conversational AI framework / Développez des chatbots contextuels et des assistants basé sur l'intelligence artificielle avec un framework IA open source (RASA NLU) (Wevioo)

Speakers: Khaled Ben Driss

In this tech demo, we will present how to develop a chatbot from scratch using an NLP open source framework (RASA NLU). The Rasa NLU framework is a set of open source machine learning tools for developers to create contextual chatbots and assistants. What is a ChatBot? What can you do with a Chatbot? Presentation of Natural Language Processing Solutions (NLP / NLU), Discovery of RASA an open source framework AI for NLP / NLU, Handle contextual conversations with deep learning instead of hand-crafted rules, The heart of Chatbot, Preparations & Configurations, Connecting to an external API, Integrating ChatBot with your information system, Integrating ChatBot with social networks, Improvements to Chatbot based on usage.

Le but de la session est de montrer les étapes nécessaires à la création d'un chatbot conversationnel basé sur la structure open source RASA: Qu'est-ce qu'un ChatBot? Que pouvez-vous faire avec un chatbot? Présentation des solutions de traitement du langage naturel (NLP / NLU) Découverte de RASA, une AI framework open source Le coeur du Chatbot Préparations et configurations Gérez les conversations contextuelles avec un apprentissage en profondeur plutôt que des règles élaborées à la main Connexion à une API externe Intégrer ChatBot à votre système d'information Intégration de ChatBot avec les réseaux sociaux Améliorations de Chatbot en fonction de l'utilisation

Note: This Tech Demo will be presented in French.

Super-vision: AI and satellite data for human rights (Element AI)

This is a demonstration of using machine learning techniques to identify structures in satellite data at scale and state of the art techniques for enhancing the resolution of low resolution satellite imagery.

Speaker: Julien Cornebise 

Speakers
avatar for Khaled Ben Driss

Khaled Ben Driss

Owner - CTO, Wevioo
Khaled BEN DRISS is a graduate of the Ecole Centrale de Lyon and Doctor of the University Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie), he taught at the University of Tunis and the Polytechnic of Tunisia as Maitre-Assistant 1995 to 1999. Between 1999-2002 he worked as Vice President of R & D... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Elydhafa (Laico)

2:15pm

Authoritarianism killed radio stars
The main objective of this session is to identify the benefits and the best ways to use traditional communication formats such as radio, print and television but in the digital field to combat censorship, authoritarianism and the communicational hegemony of the States based on the Venezuelan experience.

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Biscay (Palais)

2:15pm

Future Proof: Imagining a tech positive future
Come help us envision a tech positive future and plot the steps necessary to get us there. Our community is fighting against repression on so many fronts, it's hard to keep up. I worry that too many people around the world are surrendering to the idea that technology can only create and empower evil. I want to take some time to step back together with the leaders in the global community that attend Rightscon, to work toward an overarching story that we can tell the rest of the world and that helps builds us toward an empowered, tech positive future. My hope is that we can identify themes and stories that we can all use to help us convince the rest of the world that technology can be used to build a better world.

Speakers
avatar for Cindy Cohn

Cindy Cohn

Executive Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
avatar for Lucas Pretti

Lucas Pretti

Global Product Director, Change.org Foundation


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Hannibal (Laico)

2:15pm

Ending Impunity for Online Violence Against Women in Politics
The United States Department of State’s Office of Global Women’s Affairs affirms that “[o]ffline and online violence is a barrier to women and girls’ access to ICTs and the internet, and their broader human rights, stifling freedoms of expression, association and assembly.” Online violence against women in politics is an especially damaging violation of internet freedom, because it is intended to silence women’s voices and prevent them from exercising their civic and political rights. This session discussion brings together some of the leading activists and researchers in this field to discuss how online violence against women in politics threatens internet freedom and how digital advocacy, legal responses and awareness campaigns worldwide are engaging to protect the internet freedom of women who exercise their civil and political rights. Speakers will share their ongoing work with digital activists, women’s community organizations and law enforcement in dozens of low- and middle-income countries worldwide to address this issue, as well as their research and work with national and international policy development.

Moderators
avatar for Gina Chirillo

Gina Chirillo

Gender Program Officer, International Foundation for Electoral Systems
Gina Chirillo is the Gender Program Officer at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES), where she provides technical assistance to IFES' work empowering women in politics and promoting inclusive elections. Chirillo joined IFES as a Research Officer in the Center... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Avery Davis-Roberts

Avery Davis-Roberts

Associate Director, Democracy Program, The Carter Center


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Elydhafa (Laico)

2:15pm

Are we seriously going to trade away our privacy like cars, rice, or bananas?
When data becomes a trade commodity, privacy is treated as a trade barrier. Policymakers are using this logic, and therefore privacy and data protection rules are undermined by binding, enforceable trade agreements. Trade deals containing data governance rules are crafted by technology companies who are the only stakeholders represented in the negotiations. Appearing first in the Trans- Pacific Partnership (TPP), these rules constrain how countries regulate the cross- border transfer of data. Since the TPP, these rules have emerged in a growing number of bilateral, plurilateral, and regional trade agreements. This is despite the fact that such provisions directly undermine nations' human rights obligations. Furthermore, these rules could worsen competition between platform companies as they grow to become international data monopolies. This session will collectively map and strategize a way forward to influence trade policy making on behalf of digital rights organizations and all those who defend our human rights on the internet. The highlight will be a facilitated discussion about what each person can do to get involved to defend privacy and fight for a more diverse internet economy worldwide.

Moderators
avatar for Francisco Vera

Francisco Vera

Advocacy officer, Privacy International

Speakers
avatar for J. Carlos Lara

J. Carlos Lara

Director - Public Policy, Derechos Digitales
Internet lover, coffee lover, live music lover, bacon lover, dog lover, cat lover, internet hater.
avatar for Burcu Kilic

Burcu Kilic

Director, Digital Rights Program, Public Citizen


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Carthage 3 (Laico)

2:15pm

Data Trust Models in the Digital Era: A public, private and people matter
This session will bring together panelists from different background to discuss the data stewardship models that we are beginning to see develop around the world. Sensors and the Internet of Things are amassing data about citizens, their whereabouts and behaviour in the name of making the functionality of these spaces more efficient and benefit the public good. Due largely to uncharted relationship between governments and the private sector as it relates to data collection, use and control of data, policymakers have been grappling with creating and adopting data stewardship models to allow for innovation while addressing public concerns. “Data Trusts” have become the catchphrase for some of these stewardship mechanisms that can be administered by the government, private sector, the public or a combination of different actors. They may be industry specific or broad enough to include various kinds of data. What are the various data trust models? What can we learn about the benefits/challenges that exist in creating each of these mechanisms? The discussion will elicit thought provoking issues related to how data can be collected, used, controlled – and in some cases even monetized. It will also explore the relationship between government, private sector, users and data subjects.

Moderators
avatar for Rohinton Medhora

Rohinton Medhora

President, Centre for International Governance Innovation
Rohinton P. Medhora is president of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), joining in 2012. He served on CIGI's former International Board of Governors from 2009 to 2014. Previously, he was vice president of programs at Canada’s International Development Research... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sean McDonald

Sean McDonald

Co-Founder, Digital Public
Sean McDonald is a co-founder of Digital Public, a public interest data governance firm. Digital Public pioneered Civic Data Trusts – legal frameworks that enable groups to build fiduciary, purpose-driven management of the rights to data, code, and other digital assets. He's also... Read More →
avatar for Sylvie Delacroix

Sylvie Delacroix

Professor in Law and Ethics, U. of Birmingham and Alan Turing Institute
Challenging the ‘one size fits all’, feudal approach to data gov.: bottom up data trusts can not only empower us to choose among different approaches to data gov., switch trust when needed. can also facilitate access to pre-authorised, disparate datasets: https://papers.ssrn... Read More →
avatar for Philip Dawson

Philip Dawson

Lead, Public Policy, Element AI
Philip Dawson is Public Policy Lead at Element AI, where he works with governments and partner organizations to develop policies for artificial intelligence that empower the public and foster responsible economic growth. Reach out to discuss collaboration around privacy, data protection... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Celtic (Palais)

2:15pm

20 Years Since the Human Rights Defenders Declaration was Adopted at the UN, Over 150 HRDs Got Together in Paris to Celebrate Achievements, Discuss Current Challenges and Devise an Action Plan
Twenty years since the adoption of the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, human rights defenders continue to be attacked, discriminated, criminalized, and killed at alarming levels. There is still much to work do to fully realize the commitment made by States to ensure everyone is fully able to defend human rights.

To confront this situation, in October 2018, 150 activists from all corners of the world met in Paris at the Human Rights Defenders World Summit to remind the world of the essential work they do and the need to create a safe and enabling environment for all those who actively defend human rights. At the end of the Summit, all defenders agreed on a landmark Action Plan, which was presented to the UN General Assembly in December 2018.

The Action Plan calls on Governments, corporations, international financial institutions, donors and others to take practical steps to ensure human rights defenders are recognised and protected, including by adopting national governmental action plans and legislation, and protecting defenders as a key priority in foreign policy, particularly women human rights defenders, LGBT+, indigenous rights defenders and other marginalized defenders who face the most risk and exclusion.
As participants to the Paris Summit continue to spread this message around the world, Rightscon is a key opportunity to keep the momentum going. We want the tech community to join us in our fight for human rights and demand that defenders are protected and recognised everywhere without discrimination.

The digital space has been identified by participants in the Paris Summit as another battleground in which human rights are being fought. This space has enabled defenders to reach new audiences and enable communication and advocacy, but it has also presented new means and opportunities for those who attack human rights defenders, with new weapons being used every day from malware and spyware, to the use of social media to manipulate information. The means may be new but the effects on defenders are as old as the world: delegitimization, discrimination, threats, criminalization, physical attacks, and impunity.

A delegation of human rights defenders will present their experience of taking action to defend human rights, the consequences they’ve had to face, the significance of the Summit and what states, businesses, donors and others, must do to ensure their fundamental role is protected and recognised in the digital sphere and beyond, and calling on the Tech community to join them in the struggle for human rights. The panel will welcome contributions and ideas from the floor.


Moderators
avatar for Lisa Maracani

Lisa Maracani

Research and policy advisor, Human rights defenders, Amnesty International
Human rights defenders are my bag!Have worked also at: Peace Brigades International, Christian Aid, Amnesty Italy.My last project: Targeting Solidarity: Criminalization and harassment of people defending refugee and migrant rights in Northern France, https://www.amnesty.org/en/la... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Khalid Ibrahim

Khalid Ibrahim

Executive Director, Gulf Centre for Human Rights
A certified specialist in the field of human rights with an interest in the use of new technologies to enhance the protection of human rights defenders including online activists in the MENA region.
avatar for Meerim Ilyas

Meerim Ilyas

Deputy Head of Protection, Front Line Defenders
Protection for HRDs, gendered aspects of holistic security, LGBTI, feminist internet, intersectionality


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Cyrene (Laico)

2:15pm

Fighting for Human Rights and Democracy in the Digital World: New tools, new actors – How to be more efficient?
Traditional way of fighting for human rights and protecting democracy are not sufficient to protect these values in the digital world: regulations from countries or international organizations are weak or non-existent; private interest are very present or even dominating; communication methods are in constant evolution and still too easy to manipulate. What are the most efficient levers today to protect Human rights and Democracy in the cyber space? There is an emergency to have concrete actions with high impact, and various initiatives have been launched. How can they unite their action to be more effective? What recommendations and expectations would the different stakeholders have from one another?

This session will start by a short introduction by each speakers on their actions and their main stakes. There will then be a dialogue with speakers to understand what they should expect from each other and identify mutual actions to reinforce global action. The discussion will then open up to all participants. In a fishbowl format, anyone can enter the circle and contribute to the discussion through comments or questions to the speakers.

Les outils et leviers législatifs utilisés par les acteurs de la protection des droits de l’Homme et de la démocratie ne sont pas suffisant pour défendre ces valeurs dans le monde numérique: la régulation des Etats comme des organisations internationales y est faible voire inexistante, les intérêts privés très présents voire dominants, les modalités de communication en évolution constante et encore aujourd’hui trop manipulables. Quels sont les leviers les plus efficaces à mobiliser aujourd’hui pour protéger les droits de l’Homme et la démocratie dans l’espace cyber? L’urgence est de disposer d’actions concrètes à fort impact, divers initiatives ont été lancées, comment peuvent-elles unir leur action pour être plus efficace? Quelles seraient les recommandations que chacun de ces acteurs auraient pour l’autre ?

Cette session débutera par une brève introduction de la part de chaque intervenant sur ses actions et ses principaux enjeux. Il y aura un dialogue avec les intervenants pour comprendre ce qu'ils attendent les uns des autres et identifier des actions mutuelles pour renforcer l'action mondiale. La discussion s'ouvrira ensuite à tous les participants. Dans un format fish bowl, tous les participants ont la possibilité d’entrer dans le cercle et contribuer à la discussion en faisant des commentaires ou en posant des questions aux intervenants.

Moderators
avatar for Amélie Banzet

Amélie Banzet

Head of open government, Etalab
Amélie Banzet is in charge of Open Government for Etalab and is the French State point of contact for the Open Government Partnership.Etalab is part of the French Direction for State Digital, Information system and communication, within the Prime minister office, where it carries... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Deirdre Collings

Deirdre Collings

Executive Director, The SecDev Foundation
Deirdre Collings is the co-Founder and Executive Director of The SecDev Foundation, which works globally to promote digital opportunity, safety and citizenship in conflict and fragile contexts. She is a specialist in conflict and development, identity-based politics and digital change... Read More →
avatar for Elodie Vialle

Elodie Vialle

Head of Journalism and Technology desk, Reporters without Borders
Identifying new threats that undermine the freedom of information l Knight-Wallace Fellow’20. Working on countering online attacks against female journalists.
avatar for Rauno Merisaari

Rauno Merisaari

Ambassador for Human Rights and Democracy, Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland
Ambassador at-large on Human Rights and Democracy Mr. Rauno Merisaari (b. 1957) is a Finnish diplomat and has a long career in the human rights policy and foreign relations both in the government and in civil society. He is a leading expert in the international human rights policy... Read More →
avatar for Fanny Hidvégi

Fanny Hidvégi

European Policy Manager, Access Now
Fanny (@infofannny) is Access Now’s European Policy Manager based in Brussels. Previously, Fanny was International Privacy Fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. where she focused on E.U.-U.S. data transfers. For three years Fanny led the Freedom... Read More →
avatar for Peggy Hicks

Peggy Hicks

Director. Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
Since January 2016, Peggy Hicks has served as director of the Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division at the UN's human rights office. From 2005 to 2015, she was global advocacy director at Human Rights Watch, where she was responsible for coordinating... Read More →
avatar for Henri Verdier

Henri Verdier

Ambassador for Digital Affairs, France
Henri Verdier was born in 1968. Currently, he is Ambassador for Digital Affairs for the French Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs. Previously, he was the interministerial director for digital information and communications systems (DG Dinsic) of France; and director of Etalab... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Village Stage (Laico)

2:15pm

2:15pm

A Friend in Need Is a Friend Indeed: Building on the first public statements by business and civil society on business protection of civic freedoms
In 2018, both important progressive businesses and the World Summit on human rights defenders have publicly recognized for the first time, through two separate statements, that civic freedoms, defenders and respect for the rule of law are vitally important for both civil society and business - and that businesses have a role to play in protecting defenders and civic freedoms. Yet, the “two sides” have not discussed these commitments face to face yet. This session will be a chance for the representatives of these two communities to come together, to talk frankly about the expectations that they have for one another, through a “fire-side chat”. They will discuss: “What are the realistic expectations with regard to business protection of civic freedoms and defenders? What are the main principles that both sides can agree upon that would lead to cooperation? What are the main obstacles? What is the role of governments? Can there be a joint stance by businesses and civil society?” The goal of the session will be for the two sets of actors to walk away with strengthened trust and a clearer understanding of each other’s positions - and to share those with their communities.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Michael Karimian

Michael Karimian

Senior Manager, Human Rights, Microsoft
avatar for Michael Ineichen

Michael Ineichen

Programme Director, International Service for Human Rights
Michael joined ISHR in 2006 and has contributed to many of ISHR's core activities and programs and currently coordinates the work on business and human rights defenders. He oversees advocacy at the Human Rights Council, and has contributed to many key resolutions, most recently on... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Jelsa (Laico)

2:15pm

Organizing a Global South Led Movement for Platform Accountabilty with the Next Billion Coalition
Enough is enough. Even though countries from the global south represent over 70% of the markets for social media platforms our issues are rarely at the table for silicon valley based companies. This is one of the reasons we formed Next Billion coalitios. We wanted frontline grassroots organizations to not only be at the table at critical platform conversation but we want our needs to be driving change when it comes to online safety, disinformation, and privacy. We also want to discuss the issues of election integrity as many of our countries were also impacted by the platforms activities in our elections. We currently have members from Myanmar, Mexico, Vietnam, India, Brazil, Syria, Palestine, Malaysia, and Philipines. While we are just getting started we want to use this session to share our vision for platform accountability as well as be a venue for other organizations interested in coming on board. We will also be sharing the finding of our latest research project which will feature comparisons of hate speech moderation on Facebook across 10 different countries.

Moderators
avatar for Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi is an artist, activist, and technologist with Equality Labs., Equality Labs
Equality Labs

Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
L'Escale (Laico)

2:15pm

Busting Out of the Echo Chamber: an inclusive approach to build diverse online communities and generate constructive conversations between polarized youth
In this interactive session we will gather input on how to create more and better civic spaces. We will discuss our inclusive approach for online community building in restrictive settings, including the challenges of putting this approach into practice. We will gather suggestions to improve our approach and supporting strategies. We will focus on lessons learned and best practices for creating: • Inclusive Teams: Using examples from the Libya and DRC, we will discuss the challenges of building diverse and inclusive teams. • Inclusive Content and Communities: Using examples from DRC, Burundi and Libya, we will describe our media and engagement strategies to create safe spaces where young people from different backgrounds can come together in ways often impossible in the offline space. • Inclusive Partnerships: How to engage the broadest spectrum of stakeholders? Different organisations will discuss how they use a multi-stakeholder approach to be more inclusive. • Inclusive Tech: Faster, cheaper internet is one way to make platforms more inclusive but often beyond our control. We will discuss how we optimise our platforms to make them more accessible and invite others to discuss their solutions to this issue.

Moderators
avatar for Nigel Pedlingham

Nigel Pedlingham

Programme Manager Citizens' Voice, RNW Media
Nigel is Programme Manager of Citizens' Voice at the Netherlands based INGO RNW Media.RNW Media uses media for change. With innovative approaches to building digital media platforms and large scale inclusive digital communities RNW Media enables young people to make informed choices... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael J. Oghia

Michael J. Oghia

Advocacy & Engagement Manager, Global Forum for Media Development
Check out our newly launched Dynamic Coalition on the Sustainability of Journalism and News Media (DC-Sustainability): https://bit.ly/2oukRSf
avatar for Michele Ernsting

Michele Ernsting

Director Programme Dev., RNW Media
Digital communities, alternative civic space, youth inclusion, love, sex & relationships, data for advocacy and honey bees.
avatar for Pavithra Ram

Pavithra Ram

Content Strategist, RNW Media
Pavi is an international development specialist focused on the intersection of internet, media and social change. Currently a strategist in RNW Media’s social inclusion program- Citizens’ Voice, she helps build digital communities and create alternate/digital civic spaces in countries... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Carthage 2 (Laico)

2:15pm

2:15pm

Internet Regulation - The Good, the Bad, the Ugly: A model for regulatory effectiveness
This session will address the growing, global appetite for Internet regulation, and will set out a model for consideration by policy stakeholders which maps to the Internet stack. Indicators for the effectiveness of Internet regulation will be discussed, and the impact of regulations having extra-territorial reach will be examined using key case studies. Active debate throughout the session will be encouraged by the co-moderators.

Moderators
SS

Sally Shipman Wentworth

Vice President, Global Policy Development, Internet Society

Speakers
avatar for Fahd Batayneh

Fahd Batayneh

Stakeholder Engagement Senior Manager, Middle East, ICANN
Fahd joined ICANN in October 2013. Prior to ICANN, he held several positions within Jordan's National IT Center (NITC) last of which was managing both the ccTLD and IDN ccTLD of Jordan. Fahd has attended ICANN meetings on regular basis since 2008, and was active in several working... Read More →
avatar for Sandro Gianella

Sandro Gianella

Public Policy EMEA, Stripe


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Oya 1 (Laico)

2:15pm

Outcomes of the 3rd Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network and Presentation of the Internet & Jurisdiction Global Status Report
The Secretariat of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network will inform the participants of RightsCon Tunis about the outcomes of the 3rd Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network and the concrete proposals for policy standards and operational solutions that were developed by multistakeholder Contact Groups in each of the three Programs of the organization (Data & Jurisdiction, Content & Jurisdiction and Domains & Jurisdiction). The Secretariat will also present the world’s first Internet & Jurisdiction Global Status Report, which was launched at the 3rd Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. The Report enables evidence-based policy innovation and provides all stakeholders with the necessary information to develop frameworks and policy standards for the digital society and economy. It gives a comprehensive and regionally balanced overview and documentation of past, current and emerging trends, relevant actors and proposed solutions to the major cross-border legal policy challenges facing our connected society.

Moderators
avatar for Bertrand de La Chapelle

Bertrand de La Chapelle

Executive Director, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network
Director and Co-Founder of the Internet & Jurisdiction policy network.

Speakers
SB

Sharon Bradford Franklin

Director of Surveillance & Cybersecurity Policy, New America's Open Technology Institute
avatar for Peter Stern

Peter Stern

Policy Manager for Stakeholder Engagement, Facebook
Peter Stern is a Manager in the Product Policy group at Facebook in Menlo Park, California. Product Policy is responsible for writing and interpreting global policies governing what users can share on Facebook, and how advertisers and developers interact with the site. Peter leads... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Adean (Palais)

2:15pm

Strategically Litigating Internet Shutdowns and Cybercrime Laws in Africa: Reflecting on steps taken and the road ahead
This panel will address the severe increase in measures taken by states to restrict internet access and curtail online expression, and how civil society are counteracting these trends. The session will focus on the litigation of internet shutdowns and cybercrime laws. It aim is to foster collaborations for strategic litigation against these digital rights violations.

Instances where states have shut down or partially restricted internet access have continued to proliferate. Cybercrime laws have also come into force in numerous jurisdictions, many of which contain broad provisions that stifle protected expression and journalistic practice. The dual challenge these pose for internet access and online expression are at the forefront digital rights struggles on the continent.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Jaffee Moss

Michael Jaffee Moss

Media Legal Defence Initiative
Michael joined the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI) in 2017 as Project Coordinator of the Digital Rights Advocates Project. He previously worked at the Open Society Foundation for South Africa as Programme Officer in the Information, Expression, and Accountability Programme... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alinda Vermeer

Alinda Vermeer

Senior Legal Officer, Media Legal Defence Initiative
Alinda Vermeer is MLDI's Senior Legal Officer and joined the organisation in 2014. Alinda helps journalists, bloggers and media outlets defend cases against them, including in cases before international and regional mechanisms such as the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human... Read More →
avatar for Eleanor Marchant

Eleanor Marchant

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Oxford, Programme in Comparative Media Law & Policy
I'm a researcher specializing in communication, technology innovation, and startup culture, internet policymaking, internet shutdowns, internet connectivity as a human right, and connectivity in conflict and crisis, particularly for refugees, with a focus on the African context.Will... Read More →
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now
OB

Olumide Babalola

Managing Partner, Olumide Babalola LP
avatar for Ahmad Al Ashqar

Ahmad Al Ashqar

Judge
Judge, from PalestinePhD in Constitutional Law and Human Rights, an international expert and trainer in the field of human rights and how to use international standards in domestic courts.President of the Arab Federation of Judges


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Oya 2 (Laico)

2:15pm

Government Hacking: Corporate Resistance or Assistance?
Legislation in Australia, the UK and other countries enables authorities to compel communications service providers to assist with government hacking, also known as “equipment interference” and “remote computer access.” These assistance mandates often come with gag orders that bar the company from disclosing the actions it was compelled to take, stifling public debate about them.  What kind of conduct might be considered “government hacking” and in what circumstances can it be justified?    

Many have expressed concern that some government hacking techniques could undermine trust on the Internet and impact innocent people who are not even targets of the government. More than 100 companies including Microsoft, Cisco, and Cloudflare, signed the Cybersecurity Tech Accord, pledging that they would not help any government mount a cyberattack against innocent civilians and enterprises from anywhere, including their home countries. This may create a clash with government hacking assistance mandates. What is it reasonable for users to expect of companies when it comes to resisting government hacking? Are such accords sufficient, or does legislation need to be adopted to rein in government hacking?

Come join a stimulating discussion about government hacking and what it could mean for you.

Moderators
avatar for Greg Nojeim

Greg Nojeim

Director, Project on Freedom, Security and Technology, Center for Democracy & Technology
Cybersecurity, surveillance, United States surveillance laws, ECPA, cross border law enforcement demands for Internet users' communications, encryption

Speakers
avatar for Ilia Siatitsa

Ilia Siatitsa

Legal Officer, Privacy International
Talk to me about the right to privacy and beyond - focusing on human rights issues arising at the intersection of privacy and technology, interested in surveillance and data exploitation by governments and corporations.Find more at https://privacyinternational.org/people/3004/dr... Read More →
avatar for Alissa Starzak

Alissa Starzak

Head of Public Policy, Cloudflare
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Utique (Laico)

2:15pm

Fundraising in the Post-Election Era: How to respond to unpredictable events and prepare for them in the future.
The main goal of this session is to enable an open discussion around best practices in fundraising when nonprofit organizations are directly impacted by external events (ex. politics, natural disasters, viral funding campaigns). The initial conversation will discuss how the 2016 U.S. presidential election affected the fundraising landscape for nonprofit organizations. We will cover: 1) the funding surge in new areas of giving; 2) the wave of support for journalism & media (e.x. "Fake News"); and 3) the increase in new advocacy platforms. We will continue the conversation with storytelling examples of different nonprofit organizations that have experienced unexpected surges in revenue (ALS Association, American Red Cross, ACLU, and Planned Parenthood), how the organizations dealt with them, and how we can learn from their mistakes. Participants will take away best practices for sustainable fundraising in unpredictable circumstances.

Moderators
avatar for Louise Balsmeyer

Louise Balsmeyer

Director of Development, Freedom of the Press Foundation
Louise Balsmeyer is the Director of Development at Freedom of the Press Foundation where she oversees the organization’s fundraising goals and development operations. She has a rich background in progressive activism and previously worked as the Deputy Director of Major Gifts and... Read More →

Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Carthage 1 (Laico)

2:15pm

Landmark: Philanthropy in the 21st Century
We are seeing dramatic challenges for human rights philanthropy, with growing attacks on philanthropy, the shrinking of civic space on and offline, the difficulties of transferring funds  into increasingly authoritarian states, the explosion of data and decline of privacy, the emergence of new tools and technologies - all challenging traditional concepts of philanthropy, and its impact, value, and leadership in the 21st century.

To respond to the unique challenges of this modern tech-driven era, philanthropy, like all sectors - from media to transport to accommodation - will need to adapt to respond to new threats and opportunities that the sector face. As technology also challenges traditional concepts of human rights and social justice work in the digital age, philanthropy must also adapt to properly resource activists and social movements in ways that make sense to this new environment.

Panelists from across the globe will explore some of the key challenges, risks, and questions facing philanthropy during this next half-century as the sector adapts to become more sustainable and better support civil society and social sector partners.

Moderators
avatar for Brett Solomon

Brett Solomon

Co-Founder and Executive Director, Access Now
Brett is the Executive Director of Access Now, defending and extending the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining innovative policy, global advocacy, and direct technical support, RightsCon and grant-making, Access Now fights for human rights in the digital... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dan Blah

Dan Blah

Co-Founder, Open Technology Fund
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is the ​Founder and executive director of the Digital Rights Foundation (DRF), Pakistan, She has run the DRF since it was established in 2012, and has been a practicing lawyer since 2007, where she worked on civil​,​ criminal​ and now cyber​ litigation... Read More →
avatar for Christel Dahlskjaer

Christel Dahlskjaer

CCO, Private Internet Access
Christel Dahlskjaer is the CCO of Private Internet Access, a leading VPN service provider specialising in secure, encrypted VPN tunnels which create several layers of privacy and security to help users stay safe on the internet. She is keen on community, privacy and freedom of expression... Read More →
avatar for Melanie Greenberg

Melanie Greenberg

Managing Director, Peacebuilding, Humanity United
Melanie Greenberg is Managing Director for Peacebuilding at Humanity United, and previously served as CEO of the Alliance for Peacebuilding. Throughout her career in academia, philanthropy and the nonprofit world, Melanie has focused on how citizens work with one another -- and with... Read More →
avatar for Mosun Layode

Mosun Layode

Executive Director, African Philanthropy Forum
Mosun Layode is a development professional with over fifteen years of experience in international development and nonprofit leadership. She currently serves as the Executive Director of the African Philanthropy Forum (APF). She works extensively across Africa with established and... Read More →
avatar for Randy Newcomb

Randy Newcomb

Senior Advisor, The Omidyar Group
Randy Newcomb is a Senior Advisor at The Omidyar Group. The Omidyar Group is a diverse collection of global companies, organizations, and initiatives founded by Pierre and Pam Omidyar that strive to catalyze social impact globally. As Senior Advisor Mr. Newcomb explores future trends... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

2:15pm

Strategic Litigation against Network Shutdowns-Successes and Challenges
The main aim of the session is to highlight the challenges and successes different countries have witnessed while pursuing a law suit against network shutdowns in their respective countries. For this purpose, civil society members from different countries will be on panel including Pakistan, India and Cameroon. The moderator will lay the foundations of the discussion by explaining which countries have gone into strategic litigation. It will be followed by introduction of the guests and some discussion around following questions: Is strategic litigation an effective way to fight network shutdowns? What have been the challenges while pursuing legal case against network shutdowns? Were any threats faced by civil society for pursuing the case against network shutdowns? Why or why not the case against network shutdown has been resolved? What measures are being undertaken to initiate broader conversations around the illegality of network shutdowns? What is the way forward and how can KeepItOn community support these measures?


Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Leptis (Laico)

2:15pm

What role for regulators in the digital era?
Through this session, participants will learn about the role, powers, responsibilities and challenges faced by regulators in the digital era. In this firechat discussion will feature a moderated discussion with regulators from the telecoms and tech area to discuss how their role have evolved in the digital era, what is the impact of tech giants on their work and what actions can they take to protect users' rights.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Caspian (Palais)

3:45pm

Engaging Citizens at Scale in Restrictive Environments
This session will bring together leaders from various human rights organizations who have deep experience in global citizen engagement in traditionally hard to reach countries. Their respective specializations range from gender-based violence, the rights of migrants, preventing and countering violent extremism, and measuring trust in CSOs. They will discuss how they leverage citizen voice to hone the focus of their initiatives, boost the impact of their campaigns, enable previously “unreachable” groups, and paint an accurate picture of what any given country truly thinks about important issues. This session will also address some of the barriers and limitations of traditional research methods that have failed to keep up with the pace of technological change and how average citizens engage with new ideas in the 21st century. It is clear that there is a necessity for new solutions that provide access while at the same time providing respondents with true anonymity and security. The panelists will begin by sharing their experiences and learnings. The session will then engage the audience soliciting questions, ideas, and feedback, towards developing solutions for their global challenges.

Moderators
avatar for Mercedes Fogarassy

Mercedes Fogarassy

Portfolio Manager, Global Citizen Engagement, RIWI Corp.
Mercedes manages the Global Citizen Engagement portfolio at RIWI Corp., focusing on amplifying citizen voices for partners in the humanitarian sector, including the World Food Programme, USAID, Oxfam, Freedom House and more.RIWI is a global survey technology and sentiment analysis... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alix Lawson

Alix Lawson

Program Officer, Freedom House
I am the Program Officer at Freedom House for the Human Rights Support Mechanism, an LWA under USAID for human rights programming. My interests include human rights work and its intersection with technology.
avatar for Vijay Simhan

Vijay Simhan

Manager, Investments, Humanity United
As Investments Manager, Vijay supports Humanity United’s Human Trafficking & Labor Migration portfolio, including engaging with corporations, governments, civil society, and workers to advocate, promote, and defend the rights of workers.
avatar for Katrina Frappier

Katrina Frappier

Katrina is a Needs Assessment Consultant at the UN World Food Programme, the world’s largest humanitarian organization addressing hunger and promoting food security. In recent years, Katrina’s work has focused on exploring the use of new innovative technologies to assess the needs... Read More →
avatar for Althea Middleton-Detzner

Althea Middleton-Detzner

Director, Hate Speech and Africa Lab, PeaceTech Lab
Althea is the Director of Hate Speech Programs and the Africa Lab at PeaceTech Lab. She has worked for over a decade in the broader peacebuilding field, with expertise in nonviolent movements, civil resistance, and corporate-community conflicts. Prior to working at the Lab, Althea... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Village Stage (Laico)

3:45pm

The Future of Human Rights in the Governance of Artificial Intelligence
This session will explore how human rights frameworks can be integrated into the governance of artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies. Building on international human rights law and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, it will discuss the value the existing human rights framework brings to the conversation about “ethical AI.” With a diverse panel drawn from international organisations, civil society, academics, and private sector, the discussion will explore the varying impact of these technologies in different countries and highlight both recent accomplishments and where further research is needed to inform policy development. The rapid development and deployment of artificial intelligence has many stakeholders concerned, and in the past several years, we have witnessed a proliferation of principles documents that attempt to guide the ethical and rights-respecting development and deployment. These declarations may each have individual value, but do they represent an emerging consensus about the proper use of AI/ML tools? If a consensus is emerging, does it reflect the reality of how AI tools are being deployed globally and cross-culturally, in non-democratic states as well as democratic ones? Do current principles reflect international human rights norms, and how do they anticipate and address governance challenges?

Moderators
avatar for Jessica Fjeld

Jessica Fjeld

Assistant Director, Cyberlaw Clinic, Berkman Klein Center
avatar for Megan Metzger

Megan Metzger

Research Scholar and Associate Director for Research, Stanford University, Global Digital Policy Incubator
I work on human rights and AI, creative approaches to managing the challenges of online content, and multistakeholder approaches to solving the problems of the digital age. I have also conducted research on social media and protest in Ukraine and Turkey, and on the Russian state’s... Read More →
avatar for David Reichel

David Reichel

Project Manager, European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights

Speakers
avatar for Malavika Jayaram

Malavika Jayaram

Executive Director, Digital Asia Hub
@MalJayaram Malavika is the inaugural Executive Director of the Digital Asia Hub, a Hong Kong-based independent research think-tank incubated by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, where she is also a Faculty Associate. A technology lawyer for... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Carthage 1 (Laico)

3:45pm

Collective Solutions for Catalyzing Change to Address Technology-Facilitated Gender-Based Violence: An interactive workshop
Technology-facilitated gender-based violence (GBV) is simultaneously a global and intensely local phenomenon. Technology allows for connection – and violence – to transcend geographical space. At the same time, the catalysts, impacts, and manifestations of violence are informed by relationships, culture, and gender norms. This makes technology-facilitated GBV a many-headed hydra that is difficult to define and identify, much less address and prevent. The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) has developed a definition and conceptual framework for technology-facilitated GBV, based on an extensive literature review and formative research with global experts and those who have experienced it in Uganda and India. For our session, we propose an interactive workshop that will engage participants to learn about the issue and begin to think about actionable next steps for addressing it. In the first half of the workshop, we will introduce to this issue and our findings so far. We will share our definition and conceptual framework, which will allow participants to build their vocabulary around this issue. In the second half, we will foster rich discussions in small groups around potential solutions.

Moderators
LH

Laura Hinson

Social and Behavioral Scientist, International Center for Research on Women

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Carthage 2 (Laico)

3:45pm

A Warrant for Your DNA: What the Golden State Killer, Police, and Genetic Testing Services Share in Common
The arrest of Joseph James DeAngelo Jr, a serial killer and rapist known as the Golden State Killer, sparked public debate after law enforcement revealed they tracked him using DNA that a distant relative of DeAngelo uploaded to an ancestry matching website. With the recent explosion of these genetic testing kits, a central policy discussion will revolve around the legal rights of users and tradeoffs between security and privacy. In other words, participants should expect to see engagement on what expectation of privacy do users have under the current legal framework, and how should that framework change going forward? Are potential gains in law enforcement effectiveness sufficient to trump privacy concerns? What safeguards ought to be in place? Technical questions also abound. Are these services a reliable resource for law enforcement in the first place? How might the accuracy and reliability of DNA matching services change in the near future? To answer these questions, this panel features perspectives from former law enforcement personnel, as well as legal and forensics experts.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now
avatar for Prasanth Sugathan

Prasanth Sugathan

Legal Director, SFLC.in
Prasanth Sugathan is a lawyer and the Legal Director at SFLC.IN.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Oya 1 (Laico)

3:45pm

Tracker versus Trackee: The chasm between individuals’ understanding of online tracking and the real data collection (and processing) power of trackers and what can be done to bridge the divide
Consumer Reports and Privacy International will report on their work investigating and challenging how people are tracked and profiled. Privacy International will present and detail their work on data brokers and AdTech (November 2018) and apps tracking (published December 2018 and updated in March 2019), and Consumer Reports will present their work on online tracking and the consumer’s understanding of such tracking techniques. These projects focus on the lack of transparency and accountability in the use of tracking and how difficult it can be for individuals to understand and challenge such tracking. The goal of our session is to seek feedback on the issue of how to bridge the gap between consumer understanding and the realities of tracking technology.

Moderators
avatar for Katie McInnis

Katie McInnis

Policy Counsel, Consumer Reports
Katie McInnis is a policy counsel in Consumers Reports’s Washington DC office. Her work focuses on technology and the consumer’s right to privacy, security, control, and transparency. Before joining CR in 2016, Katie served as a Privacy & Technology Fellow at the Center for Democracy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alan M. Sears

Alan M. Sears

Researcher, Leiden University
avatar for Ilia Siatitsa

Ilia Siatitsa

Legal Officer, Privacy International
Talk to me about the right to privacy and beyond - focusing on human rights issues arising at the intersection of privacy and technology, interested in surveillance and data exploitation by governments and corporations.Find more at https://privacyinternational.org/people/3004/dr... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Oya 2 (Laico)

3:45pm

International Protocol for Open Source Investigations
In recent years, war crimes investigators and human rights defenders have come to increasingly rely on social media and other open source information to build cases for prosecution, advocate for international action in the face of human rights violations and combat mis/disinformation. The growing volume of publicly available information on the internet provides, in many situations, a first-hand point of view of what is happening on the ground in armed conflicts around the world. Such content could support the findings of commissions of inquiry or serve as powerful evidence in legal proceedings. However, in order to be admissible and given proper weight in court, investigators must be able to show that the information was collected and preserved in line with accepted international standards and demonstrate the integrity and veracity of the information based on a set methodology. When the International Criminal Court issued the first arrest warrant based primarily on open source videos in August 2017, no such standards or methodologies existed. That is why in late 2017, the UC Berkeley Human Rights Center launched an important initiative to develop an international protocol on open source investigations. In this strategic roundtable, drafters and collaborators on this protocol will speak about the process and goals of this project, as well as the needs it addresses for investigators working in a number of different contexts.  

Moderators
avatar for Lindsay Freeman

Lindsay Freeman

Senior Legal Researcher / Project Manager, Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley
Lindsay Freeman is an international criminal and human rights lawyer based in The Hague, Netherlands. As a researcher for the Human Rights Center, she leads the drafting of the International Protocol on Open Source Investigations. Her research focuses on the use of technology and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Raquel Vazquez Llorente

Raquel Vazquez Llorente

Senior Legal Advisor, eyeWitness
Raquel Vázquez Llorente is a Senior Legal Advisor at eyeWitness, where she helps bridge the gap between human rights defenders on the frontlines and investigators or prosecutors by providing guidance on the application of technology to investigations. eyeWitness has developed award-winning... Read More →
avatar for Yasmine Chubin

Yasmine Chubin

International Legal Consultant
Yasmine Chubin is an international legal consultant with over ten years of international criminal law, transitional justice, and rule of law experience. She currently serves as the Sexual and Gender Based Violence investigations expert with the Syria Justice and Accountability Centre... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Rapp

Stephen Rapp

Distinguished Fellow, US Holocaust Memorial Museum
Stephen J. Rapp is a Fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for Prevention of Genocide. He also serves as Chair of the Commission for International Justice & Accountability (CIJA) that has collected and analyzed more than 750,000 pages of documentation from... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Amilcar (Laico)

3:45pm

How Tech Firms Enable Human Rights Violations in Palestine
This session will map out and provide specific examples of how tech firms and companies enable human rights violations against Palestinians, including human rights defenders, and will discuss lessons learned to hold these firms accountable to international law as well as share business and human rights obligations and best practices related to areas of armed conflict.

Palestinians in the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and the Gaza Strip have lived under military occupation for 52 years and systemic discrimination becomes further entrenched making global tech firms more vulnerable to enabling human rights violations against Palestinians, including against human rights defenders. As global tech companies increasingly consider their obligations regarding human rights, this session seeks to identify how policy toward digital spaces impacts Palestinians on the ground and discuss human rights obligations for companies operating across borders in areas of armed conflict.

Speakers will identify how tech firms including Facebook, PayPal, Google, Booking.com and AirBnb have in varying ways enabled human rights violations or benefited from ongoing violations against Palestinians.

The session will map out how misinformation is increasingly deployed in digital spaces by rising nationalist civil society organizations to censor and eliminate legitimate human rights work and global Palestinian rights activism.

The session will equip participants to understand the human impact of digital rights policies from a rights-based perspective as it relates to international law violations in situations of armed conflict.

Moderators
avatar for Zena Agha

Zena Agha

US Policy Fellow, Al-Shabaka
My name is Zena Agha, I'm the US Policy Fellow for Al-Shabaka, the Palestinian policy network, based in New York. Al-Shabaka is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization whose mission is to educate and foster public debate on Palestinian human rights and self-determination... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Samuel B. Jones

Samuel B. Jones

President, Heartland Initiative
Sam Jones is President and Co-founder of Heartland Initiative, a practice-oriented nonprofit research organization that supports the realization of fundamental rights and freedoms of the most vulnerable people in conflict-affected areas. Heartland works from the premise that it is... Read More →
avatar for Brad Parker

Brad Parker

Senior Adviser, Policy & Advocacy, Defense for Children International - Palestine
I specialize in issues of juvenile justice and grave violations against children during armed conflict, and lead DCIP’s legal advocacy efforts on Palestinian children’s rights. I regularly write and speak on the situation of Palestinian children, particularly issues involving... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Jelsa (Laico)

3:45pm

Lookie Here: The good, the bad, and the ugly of location services
We all leave footprints. But in an era of smartphones, it’s also possible to collect them. Billions of them. Do you know who is collecting yours? Smartphones rely upon location. Sometimes this is obvious - you open an app for directions, or search for nearby recommendations. Other times, you may not realize that you are carrying a device that is regularly reporting its whereabouts to corporate databases. And the ways that these data are used and protected varies - greatly. This session is a primer about location services and location data. We will provide context on how location data are often collected, processed, stored, used, and sometimes sold. The session will explore privacy and human rights concerns, and strategies to limit potential harms and hazards. Questions and discussion are encouraged. The session is hosted by Mapbox - a location platform company that provides services like traffic predictions, geocoding, and localization used by millions of developers for their products. From its founding, Mapbox has been a privacy-first company, with protections for human rights and privacy embedded in its terms of service. Mapbox works closely with customers and partners to understand potential risks of location services and ways to proactively reduce them.

Workshop materials and slides available at http://bit.ly/MapboxRightsCon.

Speakers
avatar for Marena Brinkhurst

Marena Brinkhurst

Community Program Manager, Mapbox
Talk to me about maps, location data, Mapbox, pro bono volunteering, and using tech for positive impact! I also geek out about land rights, participatory mapping, and indigenous rights.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Cyrene (Laico)

3:45pm

Tracking Takedown Transparency Today and Tomorrow: Lessons learned and next steps for the emerging practice of transparency reporting on content moderation
As social media companies have increasingly become gatekeepers of online speech, they have also faced growing pressure to provide meaningful transparency around their takedowns of content based on violations of their terms of service. In 2018, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter were the first companies to finally start issuing transparency reports on their content moderation efforts. This strategic roundtable will survey the current state of this emerging practice and discuss how to ensure a robust future for content moderation transparency: companies that have already issued reports will share lessons learned in the implementation of their reports, companies that haven't reported will discuss the challenges they've faced, advocates and researchers will highlight fresh insights derived from the data and flag what additional data is still needed, and all will brainstorm new ideas for how best to expand the practice to include more companies and more innovative features, in a manner that will give policymakers and the public a meaningful window into platforms' content takedown practices. 2018 is the year that content moderation reporting finally became a best practice; we want to jointly strategize on how to ensure that it is standard practice by 2020.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Elder

Stephanie Elder

Automattic, Inc. | WordPress.com
avatar for Nicolas Suzor

Nicolas Suzor

Professor, Queensland University of Technology
avatar for Alex Walden

Alex Walden

Global Policy Lead for Human Rights & Free Expression, Google
Alex Walden leads Google’s work on free expression and human rights on the international policy team. Her work includes representing Google in the Global Network Initiative (GNI) and in various multilateral fora dealing with controversial content. Alex joined Google from The Raben... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Dougga (Laico)

3:45pm

Sustainable Practices Workshop - Sharing What Works
The end goal of this interactive workshop would be to co-create a first draft of a ‘best practices’ guide -- not a one size fits all solution guide, but shared space for what we learned that works. Super-pragmatic. This workshop asks its participants to share and map their best (and worst) practices ‘threat models’ & share positive practices: 1. Culture & Narrative: what do you and your community do and did you learn to build & fuel healthy, supportive impactful culture using narratives or practices that don't reinforce ‘martyrdom,’ stigma or ‘othering.'? 2. Workload: how do you and your community counter, mitigate, or prevent work overload issues, “productivity” pressure, and the pressure from community and the 'marketplace' of human rights? 3. Leadership: what are the lessons you and your community have learned for leaders/supervisors that mitigate unhealthy practices & foster sustainable ones? 4. Do No Harm Funding: what are effective ways in which funders can foster sustainable practices, address root causes of unhealthy practices and or structurally remove pressures? 5. Resourcing Mental Health: how can we build better access to psychological or psychosocial support around the world or access to tailored mental health programming, mental health education, research and resources?

Moderators
Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Biscay (Palais)

3:45pm

Hacking Hackathons with a feminist perspective
Traditional hackathons have many risks: they encourage competition and not collaboration, they are oriented to expert participants in technology, they are a hotbed of ideas that are not followed up and do not arouse any critical analysis towards technology. And in addition, a very small number of women and a diverse population always participate as an indigenous, rural population, with a disability, Afro-descendant, etc. However, the challenge of developing a proposal in an intensive period is something that appeals mainly to young people. Since 2014, Sulá Batsú has developed hackathons from a feminist approach aimed at women from all over the Central American territory and from all rural, border, indigenous, afro, and other contexts. This seeks to break with all the logic behind the hackathons, but this device is used as an instance of critical analysis of technology and creation of technological proposals as a way to give voice to all women through technology. We propose it as a workshop because we want participants to design their own female hackathons in our workshop with our methodological approach.

Moderators
Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Adean (Palais)

3:45pm

This is Not Legal Advice: How lawyers navigate troubled waters and keep the NGO afloat
Speakers
avatar for Alp Toker

Alp Toker

Executive Director, NetBlocks
Alp is founder of the netblocks.org digital rights initiative and award-winning Turkey Blocks collective, and Sakharov Fellow for Freedom of Thought with the European Parliament. He works on freedom of expression online, digital transparency and policy tooling for internet governance... Read More →
avatar for Vivek Krishnamurthy

Vivek Krishnamurthy

Clinical Attorney, Harvard Law School
I am a Clinical Attorney at the Cyberlaw Clinic at Harvard Law School and a Visiting Lecturer this year at the UC Davis School of Law. My clinical teacher and scholarship focus on the regulation of the internet as a cross-border phenomenon and on the human rights impacts of internet-based... Read More →
avatar for Dinah PoKempner

Dinah PoKempner

General Counsel, Human Rights Watch
AI, freedom of expression, privacy


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Utique (Laico)

3:45pm

Cyber Harm, Let's Avoid It: Building cybersecurity capacity that protects human rights
This interactive session focuses on discussing strategies for mitigating cyber harms in the context of human rights and human security. Setting the stage for discussion, the Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre (GCSCC) at the University of Oxford will explore a taxonomy of cyber harms, identifying types and characteristics of harm as well as the structural factors that hamper the detection of harms and contribute to the neglect of certain stakeholders groups. Representatives from civil society organisations, the private and public sector will provide complementary views. This exchange will be followed by an open discussion, with workshop participants encouraged to share their perspectives on cyber harm, grounding the conversation in real-world examples of different types of cyber harm. This moderated discussion will explore how human rights concerns that arise from cyber incidents or are otherwise technologically enabled can be addressed. Emphasising the need to protect people’s rights and interests, these efforts offer support to governments and the wider risk management community in responding to the complex threats that emanate from constantly evolving technology-driven interconnections. Through these exchanges, this session seeks to provide new impulses for the development of best practices and advance an inclusive understanding of priority areas for future action.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jakob Bund

Jakob Bund

Research Associate, Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre, University of Oxford
Jakob Bund is a Research Associate at the University of Oxford’s Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre, focused on the analysis of strategy-, defense-, and regulation-related aspects of national cybersecurity postures. In this capacity, he is leading the development of a comprehensive... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
El Jem (Laico)

3:45pm

From Crypto-wars to Crypto-Peace: How do we improve encryption policy in the real world?
This session will hep us figure out what civil society organizations can do to help our home nations develop considered, pragmatic, and actionable position on encryption and lawful access. Public discussions have largely failed to deliver this, with governments emphasizing the threat of criminal activity from "going dark", and civil society emphasizing security threats from any lawful access measures. We know that encryption provides important protection for all of us. We also know that encryption technologies get used by organized crime groups, terrorists and other "bad actors". The Golden Age of Surveillance is coming to a close and countries need to figure out how the government can provide public safety without requiring surveillance that destroys trust, privacy and individual freedoms.

If law enforcement and technology communities continue don't start talking, we risk ending up with bad law that makes our societies less secure and less private, without making things any easier for law enforcement. We need to come together and find solutions to that are realistic, rational and doable. This session will seek to understand how we can work together and with law enforcement to keep our communities safe and enable our citizens to use robust encryption technologies.

Moderators
avatar for Ben Creet

Ben Creet

Policy Manager, InternetNZ
Ben Creet is InternetNZ’s policy manager and one of New Zealand’s leading technology policy specialists. He leads a team of policy professionals who work for an Internet that is secure, open, and for all New Zealanders.Ben is a policy analyst, cyber-security professional and technology... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now
SS

Sally Shipman Wentworth

Vice President, Global Policy Development, Internet Society


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hannibal (Laico)

3:45pm

Getting a Handle on Facial Recognition Tech
Facial recognition technology has become one of the most visible and pervasive technologies, increasingly used by private companies and governments alike. With each headline, awareness of the risks linked to its usage is rising, and increasingly more stakeholders are calling for regulation or the development of principles to guide the development and deployment of facial recognition technology in public spaces. 

Attention has been further driven to this issue when San Francisco banned the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies, shortly after followed by Amazon shareholders who proposed to ban sales of facial recognition technology (Rekognition) to governments. The latter vote failed, but the numbers of those who supported the ban were significant.

Speakers
avatar for Leandro Ucciferri

Leandro Ucciferri

Policy Analyst, Asociación por los Derechos Civiles
I'm a lawyer, policy analyst and researcher working at the Association for Civil Rights (ADC in Spanish), a not-for-profit, independent, NGO founded in 1995, based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. My work focuses mostly on privacy issues. https://leandro.im
TE

Tim Engelhardt

OHCHR (UN Human Rights)
avatar for Verónica Arroyo

Verónica Arroyo

Latin America Policy Associate, Access Now
@veroluiza My work is focuses on data protection, privacy, surveillance and digital security in Latin America.I am also Vice Chair of the Youth Observatory (ISOC Youth SIG)


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Elyssa (Laico)

3:45pm

Keeping students safe and free: creating a shared statement of concerns around social media surveillance in education
This session is intended to bring together experts, advocates, and other stakeholders to discuss a set of considerations and concerns arising out of the surveillance and monitoring of K-12 students on social media (Instagram, Facebook, etc.), through automated tools and individual monitoring. This document, which we expect to be able to share in advance of the conference, came out of a workshop the Brennan Center and the Center for Democracy and Technology co-hosted in the United States in February 2019. The workshop convened educators, experts in privacy, civil liberties, and civil rights, social media platform representatives, law enforcement, and school chief information officers to discuss social media monitoring and other tech-based school safety efforts. In this session, participants can expect to take part in a robust discussion about the draft statement of concerns and contribute to refining and expanding it. We will also provide a brief background on how social media monitoring of K-12 students currently operates. We especially welcome input from international and diverse perspectives, as well as input on how best to make the statement a useful, dynamic resource for stakeholders concerned about the expansion of surveillance into schools.

Moderators
avatar for Rachel Levinson-Waldman

Rachel Levinson-Waldman

Senior Counsel, LNS Program, Brennan Center for Justice

Speakers
ND

Natasha Duarte

Policy Analyst, Center for Democracy & Technology


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Limes (Laico)

3:45pm

Landmark: The Global State of Surveillance Tech - In Conversation with UN Special Rapporteurs
Landmark sessions cover the core trending issues that have emerged from the RightsCon Program. These sessions elevate issues that deserve greater attention to support creating the most impactful programming possible. Landmarks are hosted in the RightsCon main stage at the Palais and benefit from greater production support, including translations.

The use of surveillance tech to monitor and target activists, users at risk, human rights defenders, and journalists is a global issue. In the hands of authoritarian regimes, unchecked law enforcement agencies and bad actors, commercial malware and sophisticated cyber surveillance are enabling egregious violations of human rights, and existing mechanisms for justice are insufficient to hold perpetrators to account. When confronted, tech companies defer the responsibility of regulating their products to governments, and policymakers deflect (if not flat out deny) their culpability in expanding surveillance programs.

How do we formulate policy solutions which can be replicated across the globe? What do we need to do to create accountability and justice for those whose human rights have been abused at the hands of spyware?

The United Nations is a critical space for debating issues around human rights, technology, and surveillance. Over the past two years, several UN Special Rapporteurs have produced robust research on this topic, supported by numerous consultations with civil society. The next frontier is identifying how to use these findings for collective civil society action, with the aim of establishing clear international accountability for the commercial surveillance market and its detrimental impact on human rights. The discussion will also help to demystify UN processes, including the potential role of Special Rapporteurs and other supranational actors, for advocates and campaigners, and will raise awareness of forthcoming reports.

Moderators
avatar for Lucie Krahulcova

Lucie Krahulcova

Policy Analyst, Access Now
Policy Analyst for Australia and Asia Pacific at the Access Now. Working on export controls, surveillance, government hacking, encryption, law enforcement, Internet of Things, vulnerability disclosure... Let's talk!

Speakers
avatar for Clément Nyaletsossi Voule

Clément Nyaletsossi Voule

Special Rapporteur on Rights to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and of Association, United Nations
Clément Nyaletsossi VOULE, a national from Togo, has been appointed as United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and of Association in March 2018. Prior to his appointment, he led the International Service for Human Rights (ISHR) work to support... Read More →
avatar for Michel Forst

Michel Forst

Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, United Nations
In June 2014, Mr. Michel Forst (France) was appointed by the President of the Human Rights Council as the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders. Mr. Forst has extensive experience on human rights issues, including human rights defenders, the rights of children... Read More →
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate... Read More →
avatar for Agnès Callamard

Agnès Callamard

UN Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions
Dr. Agnes Callamard was appointed the UN Special Rapporteur on Extra-Judicial summary or arbitrary Executions, on 1 August 2016. Dr. Callamard (France) has a distinguished career in human rights and humanitarian work globally, in civil society organizations, the United Nations and... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

3:45pm

Bridge the Gap: Bringing Your Case to the U.N.
This interactive workshop will aim to bridge the gap of the work between on-the-ground activists and international semi-judicial bodies. The complaint procedures at the United Nations Human Rights Council are sometimes intimidating to navigate. By breaking down these procedures in simple steps and guiding activists through the available legal arguments, activists will be able to use the procedures as an advocacy tool to advance their causes. Using case studies, the workshop will discuss the mechanisms of UN special procedures, with a focus on the procedure of the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention.

Moderators
JP

Joy Park

Legal Counsel, Human Rights Foundation

Speakers
avatar for Prachi Vidwans

Prachi Vidwans

Research Associate, Human Rights Foundation
A research associate at the Human Rights Foundation (HRF), where I work on the intersection between authoritarianism and tech, drug policy, human trafficking, and more. I work closely with activists and have a special interest in authoritarianism in Asia. Let's talk!


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Caspian (Palais)

3:45pm

Votek: e-Governance solution for participatory democracy
The session is about highlighting the importance of combining online technology within the governance and civil society sector from sharing a good case practice of an organization that succeeded in this implementation . Thus the session will be structured as the following : -Presentation of VOTEK Organization : *History : when did the organization started , the context of the idea generation . *Problem & solution offered *Vision , Mission and Target *Partners (Cynapsys , iFES, Municipalities .. ) . - Cynapsys ( GFI Tunisia ) Intervention *Presentation of GFI Tunisia part of GFI World : 20000 ees allover the world *Presentation of the CSR Strategy withing the tunisian subsidiary: the SDGs as a priority *the GFI-VoteK engagement : common objectifs : e-governance for Tunisia *Investing in the Tunisian democracy : Allocated resources, budget, time, expertise to make a success of this initiative *Dream coming true … *Tech Demo: Presenting the digital platform : Key features , the choice of the colors , layout , how it is userfriendly , tools used . -Future Plans of the Organization and a call to Partnerships . -Q&A with the audience .

Moderators
avatar for Amal Guidara

Amal Guidara

Legal Counsel and compliance Officer, GFI TUNISIE
I work in within the international legal team of GFI group (a multinational specialized in IT development) based in Paris, as the country legal advisor for the Tunisian Subsidiary of GFI GROUP .I also have always been an active human Rights defender within the Civil society in Tunisia... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sana Nasri

Sana Nasri

HR Director, Gfi Tunisia
- CSR Policies & UN Global Compact Program- HR Strategy and Company's Culture- Change Management


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Leptis (Laico)

3:45pm

"Data Driven" Foreign Aid and "Digital Development" Strategies: Are we disrupting disenfranchisement - or scaling It?
Come join us for a frank conversation about digital development programming, power structures, ethical design, and how blue sky “digital development principles” actually play out for people on the ground. Dragana Kaurin, Executive Director of Localization Lab, will walk us through refugees’ experience with European and UNHCR data collection requirements. Grace Githaiga, Co-Convenor of KICTANet, will provide insights into Kenyans’ experience with a forced Digital ID process. And Mikael Baker, Senior Digital Development Advisor for USAID, will speak to USAID’s new guide, Using Data Responsibly, and provide insights into how a major governmental institution is trying to map implementation to principles.
 
Most of all, though, we want to hear from you! Come join us for a conversation in which we ask: where are the voices of the "beneficiaries" of foreign assistance in digital development strategies, and how are their perspectives and rights informing the decisions donors and INGOs make with regard to data collection, aggregation and use within foreign aid? With current legal and procurement structures, and the political drivers, inherent in foreign aid, can our current assistance structures truly "empower beneficiaries" in new or powerful ways by shifting to data-driven or digital strategies, or are these moves primarily designed to diminish costs and increase efficiency among large Western institutions? Alternatively, could digital development practices be transformative, and allow us to disrupt what we ask of each other, and what donors can give back to the communities they strive to serve? Let’s explore it together.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Grace Githaiga

Grace Githaiga

Director, Kenya, Kictanet
Grace Githaiga is the Co-Convenor of the Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet), a multi-stakeholder platform for people and institutions interested and involved in ICT policy and regulation (www.kictanet.or.ke). She has recently joined the Ushahidi board and also sit on advisory committees of several ICT related organisations. Her areas of interests are in ICT policy research and analysis... Read More →
avatar for Mikael Baker

Mikael Baker

Senior ICT4D Advisor, USAID Global Development Lab
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Founder & Director, Localization Lab
Dragana Kaurin is a human rights researcher and ethnographer working at the intersection of technology, human rights and migration. She is the founder and executive director of Localization Lab, a non-profit organization that works on technology adoption with local communities, research... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
L'Escale (Laico)

3:45pm

Prepare Don't Panic: Strategize a human rights-based response to deepfake technologies, synthetic media, and increasing volumes of visual misinformation
Videos, audio and memes, often crudely edited or recycled and re-contextualized, play a critical role in misinformation, influence operations, ‘fake news’ and in inciting violence. New sophisticated, personalized audio and video manipulations called “deepfakes,” as well as other forms of AI-generated and manipulated “synthetic media” that allow changes/additions to videos add to the problem. These media forms will amplify, expand, and alter existing problems around trust in information, verification, and weaponization of online spaces. To address this proactively, a range of approaches are being considered by platforms, independent technologists and start-ups, journalists and news organizations, human rights and CS orgs, regulators and policy-makers. In the session you'll learn about proposed solutions/approaches to address deepfakes and synthetic media. A series of short interventions/provocations will start discussion, then we'll structure an interactive conversation around real possibilities for policy, platform, civil society action/reaction. We'll focus on applying an international human rights lens (and one that prioritizes marginalized communities and vulnerable populations): *Who should be involved and what forms of multi-stakeholder collaboration are key? *How do we preserve/uphold human rights in developing responses to new forms of misinformation? *What roles should companies and public policy play? *What approaches should a human rights community support?

Moderators
avatar for Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory

Program Director, WITNESS
In short....video, human rights, citizen participation, role of companies, AI and deep fakes/content moderation, live video and experiential activismIn long...Sam Gregory is Program Director of WITNESS (www.witness.org), which supports anyone anywhere to use video and technology to... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jake Lucchi

Jake Lucchi

Head of AI and Data Value, Google Asia Pacific
AI, data, content


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Elydhafa (Laico)

3:45pm

From Failure to Hockeystick Growth - Human Centered Design and Lean Start-Up to Scale Social Impact
We will discuss the role of human centered design and lean start up in successful development and scaling of digital technologies. We will hear from social entrepreneurs engaging in best practices for innovation to accelerate the impact and scale of solutions to the world’s most intractable challenges. We will also hear from the leaders using human centered design to design solutions to reach the SDGs. We will hear from lean start-ups in the social good space and hear about origin stories and how products went from failure to iteration to finally success.

Moderators
Speakers
SM

Shabnam Mojtahedi

Benetech
I am a lawyer focused on rule of law and human rights in the MENA region. At Benetech, I am leading efforts to apply artificial intelligence to help civil society organizations pursue justice and accountability in Syria and beyond.
GB

Georgia Bullen

Executive Director, Simply Secure


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Celtic (Palais)

3:45pm

Improving the Net: Applying UNESCO’s internet universality R.O.A.M indicators for evidence-based policy-making
Following a two-year process of a truly inclusive, open and multi-stakeholder consultation with over 2000 experts from all regions and stakeholders communities, UNESCO takes the occasion to present its latest outcome of Internet Universality R.O.A.M indicators, as well as preliminary results from using them. To take forward the resolution endorsing their voluntary use by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Council of IPDC in November 2018, UNESCO now engages with all Rightscon stakeholders about applying these indicators in their own countries. UNESCO’s Internet Universality indicators aim to assess levels of achievement, in individual countries, of the four fundamental ROAM principles which advocate for an Internet that is based on human Rights (R), that is Open (O), Accessible to all (A) and nurtured by Multistakeholder participation (M). After a short presentation of the Internet Indicators and the launch of the forthcoming UNESCO publication “Steering AI and advanced ITC's for Knowledge Societies”, UNESCO will engage in a debate with speakers and the audience about the implementation of the indicators. Speakers will share their experiences of pre-testing, piloting, and preliminary operationalization of the indicators, as well as the positive impacts of the project to improve national Internet policies, empower individuals and contribute to sustainable development.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights
Rebecca MacKinnon is a leading advocate for digital freedom of expression and privacy around the world. Author of the award-winning book, Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle For Internet Freedom (Basic Books, 2012), she is founding Director of the Ranking Digital Rights... Read More →
avatar for Dima Samaro

Dima Samaro

Dima Samaro is a Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Policy Associate at Access Now. She works closely with the Policy team conducting policy analysis and promoting human rights activism on the internet in the MENA region. Before joining Access Now, Dima served as a legal researcher... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Carthage 3 (Laico)

3:45pm

Network Disruptions in Times of Conflict: Strategies for circumvention and resistance
In this session, participants will come together to discuss the impact of network disruption and internet censorship in times of conflict, and what strategies people have taken to circumvent it. A diverse group of regional researchers and activists, network measurers, and circumvention tool designers will come together to bring their own unique perspective on the effect of disruptions and censorship in times of conflict, and how the the impact can be mitigated. Whether a state or non-state actor is initiating these disruptions, they often have dire consequences for the people experiencing them, hindering their ability to communicate and their access to reliable news sources; and limiting their access to emergency services. The discussion will build on the existing work of the participants and hopefully inform future research and the development of circumvention tools. (For the AccessNow folks reading this, I have confirmed NetBlocks and Psiphon, but am waiting on them to tell me who. Potentially Helmi Noman who researches Yemen too. Very happy to add anyone else Access might recommend to this session).

Wednesday June 12, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Oya 3 (Laico)

5:15pm

Empowering the Next Generation of Digital Citizens: A continued push for progress
At RightsCon 2018 (On the Shoulders of Giants: Empowering the Next Generation of Digital Citizens), we began a conversation about opportunities for young people to harness the power of connectivity to raise their voices and become agents of change. We also discussed potential obstacles. This session will seek to revisit this important theme, consider progress and build on the discussions that began in 2018. We will discuss recent research on youth digital citizenship and consider insights shared by young people and their carers, in other forums, such as the UNICEF / GSMA workshop at Eurochild where we were able to test the hypotheses generated at RightsCon 2018. We will also encourage participants to share information on current activities, so that we can learn from each other's work. We are building an ever clearer picture of how we can best support young people in using connectivity to express their views and advocate for change, and as more young people show us the way themselves, we will use this session to learn, to celebrate progress made by the community, and to explore opportunities to lift and support each other's efforts in this space.

Moderators
avatar for Natasha Jackson

Natasha Jackson

Head of Public Policy & Consumer Affairs, GSMA

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Elyssa (Laico)
  • Host Organization GSMA

5:15pm

Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) Open Forum
The Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) is an intergovernmental coalition of 30 countries committed to advancing Internet freedom – free expression, association, assembly, and privacy online – worldwide. This Open Forum session will provide participants with the opportunity to learn more about the FOC's latest activities under Ghana's Chairmanship of the Coalition and the FOC's priorities under the Program of Action for 2019-2020. This session will include the opportunity to learn about the FOC's latest Joint Statement. In this session RightsCon participants will be encouraged to engage directly with the panellists, consisting of FOC Members and Members of the FOC Advisory Network. Participants in the session will be invited to pose questions and comments, and participate in a lively discussion on promoting and protecting human rights in the face of ongoing and emerging threats to freedom online.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Lisa Vermeer

Lisa Vermeer

Senior Policy Officer, Dutch MFA
Senior Policy Advisor on Human Rights and InternetDutch Focal Point for the Freedom Online CoalitionManaging Dutch Internet Freedom project portfolio Human Rights FundFormer advisor to Dutch MPs on EU Justice and Home affairs, former research fellow at the Scientific Council for Government... Read More →
avatar for Wafa Ben-Hassine

Wafa Ben-Hassine

Global Policy Counsel, Access Now
Wafa Ben-Hassine is a New York qualified attorney specializing in international law and technology. She is currently a Global Policy Counsel for Access Now, an international non-profit organization defending and extending human rights in the digital age. In her current role, she manages... Read More →
avatar for Albert Antwi-Boasiako

Albert Antwi-Boasiako

National Cybersecurity Advisor, National Cyber Security Centre/Ministry of Communications
Dr. Albert Antwi-Boasiako is the National Cybersecurity Advisor, responsible for advising the Government of Ghana through the Ministry of Communications on the implementation of Ghana’s national cybersecurity policy and strategy. Albert is also a Cyber Security Expert with the Interpol... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Leptis (Laico)

5:15pm

Lightning Talks: The cost of speaking up – defending freedom of expression
eSNI: an easy technical way to end censorship today, which no tech company wants (A19)

Description: HTTPS encrypts information transferred to the websites we use every day. That means to anyone snooping 'on the wire' almost all your communication will look like complete gibberish. However, there is one major exception — at the time your computer connects to the website, it leaks the domain name of that website. Most times, it's not a big deal. It's as a minor privacy issue in the western democracies and is treated as such. But that is a matter of free speech & censorship for millions of people around the world. Right now oppressive regimes around the world 'snoop on the wire' and block connections to websites they deem as a danger to their power. We can take away that technological power to censor the internet from authoritarian governments. Solution is to encrypt the domain name you connect to just as the rest of the communication. That technology is called encrypted SNI and it is already implemented by Firefox & Cloudflare (you need both browser and cloud provider for plug the leak). The last missing piece of a puzzle is eSNI adoption by major players: Microsoft, Apple, Amazon and most importantly, Google. The thing is, Google and other major tech companies are reluctant to implement this change for a business reason. eSNI will take away power to censor the internet from oppressive regimes. Most likely, this regimes will put big internet companies in front of a choice — do the censoring or leave the country. This is where our voices could make a difference.

Speaker: Samat Galimov

The Dissernet Project ()

Description: I demonstrate how activists in Russia expose corruption of public officials and university leadership by finding plagiarism in doctoral theses and academic papers. Data analysis tools are discussed that make exposure of academic fraud possible at industrial scales (ca. 10,000 theses, ca. 20,000 papers per year)

Speaker: Andrew V. Zayaki

#speakup barometer: Assessing the drivers and barriers of digital participation (DW Akademie)

Description: Are you connected to the Internet? If so, congratulations! But does that mean that you are an active citizen in the digital sphere? Not necessarily. In fact, access alone is not the answer: People need more than an internet connection to fully take advantage of the opportunities provided by the web. This lightning talk will introduce DW Akademie’s concept of digital participation and shed light on the result of their #speakup barometer project that assesses digital inclusion on a country basis. To date the project has assessed digital participation in eight countries worldwide, highlighting the respective drivers and barriers of digital inclusion. One outcome of the project has become clear: Digital inclusion is multifaceted. It may involve the use of technology, it addresses societal norms and it sometimes challenges the regulatory environment. The spreading of fake news leads to mistrust towards media and journalists, hate speech is flaring up on social media and powerful hashtag campaigns are changing politics. These trends, as well as digital literacy, digital rights, the innovation landscape and social norms, all impact a person’s ability to rightfully participate in the digital revolution – or not.

Speaker: Steffen Leidel

New media, old censorship: Defending press freedom across borders and media platforms (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Description: Authorities throughout the Middle East and North Africa have ramped up online surveillance, website blocking and hacking -- even as they jam satellite signals, seize newspapers, and set fire to printing presses. Current discourse around media and censorship tend to reflect assumptions that all media activity -- and therefore, censorship efforts -- are inexorably moving into the digital sphere. Yet this view ignores the central role that print, radio, and TV play in news dissemination throughout the region, and how these platforms still constitute a front line in the battle against censorship. This lightning talk will examine the different types of censorship in the region, ranging from the widespread blocking of websites in Egypt and hacking campaigns in Saudi Arabia to censorship at the printing press in Algeria and Sudan, and draw parallels and contrasts between the types of coverage and the audiences reached by different platforms, as well as how authorities target media outlets across platforms. The talk will also invite attendees to collaborate across platforms and sectors and suggest approaches for a unified response to censorship region-wide.

Speaker: Justin Shilad

It took a year for civil society to start reacting to censorship in Ukraine (Internews Europe)

Description: We want to share the dynamic of civil society when reacting to a new "never seen before" threat. Internet censorship came to Ukraine unexpected in May, 2017 - big platforms were blocked (Russian social networks, email providers, payment systems etc), actually the most popular websites in Ukraine were blocked. We had human rights defenders organizations at the moment, as well as independent media outlets and NGOs, however, almost nobody reacted to this censorship. Nobody understood what happened, what is censorship, why it's bad and how to deal with it. It took a year for our civil society to start somehow fight the censorship and communicate it in public, it will probably take few more years to do it more effectively. I want to share the dynamic of this capacity rising and show how long it actually takes.

Speaker: Mykola Kostynyan

Speakers
avatar for Steffen Leidel

Steffen Leidel

DW Akademie
Steffen Leidel ist Head of Digital Innovation and Knowledge Management at Deutsche Welle Akademie. He works on digital strategy and consulting in media development and is project director of the #speakup barometer (dw.com/barometer) Since 2005 he has been working as a journalism trainer... Read More →
avatar for Samat Galimov

Samat Galimov

A19
Former CTO leading independent Russian media Meduza.ioInterested in censorship & censorship circumvention.
avatar for Mykola Kostynyan

Mykola Kostynyan

Community Engagement Manager, AUDS project (Internews Europe)
Digital security, org security, audits, trainings, ToT, Ukrainewire: bezlimitchykSignal/WhatsApp: +380959104491


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
The BeeHive (Palais)

5:15pm

Multistakeholder Models of Content Moderation: A global perspective
This workshop will function as an opportunity to develop the practical terms of a participatory, multistakeholder social media council(s) for the moderation of online content. The need for a multistakeholder model arises from several trends: first, recent government legislation which poses threats to freedom of expression online; second, the extraordinary control over content exercised by private companies whose platforms increasingly represent the public square; and third, the urgent need to combat harmful online content, while protecting and respecting freedom of expression. With input from speakers who are experts in online content and human rights, and specifically the unique challenges faced by those in the Global South, this workshop will address practical questions for building a feasible multistakeholder social media council. Some key questions will include: How should we properly structure such a body to ensure effectiveness, buy-in from governments and platforms, and protection of human rights principles? Who should be a member of such a body? How should members be selected? What will be the specific function of such a body: will it review individual appeals on content, or serve as an advisory body to help establish global standards? Should there be a global body, or national- or regional-level bodies?

Moderators
avatar for Megan Metzger

Megan Metzger

Research Scholar and Associate Director for Research, Stanford University, Global Digital Policy Incubator
I work on human rights and AI, creative approaches to managing the challenges of online content, and multistakeholder approaches to solving the problems of the digital age. I have also conducted research on social media and protest in Ukraine and Turkey, and on the Russian state’s... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Prasanth Sugathan

Prasanth Sugathan

Legal Director, SFLC.in
Prasanth Sugathan is a lawyer and the Legal Director at SFLC.IN.
avatar for Rasha Abdulla

Rasha Abdulla

Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication, AUC, The American University in Cairo
Dr. Rasha Abdulla is Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication at the American University in Cairo. She has a Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. She is the recipient of several teaching and research awards, including the AUC Excellence... Read More →
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is the ​Founder and executive director of the Digital Rights Foundation (DRF), Pakistan, She has run the DRF since it was established in 2012, and has been a practicing lawyer since 2007, where she worked on civil​,​ criminal​ and now cyber​ litigation... Read More →
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate... Read More →
avatar for 'Gbenga Sesan

'Gbenga Sesan

Executive Director, Paradigm Initiative
‘Gbenga Sesan is the Executive Director of Paradigm Initiative, a social enterprise that works on digital rights and digital inclusion across Africa, with offices in Cameroon, Nigeria, Tanzania, Togo and Zambia. Originally trained as an Electronic & Electrical Engineer at Obafemi... Read More →
avatar for Pierre François Docquir

Pierre François Docquir

Head of Media Freedom, ARTICLE 19
Finding an approach for online content moderation that protects freedom of expression has become an increasingly pressing concern.ARTICLE 19 proposes the creation of Social Media Councils (SMCs) – a multi- stakeholder accountability mechanism that would provide an open, transparent... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Carthage 2 (Laico)

5:15pm

My Rights, My Internet: Understanding global sentiment towards life online
During this discussion, we will share findings from the recently completed 2019 Global Internet Sentiment Survey (GISS), and discuss what these data mean for the future of safety, trust, and access of the Internet. The GISS provides a unique perspective on perceptions of the Internet and how perceptions shape users’ interactions with and on the Internet. This year’s survey has a particular focus on digital identity, asking respondents about their personal fears and biases when it comes to engaging online. Using these data as a starting point for the discussion, this session will engage attendees and speakers in identifying ways of further collaboration to improve everyday citizens’ experiences online.


The survey, conducted by RIWI in partnership with RNW Media and Access Now is key to the RightsCon community, with the intention of creating a continuous conversation on the perceptions of these topics beyond the conclusion of RightsCon Tunis. Over 50,000 respondents engaged with the survey from 10 countries, many in which these data cannot be collected using traditional means. All data were gathered using RIWI’s proprietary methodology which puts the respondent’s personal safety and privacy at the center ensuring no personally identifiable information is collected. 

Speakers
avatar for Michele Ernsting

Michele Ernsting

Director Programme Dev., RNW Media
Digital communities, alternative civic space, youth inclusion, love, sex & relationships, data for advocacy and honey bees.
avatar for Carolyn Tackett

Carolyn Tackett

Global Campaign Strategist, Access Now
Carolyn is the Global Campaign Strategist at Access Now — an organization working to defend and extend the rights of users at risk around the world. She works with a diverse team to design advocacy campaigns, raise awareness, and fight for human rights in the digital age. Feel free... Read More →
avatar for Mercedes Fogarassy

Mercedes Fogarassy

Portfolio Manager, Global Citizen Engagement, RIWI Corp.
Mercedes manages the Global Citizen Engagement portfolio at RIWI Corp., focusing on amplifying citizen voices for partners in the humanitarian sector, including the World Food Programme, USAID, Oxfam, Freedom House and more.RIWI is a global survey technology and sentiment analysis... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Jelsa (Laico)

5:15pm

Tumblr, Porn, Sex Work and Queer Lives on a Healthy Internet: What happens when a platform decides to kill communities?
In late 2018, Tumblr announced it was banning NSFW content. This impacts many existing well-developed communities that exist on tumblr. LGBTQ communities have provided support for countless youth who are trying to find safe environments to connect with similar-minded people. Feminist pornographers curate complex and sophisticated feeds of female-focused adult content that is difficult-to-impossible to find elsewhere. Sex workers use the platform to safely promote, communicate, and collaborate in ways that are increasingly difficult in the wake of FOSTA/SESTA legislation, an issue with often life-threatening real-world implications. All these communities and more -- nude models of colour, fandom content creators, transfolk gender activists, and countless others -- are being wiped out by this ban. And while Tumblr does not have a legal obligation to host any of this content, the sudden and short-notice sterilization of millions of accounts, years of content, and archives of queer history is one with wide-reaching effects. What responsibility do platforms have to existing communities? Is it possible for a marginalized digital community to develop at scale without the infrastructure and goodwill of a major corporation? And what happens in a diaspora of hundreds of thousands of content creators, with few platforms willing to host them?

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
L'Escale (Laico)

5:15pm

Who Has Your Back? Censorship Edition 2019 Launch
Join EFF for the launch of this year's Who Has Your Back report. Building on last year's first-ever censorship edition of Who Has Your Back, this report examines major platforms' content moderation policies and adherence to best practices like transparency, notice, and appeals. Kurt Opsahl and Jillian C. York will share our results, including which companies scored the highest, which lagged behind, the improvements we are seeing across the industry, and the weak spots where we need to keep pushing for better human rights-based content moderation policies.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Amilcar (Laico)

5:15pm

Using Machine Learning for Human Rights
In this session, we will explore opportunities in using machine learning for advancing human rights. The first 20 minutes of the session will be used to showcase examples of applications of machine learning for human rights and outlining some of the opportunity areas for the human rights movement, drawing on the joint experience of Amnesty International and Element AI. The presenters have, collectively, extensive experience in human rights, machine learning, and developing technological applications for human rights. The remainder of the session will be run in a 'world cafe' format with table conversations around different sub-topics. Tables will discuss specific opportunity areas, risks associated with using machine learning for human rights purposes, as well as constraints that are limiting the exploitation of existing opportunities. Each table will have a conversation lead from a different organisation, in order to bring diverse experiences to the discussion.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Milena Marin

Milena Marin

Senior Advisor for Tactical Research, Amnesty International
I have over ten years’ experience working at the intersection of technology, data and social good on issues like human rights, public sector transparency, anti-corruption and open data. Currently, I am with Amnesty’s Evidence Lab, where I work on complex human rights investigations... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Carthage 1 (Laico)

5:15pm

Biometric Technologies and Data as Tools for the ‘Responsible’ and ‘Proper’ Identification of Terrorists: A human rights inventory
The distinct value and practical benefits of the use of biometric data is increasingly acknowledged and emphasized in counter-terrorism regulation, as also reflected in the quasi-regulatory efforts by the UN Security Council requiring States in its resolution 2396 to “develop and implement systems to collect biometric data”. Despite the rapid advance of biometric technology and its widespread usage, human rights analysis and guidance on its use remains limited and underdeveloped. Prominently, while resolution 2396 calls on States to implement their obligations relating to biometric data collection in compliance with human rights law, it does not provide specific guidance on how to achieve this nor does it set any human rights benchmarks. 

The Human Rights Center at the University of Minnesota Law School supports the work of the mandate of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism. In this capacity, the Center assists the Special Rapporteur in developing a set of principles on the human rights- compliant collection, acquisition, retention, processing and sharing of biometric data in the context of preventing and countering terrorism.

This session will constitute an integral part of the consultation process conducted by the Special Rapporteur’s mandate. Aimed at bridging this knowledge gap and drawing on the multidisciplinary and cross-regional expertise of participants, it will focus on mapping out salient human rights implications of the use of biometric technologies and data and explore existing good practices and lessons learned.

Moderators
avatar for Krisztina Huszti-Orban

Krisztina Huszti-Orban

Research fellow/ Senior Legal Advisor to the UN Special Rapporteur on Counter-terrorism and Human Rights, University of Minnesota
Krisztina is a research fellow and lecturer in law at the Human Rights Center of the University of Minnesota. She also serves as senior legal advisor to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering... Read More →

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
El Jem (Laico)

5:15pm

Free Speech Or Hate Speech: Should Online Due Diligence Change?
New hate groups are appearing in rapid, successive fashion. When the public is outraged at you as a provider, how do you determine if a new group on your network is a hate group? How much research do you do as a provider to determine if they have violated your terms of service agreement - yet? This session will discuss difficult real and possible scenarios. We’ll show how Internet companies can set clear and open criteria around acceptable usage.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Milton Mueller is the O.G. of I.G. He directs the Internet Governance Project, a center for research and engagement on global Internet governance. Mueller's books Will the Internet Fragment? (Polity, 2017), Networks and States: The global politics of Internet governance (MIT Press... Read More →
avatar for Alissa Starzak

Alissa Starzak

Head of Public Policy, Cloudflare


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Celtic (Palais)

5:15pm

The Incomplete Guide to Harassment Campaigns; Focusing on Harassment Outside of the Global North
The Incomplete but Growing List of Harassment Campaigns is an initiative to document and analyze harassment campaigns in social media. So far, the list spans over a hundred cases from 2002 to now, and is starting to distill and analyze political harassment campaigns on social networks, hoaxes, targeted harassment campaigns and campaigns that can be a mixture of political and targeted harassment, or are all of the above. Caroline, with Rima Sghaier, are expanding this resource focus on harassment campaigns beyond North America, and Europe. Harassment campaigns are a global phenomena, that affects those that are marginalized. Let's build resources and a repository of experiences that center on stories beyond white women's harassment. This session, will function like a roundtable, will focus on the list itself, and then how to document harassment in a kind of leaks initiatives. This session will also function like a workshop and will be open for people to submit harassment campaigns that are not well covered, or well known. Part of the session will involve ideating on how to create better transparency and coverage on online harassment cases outside of the Western world, better ways to collect and verify cases, and recommendations for platform improvement.


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Limes (Laico)

5:15pm

Data, Technology, and the Global Gender Gap
Many studies and reports have demonstrated that a gender gap is pervasive and persistent in areas related to data and technology. The gap is pervasive in that it exists nearly anywhere one looks, and the gap is persistent in that it continues to exist over time, despite efforts to reduce it. After a brief introduction to the problem, this session will seek to actively engage participants and speakers, in an effort to explore recent research and to suggest new research for effectively addressing the issues.

Moderators
avatar for Isaac Rutenberg

Isaac Rutenberg

Director, Strathmore University

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Carthage 3 (Laico)

5:15pm

Is Open-Source Your Unicorn? Dialogue on the sustainability, data security, and ethics of human rights apps
Global activists and human rights organizations know that data privacy and security should never be taken for granted. In practice, though, we often default to commercial closed source tools because they are so easy to use. And then there is the lingering question: are open-source alternatives really any better? This session will help human rights organizations walk through the seemingly complex world of open-source software to understand what they need to do to make and use more open-source tools. This session invites human rights organizations from around the world to discuss the considerations and challenges of using and developing open-source tools. In this fishbowl setting, participants will have the opportunity to engage with and learn from thought leaders, developers, human rights activists and technologists about the ins and outs of starting and sustaining open-source projects to: - Debate the ethical and security imperatives, misconceptions, and responsibilities for open source tools to “do no harm.” - Share practical lessons learned from using & building open source software for human rights work - Deep dive on secure data sharing - We want to hear about your needs, current solutions, hacks, and concerns about secure, distributed data sharing.

Moderators
avatar for Betsy Bramon

Betsy Bramon

Principal, Kronia Collaborative
Betsy Bramon, is an interdisciplinary social impact consultant. With a multifaceted background as a donor, policy maker, service provider, and advocate, she works with nonprofits, tech-startups, private foundations and community groups to help teams achieve social good, from the inside... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rohini Lakshané

Rohini Lakshané

Director (Emerging Research), The Bachchao Project
https://about.me.rohini
GB

Georgia Bullen

Executive Director, Simply Secure
avatar for Raashi Saxena

Raashi Saxena

Gapminder Foundation, Consultant
Raashi Saxena serves as the Community Partnerships Manager for The Bachchao Project, a non-profit that conducts research and advocacy for gender groups and guides communities in determining appropriate technological interventions for themselves. In 2018, she served as a panelist at... Read More →
avatar for Liz Steininger

Liz Steininger

CEO/Managing Director, Least Authority
Liz Steininger is the CEO/Managing Director of Least Authority in Berlin, a company supporting people’s right to privacy through security consulting and building secure solutions. Prior, she managed financing for Internet freedom projects at the Open Technology Fund. Liz has over... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Biscay (Palais)

5:15pm

If you keep suggesting blockchain, I swear to God I will f—ing scream
Promoting technologies like blockchain as a seemingly simple solution to complex humanitarian and development challenges oversimplifies these issues and celebrates tech as a "silver bullet" solution that will solve everything from poverty to the refugee crisis. This has led to many projects seeking technical solutions first without analyzing the challenges and opportunities, understanding the limits, potential, and threats that come with the technology in question, or including beneficiaries in decision-making. When we make decisions in humanitarian and development projects based on solutions we want to use, instead of user needs, we could be exposing beneficiaries to bigger risks, by leaving them out of decision-making process. Our panel of experts will discuss the following points: *What is technosolutionism and how to avoid it in projects? *How organizations and individuals can deal with technosolutionist demands from funders and partners. *So, what is blockchain and when *should* it be used in projects? *In praise of low-tech or no-tech solutions: How to shift media focus from shiny new toys in tech, to the mundane, consentful, and trusted solutions--and the complexity of the development work, participation, and research necessary that leads to successful and sustainable projects.

Moderators
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Founder & Director, Localization Lab
Dragana Kaurin is a human rights researcher and ethnographer working at the intersection of technology, human rights and migration. She is the founder and executive director of Localization Lab, a non-profit organization that works on technology adoption with local communities, research... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jon Camfield

Jon Camfield

Director, Global Technology Programs, Internews
Tools, training, threats, organizational security, SAFETAG.org, usability and our https://usable.tools project, and more!
avatar for Mallory Knodel

Mallory Knodel

Head of Digital, ARTICLE 19
avatar for Tara Tarakiyee

Tara Tarakiyee

Program Manager, Open Tech Fund
Talk to me about all things censorship circumvention and privacy enhancing technology!
avatar for Neal McCarthy

Neal McCarthy

Sr. Manager, ICT4D Programme, Oxfam
Neal McCarthy leads the ICT4D team at Oxfam America: supporting humanitarian, development and campaign teams in the adoption of technology in the service of program objectives, with the goal of increasing efficiency and amplifying impact. He espouses a rights-based approach to information... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Oya 1 (Laico)

5:15pm

Indian elections, disinformation, and the state of Indian Social Media
This session will explore the issues of hate speech and disinformation during the 2019 Indian Elections. We will discuss the primary actors of disinformation, as well as the tactics and platforms used most heavily in the elections. We will also discuss the themes of disinformation, and the physical violence that resulted from the weaponization of these platforms. The session will feature examples as well as an open dialogue for participants that would like to know more about how these issues have global ramifications.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Cyrene (Laico)

5:15pm

What(went)'sApp at the Brazilian elections?
Since the use of digital communication technologies (particularly social media platforms and mobile apps) are increasingly transforming political processes and influencing in the political debate, this session aims to take the case of the Brazilian electoral process of 2018 in order to critically analyze and hopefully prevent the abuse of economic and political power in elections without jeopardizing FoE or enhancing censorship. By mapping such problems from cases analyzed for ARTICLE19’s publication on the matter (available at desinformacao.artigo19.org, in Portuguese), our goal is to understand new practices of political uses of the Internet and draft best practices and principles for securing FoE within democratic processes.

Speakers
avatar for Alfredo Velazco

Alfredo Velazco

Director, Usuarios Digitales
C

Christen Dobson

Business & Human Rights Resource Centre


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Oya 3 (Laico)

5:15pm

Responsible Investing 101: Investor action on human rights in the digital era
This session will explore the roles and responsibilities of investors in ensuring corporate respect for human rights in the ICT sector with the goal of identifying opportunities for civil society to engage with and mobilize investor leverage to press ICT companies on human rights and maximize collective impact. The session will be framed around the Investor Alliance for Human Rights' (IAHR) campaign to promote respect for human rights in the ICT sector. In particular, we will explore the responsibility of investors to ensure that portfolio companies respect human rights; introduce investor tools and strategies for holding companies accountable for human rights abuses; and identify opportunity for right-holders and civil society to engage with investors on the human rights impacts of ICT companies. Through a discussion of standards, investor strategies, and practical examples of investor-CSO collaboration, including the IAHR's campaign on ICT, the panel comprised of investors and CSOs will highlight the importance of investor-civil society engagement to achieve our shared goals, and explore how the IAHR can be a platform for participants to engage investors in their efforts to promote respect for human rights in the ICT sector.

Moderators
avatar for Paloma Munoz

Paloma Munoz

Director, Investor Alliance for Human Rights
Paloma leads the work of the Investor Alliance for Human Rights (IAHR) - a first of its kind network to coordinate broad based investor action to promote the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

Speakers
MB

Mary Beth Gallagher

Executive Director, Tri-State Coalition for Responsible Investment


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Village Stage (Laico)

5:15pm

Cyber warfare and defense in a tumultuous Middle East
Throughout the Middle East, security concerns do not exist merely in the physical landscape but equally in digital space. The past years have seen the introduction of laws that give the state access to user data in web-based applications, broad and controversial legislation regulating behavior on social or other online media, and the aggressive use of technology to target political dissidents or those who do not conform to state norms (like LGBTQ individuals). These efforts are carried out most often in the name of protecting national security, referencing the proliferation of threat actors that seek to mobilize digital space for their violent ends. How do different governments both in the Middle East and around the world, use data? What are the ethical and legal obligations of these governments as well as other actors (technology companies, social media companies, citizens etc.)? How do states utilize user data in repressive ways? What impact does this have on citizens' security, and in what ways can citizens protect their data?

Moderators
AM

Allison McManus

Research Director, Tahrir Institute Middle East Policy

Speakers

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Dougga (Laico)

5:15pm

Tiplines Today
Realizing that sources may need more secure methods of contacting journalists than "the plain old telephone", modern media organizations worldwide have begun to look towards consumer-facing mobile apps (Signal, WhatsApp, Telegram, etc.) to create tiplines that can boast communications with increased confidentiality. While this switch is a welcome improvement in maintaining source protection, it also comes with a new set of technical, logistical, and legal challenges. This session will address how major news orgs structure their tiplines; grapple with vulnerabilities while maximizing various security features; and craft proactive responses to legal, operational, and technical disasters. Participants are encouraged to bring their computers, as we will try some of the discussed techniques.

Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Elydhafa (Laico)

5:15pm

Combating Fake News: Exploring approaches for protecting the messenger and the message
The new “fake news” rhetoric is providing a dangerous framework for repression. CPJ has seen “fake news” used globally to justify attacks, harassment, and arrests of journalists. In order to frame the scope of the discussion, the session will share relevant research into where fake news legislation is in place, has been proposed, or in rare cases, been revoked and its impact on journalists and civil society. After a brief overview of existing research and its findings, participants will break into three groups for each of the categories to discuss potential action or approaches that could be helpful to repeal or prevent fake news laws, and to try to understand what led to their revocation in rare cases. How does “fake news” legislation manifest similarly or differently around the globe, and what can be learned? A rapporteur for each group will take notes and will report back to the entire group at the end of the session to share findings. CPJ will collect the findings and put together a lessons-learned and advocacy strategy based upon the discussion to share with participants. The takeaways from this discussion will inform CPJ’s and other organizations’ advocacy with both tech platforms and with newsrooms.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jessica Dheere

Jessica Dheere

Founder/Executive Director, SMEX
I'm the co-founder and executive director of the Beirut, Lebanon–based SMEX (smex.org), the Middle East and North Africa’s leading digital rights research and policy advocacy organization. I'm also a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and the Carr Center... Read More →
GL

Gabrielle Lim

Researcher, Data & Society Research Institute


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Caspian (Palais)

5:15pm

Media Loves Tech - Digital solutions for viable journalism in Tunisia
How can journalists and the start-up scene work together for a better journalism? This session aims to show digital solutions for viable journalism. DW Akademie, Germany's leading organization for media development, in cooperation with the Tunisian NGO, that promotes investigative journalism in Tunisia, Al Khatt will present the project MEDIA LOVES TECH. The open innovation challenge was firstly organized in 2018 to improve journalism by digital innovation and fostering an entrepreneurial mindset in media. The audience will be inspired by a show pitch and a panel discussion and will then be invited to share thoughts about the topics in question. MEDIA LOVES TECH goes RightsCon - building new communities for innovation in journalism. It will underline how digital innovation is hitting journalism in Tunisia. How new digital tools for journalism are pushing the media to innovation and giving their part to more transparency, higher quality standards, more participation, and a better citizen journalism. More information at medialovestech.com

Moderators
avatar for Ranjan Roy

Ranjan Roy

Founder, The Edge Group

Speakers
avatar for Vera Möller-Holtkamp

Vera Möller-Holtkamp

Vera Möller-Holtkamp is a journalist and a project manager for DW Akademie, implementing media development projects in North Africa.She looks back to 15 years of experience in journalism and media development – having worked as a journalist, journalistic trainer oder project manager... Read More →
avatar for Bilal Randeree

Bilal Randeree

Africa/MENA Director, Media Development Investment Fund
avatar for Bechir Nemlaghi

Bechir Nemlaghi

Hexastack
avatar for FRAJ Louhichi

FRAJ Louhichi

founder, RAKIB


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Adean (Palais)

5:15pm

Catalyzing Sustainable Development: Youth, peace, security and ICTs
Whether it is championing gun reforms, ending violence against women, advocating for gender and sexual diversities, leading initiatives to tackle climate, promoting healthy relationships and individual wellbeing, or playing a key role in peace processes, youth leaders and the work they are doing are being recognized by media and key decision makers. Youth are able to leverage technological innovation in order to spread awareness, mobilize people to action, and organize and implement their initiatives. However, while technology can serve as a useful tool to allow youth to exercise their agency, it is insufficient in realizing social innovation and change. Emerging technologies not only have the potential but are already being used to suppress and surveil young people, posing a threat to their security and rights. The lack of reliable access to these technologies also presents a challenge to young people, as technological literacy becomes increasingly important in a globalized world. Young people are not meaningfully engaged in the governance of technologies. Participants will engage in a design session to identify and co-create solutions for the challenges identified during the workshop. These solutions will be translated into concrete actions that each participant will be responsible for implementing over the next year.

Moderators
avatar for Bushra Ebadi

Bushra Ebadi

Global Security & Politics Research Associate, The Centre for International Governance Innovation
Bushra Ebadi is a social innovator focused on designing sustainable, innovative solutions to complex global challenges using her multidisciplinary background and skills in design and systems thinking, policy analysis and mixed methods research. She has co-created refugee housing and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nadia Owusu

Nadia Owusu

Projects and Communications Lead, STA Africa
Nadia Owusu is a Ghanaian digital marketer and a digital skills trainer. She founded STA Africa, which helps young African artists and enthusiasts to develop their creative abilities and potentials using digital tools and new media. Through her skills training efforts, she has empowered... Read More →
avatar for Justin Wiebe

Justin Wiebe

Program Manager, Mastercard Foundation
Justin Wiebe is Michif (Métis) from Saskatoon in Treaty 6 and Métis Territory, and currently lives in Toronto in territories covered by the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant. Justin is passionate about inclusive city-building that centers reconciliation, youth leadership... Read More →
avatar for Mariel García-Montes

Mariel García-Montes

Research Assistant, MIT Comparative Media Studies
Let's talk about privacy, youth, digital security, participatory research, media campaigns, Latin America. I'm both a practitioner and an academic researcher.I will soon graduate from Comparative Media Studies program. I am a research assistant at the Center for Civic Media at the... Read More →
avatar for Mohammad Asadi-Lari

Mohammad Asadi-Lari

MD/PhD Candidate @ University of Toronto, Youth Advisor @ Canadian Commission for UNESCO
I’m Co-Founder of STEM Fellowship and an MD/PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. I’ve spent part of the past 23 years moving around the world: being born in Iran, spending around 7 years of my childhood in the UK, my teenage years back in Tehran, and finally settling in... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Hannibal (Laico)

5:15pm

Climate change under construction: an environmentally sustainable Internet
An environmentally sustainable Internet is past due. In recent decades we've seen fulfilled civil society predictions that capitalist innovations and ICTs have not automatically solved critical environmental issues such as climate change. In fact, we've seen the opposite. The expansion of the Internet has spurred the production, consumption and disposal of computers, mobile phones, networking devices, energy, that are having adverse effects on the earth’s natural resources and on humanity. Sustainability relates to environmental and social (formal and informal workers involved) implications of the materials and energy involved in digital devices involved in the whole internet (end-user, server, network devices, cables, radiation). Our session looks at issues and solutions at the intersection of technology and policy issues in environmental and labor justice. We will share, highlight, coordinate, find ways to scale up, the best practices of electronics producers and consumers, policy makers and development organizations who are doing something about them to achieve lasting environmental and social justice about and through technology and circular economy processes. We intend to coordinate a global vision, mission, objectives, strategies and actions at the local, regional and global level, before climate change destroys our society, planet and its Internet.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Alice Walker-Mitchell

Alice Walker-Mitchell

Marketing Officer, Computer Aid International
Computer Aid is working towards a world where everyone has equal access to ICT. We aim to achieve this by offering secure IT disposal for organisations who want to donate equipment, subsidising computers for non-profits worldwide, and running educational projects to improve ICT e... Read More →
avatar for Pavel Antonov

Pavel Antonov

Co-founder/Executive Editor, BlueLink
Journalist, social researcher, journalism trainer, based in Budapest, Hungary. Co-founder/Executive Editor of BlueLink - the civic action and support e-network for Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). Affiliated member of the OpenSpace Research Centre at the Open University in Milton... Read More →
avatar for Rozália Klára Bakó

Rozália Klára Bakó

Associate Professor, Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania
Volunteers as trainer and research consultant at StrawberryNet Foundation: digital literacy, debate, and conflict resolution.
avatar for Alexandra Lutz

Alexandra Lutz

Co-Founder, TerraTech
Alexandra is the Co-Founder of TerraTech, an advocacy project aimed at establishing a consciousness and sparking action among public and private decision-makers in the field of emerging technologies. The exponential growth of technologies in our everyday live has a huge impact in... Read More →
avatar for Leandro Navarro

Leandro Navarro

Researcher and activist, UPC, eReuse
Researcher in Distributed Systems and Computer Networks at UPC.EDU. Currently active in research and activism in community networks, community clouds, circular economy digital devices: reuse, human and environmental rights (eReuse.org). Council and executive board member of APC.org... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Oya 2 (Laico)

5:15pm

Digital Cooperation, Solved? Assessing the UN High Level Panel
This session will (a) shine a light on possible means of fostering cooperation between stakeholders regarding the panel's work after the report is out and (b) strengthen awareness and networking around the upcoming changes to the IGF suggested by the High-Level Panel. The panel report will also include recommendations with the aim of strengthening cross-country cooperation in digital technology and the new proposed models for digital cooperation will be the issue area addressed in this session.

Moderators
Wednesday June 12, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Utique (Laico)

6:45pm

RightsCon Movie Night
BLAXITES: 
Blaxites is a film that follows the story of a young woman whose celebratory social media post affects her access to vital medication. Her attempts to circumvent the system leads to even more dire consequences. In Blaxites, we highlight issues that arise when different data systems are connected.

HALF A LIFE: 
In ancient Yoruba folk tales, there is particular wonder around "Ado Ato" — containers of magical spells. Like this container, our studio encapsulates magic by bringing innovative content to the screen. Following an ambition to produce the unexpected, our team approaches creation with a pioneering spirit, always pushing to compose the most diverse and engaging storytelling geared to audiences who crave fresh, boundary-pushing, and meaningful experiences.

Our award-winning work has been seen from Annecy and Sheffield DocFest to Frameline and The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Through our global network of directors and creators, we produce and deliver authentic, daring, and impactful projects with a broad reach. As a hybrid production company and collective, we create our own projects, serve clients around the world, and provide consulting services.

Speakers
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

RightsCon Director
Carolina Rossini is a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader and currently serves as the RightsCon Director at Access Now. She has worked for Facebook, Telefonica, Public Knowledge, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, and Fundação... Read More →
avatar for Mighty Casey

Mighty Casey

the Mighty Mouth, Mighty Casey Media LLC
I blend my background in network news and standup comedy to inform my health policy and data rights activist work. I write, I speak, I facilitate the Festivus Airing of Grievances in healthcare and health data rights. My favorite people to work with are those who want to fix the system... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2019 6:45pm - 8:15pm
Oya 1 (Laico)

9:00pm

 
Thursday, June 13
 

7:30am

Yoga
Join us for a morning yoga session outside the Laico Hotel's pool deck to center yourself before a busy day at RightsCon!

Thursday June 13, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Laico Pool Deck

9:00am

Delegated Repression: How do the Russian state forces private actors to censor and to surveil?
One of the most pressing issues arising in the discussion of Internet regulation is the role and responsibility of private companies, as well as the delegation of police and propaganda functions to non-state actors (Internet service providers, national IT-companies, pro-government activists and paid commentators). In recent years, the Russian authorities have taken a number of important steps towards seriously restricting Internet freedom and the right to privacy, seeking to promote the approaches they support at the international level, exerting pressure on global platforms and promoting digital sovereignty. Together with prominent experts from Russia and Ukraine we shall talk about the role of quasi-state actors in the control of the Internet, as well as how do authoritatian regimes force Internet companies to block and filter information, to suspend accounts and to give out personal data as well as how ISPs can protect their users.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Bulat Mukhamedzhanov

Bulat Mukhamedzhanov

Lawyer, Agora International Human Rights Group
Bulat Mukhamedzhanov graduated from the Faculty of Philology (Kazan State University, Russia) in 2007 and since then became a human rights activist. In 2017 he graduated from the university with a law degree.Mukhamedzhanov started his career as a press-secretary of local human rights... Read More →
avatar for Iryna Chulivska

Iryna Chulivska

Digital Security Lab Ukraine


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Oya 1 (Laico)

9:00am

Do Moderators Dream of Electric Sheep? The potential for AI in regulating online content
Online platforms are increasingly facing calls from lawmakers and regulators to address harmful content of various types, and also frequently wish to moderate their own content for their own terms of use and policies. The scale of the content on many platforms makes some form of algorithmic function a necessary part of content moderation, and recently interest has grown in using AI technologies such as machine learning to play a part too. The goal of this session is to exchange views between expert panelists, and the public, on the potential for AI to be used in content moderation, while respecting fundamental rights.

Moderators
avatar for Richard Wingfield

Richard Wingfield

Head of Legal, Global Partners Digital

Speakers
avatar for Jake Lucchi

Jake Lucchi

Head of AI and Data Value, Google Asia Pacific
AI, data, content
avatar for Oli Bird

Oli Bird

Head of International Internet Policy, Ofcom
Oli leads on international internet issues for Ofcom, the UK's communications regulator.
avatar for Charlotte Slaiman

Charlotte Slaiman

Competition Policy Counsel, Public Knowledge
Charlotte is Policy Counsel for competition policy at Public Knowledge, where she focuses on digital platforms. Prior to joining Public Knowledge, Charlotte worked in the Anticompetitive Practices Division of the Federal Trade Commission, investigating and litigating antitrust conduct... Read More →
avatar for Sally Epstein

Sally Epstein

Sally Epstein is a Senior Machine Learning Engineer for Cambridge Consultants, where she drives core R&D into state-of-the-art AI. Based at the company’s Digital Greenhouse AI research lab, Sally is focused on developing novel approaches to deep learning and working with major clients... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
L'Escale (Laico)

9:00am

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: Keeping public sector algorithms accountable
A few governments have begun testing tools to increase transparency and accountability of algorithms used by the public sector. This session will share examples of a few pioneering teams in governments, such as the French government’s taskforce for open data and data policy, Etalab, who are testing this in the fields of education, taxation, employment and social policy as well as the Canadian government’s efforts towards this. The session will also explore key principles that underlie these tools, and how these can be adapted across other contexts. It will be an opportunity to discuss the good practice and challenges around developing norms related to public sector algorithmic accountability and where, if at all, this differs (in principle or in practice) with private sector algorithms.

Finally, it will share how governments, including the Government of France, are using multistakeholder platforms like Open Government Partnership to undertake these efforts in partnership with civil society and experts, and how a growing numbers of countries in OGP are undertaking policy reforms on this, paving the way to global norms.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Simon Chignard

Simon Chignard

Senior policy advisor, Etalab (French PM task force for open data & open gov)
avatar for Soizic Penicaud

Soizic Penicaud

Open Innovation Officer, Etalab


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 1 (Laico)

9:00am

Feeding Trolls in the Marketplace of Ideas
We will offer knowledge from specific efforts to respond to hatred online, and then facilitate a brainstorm among all attendees. First, Dr. Cathy Buerger will describe a handful of key anti-hatred efforts from around the world, based on more than a year of research and interviews with their leaders. Two founders of anti-hatred efforts will then speak about their own active and influential projects.

Mina Dennert, an Iranian-born Swedish journalist, was deeply dispirited by the surge of hatred online in Sweden that followed the arrival of many refugees to Europe in 2015. She founded a group to respond to hatred collectively, wrote a set of rules strictly governing the tone of the group’s posts, and called it Jagärhär, or ”I am here.” The idea went viral, attracting 75,000 members, and Jagärhär has since been replicated in 13 other countries.

Logan Smith founded the popular Twitter account @YesYoureRacist in 2012, which has grown from a lighthearted way to poke fun at people who say “I’m not racist but…” to a major online presence in today’s fight against hate speech. In 2017, Logan was instrumental in identifying several of the white supremacists who rioted in Charlottesville, Virginia. By day, he is the communications director for Progress NC Action, a progressive nonprofit in Raleigh, North Carolina.

After these brief and provocative talks, the moderator will invite the entire group to offer specific ideas from their own responses to hatred online - or those they have witnessed. Finally we will invite ideas for future projects and collaborations.

Moderators
avatar for Tonei Glavinic

Tonei Glavinic

Director of Operations, Dangerous Speech Project
Tonei Glavinic (they/them) is an educator, activist, and nonprofit management expert based in Barcelona, Spain. In addition to working with the Dangerous Speech Project since 2011, Tonei also supports and facilitates educational programs for Northwestern University's Civic Education... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Buerger

Catherine Buerger

Senior Researcher, Dangerous Speech Project
I am a Senior Researcher at the Dangerous Speech Project in Washington, DC. Trained as an anthropologist, my work focuses on civil society and human rights responses to harmful speech.
avatar for Mina Dennert

Mina Dennert

Founder, The #iamhere network
Mina Dennert is a Swedish writer, journalist, and the founder of the #iamhere network, which has inspired over a hundred thousand people from all over the world to stand up and work for a democratic and inclusive society. Through the Facebook groups of the same name, members counteract... Read More →
avatar for Logan Smith

Logan Smith

Communications Director, Progress North Carolina
Logan Smith runs the popular Twitter account @YesYoureRacist, which has grown from a lighthearted way to poke fun at people who say “I’m not racist but…” when it was created in 2012, to a major online presence in today’s fight against hate speech. In 2017, Logan was instrumental... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Biscay (Palais)

9:00am

Lightning Talks: What's in a name? Tracking terror and digital threats
MRAs, Incels and More: Should They Be Included Under Violent Extremists? (Breakthrough Trust)

Description: This session will be talking about gender based violence on the internet and the impact it can have offline. It ties in with the current debate around violent extremism and why, though there is a lot of literature around violent extremists in cases of religion or racial politics, there is surprisingly little in terms of gender. This is despite the fact that gender actually plays a very crucial role in many cases of violent extremism and by ignoring it, we miss the gendered nuances of violence. This is despite the fact that the in the last few years, there has been a recognition of figures and communities online which actively propagate violence against women as a ideology and yet face little consequences for it. Examples can range from people like Roosh V, Eliot Rodgers (the man behind the Isle Vista killings) and to the everyday average troll. With our experience working in India, we will also be referring to the Indian specific context to this issue. Attendees can expect an open minded discussion on this topic and a push towards greater sensitivity and understanding of gender based violence on the internet.

Speaker: Saswati Chatterjee

The use of biometric data to identify terrorists: best practice or risky business? (University of Minnesota)

Description: Developing and implementing tools aimed at reliably identifying terrorist groups and individual terrorists has long been one of the cornerstones of counter-terrorism action. Collection and exchange of information related to the movement of such persons has increasingly been prioritized with the rise of the ‘foreign fighters’ phenomenon, in particular as a response to the perceived change in the international risk environment linked to having such foreign fighters, formerly affiliated with ISIL, its satellites and other groups, return to their countries of origin or travel to other conflict zones.

To address relevant challenges, the Security Council adopted resolution 2396 requiring, among others, that States “develop and implement systems to collect biometric data […] in order to responsibly and properly identify terrorists, including foreign terrorist fighters”. This session will explore implications of the obligation to use biometric technologies and data as a counter-terrorism measure by 1) addressing the ramifications of the legislative action by the Council from the point of view of global governance and the rule of law, and 2) outline relevant human rights concerns with particular emphasis of the impact of over-broad definitions of terrorism and related offenses in this regard; and challenges linked to data-sharing, including across borders.

Speaker: Krisztina Huszti-Orban

How a nationwide phishing campaign in Venezuela continues to put dissidents at risk (Venezuela Inteligente)

A portal associated with the Venezuelan opposition led by Juan Guaidó, was created to register volunteers interested in helping with the distribution of humanitarian aid. It has become a target of a phishing campaign led by those aligned with the Nicolás Maduro government.

We detected that CANTV, the largest internet service provider in Venezuela owned by the government of Nicolás Maduro, was redirecting users visiting the website to another server hosting a visually identical malicious website which is not owned or controlled by the legitimate site administrators of voluntariosxvenezuela.com. we estimate that tens of thousands of people submitted their data to the malicious cloned website.

We were able to verify that the redirection to the malicious website happened even when using DNS servers that were not CANTV servers (like, when using Google’s 8.8.8.8) using DNS response injection. Our research also directly attributed the campaign to two government institutions. In addition, our research also discovered multiple domains that are similar to social media sites and popular websites that could be used in future phishing campaigns (or have been used already) to collect user data.

The personal data collected used to fuel further victimization by publishing personal details and using them to fuel fake news.These developments are worrying because they point to an increased sophistication in digital attacks linked to and originating from the government of Nicolás Maduro. This dramatically increases the need for both users and website administrators to take preventative measures to avoid falling into this type or similar phishing campaigns.

SpeakerAndrés E. Azpúrua

Speakers
avatar for Krisztina Huszti-Orban

Krisztina Huszti-Orban

Research fellow/ Senior Legal Advisor to the UN Special Rapporteur on Counter-terrorism and Human Rights, University of Minnesota
Krisztina is a research fellow and lecturer in law at the Human Rights Center of the University of Minnesota. She also serves as senior legal advisor to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
The BeeHive (Palais)

9:00am

Returning Protest to the People: A campaign to destigmatise protesters
Historically, protests have often inspired positive social change, improved protection of human rights, and continue to help define and protect civic space in all parts of the world. They enable individuals and groups to express dissent and grievances, to share views and opinions, to expose flaws in governance and to publicly demand that the authorities and other powerful entities rectify problems and are accountable for their actions. The current political climate in Kenya and Brazil gives rise to fragility and limited guarantees to human rights. The purpose of this session is to build awareness and stimulate discussion around the negative perceptions on protest. This session is a great opportunity to showcase credible research conducted in Kenya and Brazil and mark the importance of coalition campaigns to change attitudes and behaviours in support of protests. We will use this opportunity to actively engage participants in the discussion, provide lessons learned and hear from others how to devise strategies to expand campaigns in other countries where the right to protest is not protected. Based on our experience, we will invite participants to explore this market research approach to advocacy in other regions of the world and on other topical issues.


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Village Stage (Laico)

9:00am

A multi-stakeholder dialogue on internet platforms, sexual content, and child protection
Since the anti sex-trafficking law FOSTA was passed, Internet platforms have been forced to implement increasingly draconian restrictions on sexual speech, in an effort both to comply with the law, and to appear tough against sexual abusers. But this can actually make child sexual abuse prevention harder, by restricting the flow of information to children and caregivers alike as well as by conflating child sexual exploitation material with legitimate speech. This event follows on from an event held in San Francisco in May, aimed at providing platforms with strategies to remove more material that is harmful to children and has no protected expressive value, and less material such as lawful, accurate information on child sexual abuse prevention. This session builds on the earlier event by proposing concrete recommendations on reconciling child protection with freedom of sexual speech. Participants should expect to contribute to a facilitated roundtable discussion between experts and stakeholders who are are normally excluded from the development of child protection policies. Our objective is to enable industry participants to ensure that their child protection policies and practices are scientifically sound, and that they fulfill their obligations under the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

Moderators
avatar for Jeremy Malcolm

Jeremy Malcolm

Executive Director, Prostasia Foundation
Jeremy Malcolm is Executive Director of Prostasia Foundation, a child protection nonprofit. Prior to that he was Senior Global Policy Analyst at Electronic Frontier Foundation, where he worked on the international dimensions of issues such as intellectual property, intermediary liability... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mariel García Montes.

Mariel García Montes.

Mariel García Montes is a public interest technology capacity builder and researcher from Mexico. Her main topics of interest are privacy and information security, social exclusions in technology and participatory processes.Most recently, Mariel was a graduate student at the Comparative... Read More →
avatar for Jac sm Kee

Jac sm Kee

Women's Rights Programme Manager, APC, APC (Association for Progressive Communications)
Gender, Sexuality, Access, Internet Governance, Ending online gender-based violence, Sexual surveillance and big data, Freedom of expression & gendered hate speech
avatar for heather barr

heather barr

acting co-director, women's rights, Human Rights Watch
Starting work on a project on online abuses against women in South Korea--would be very grateful for advice and contacts!


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Utique (Laico)

9:00am

Technology in Conflict: Assessing platform companies’ human rights responsibility and accountability in high-risk settings
There are increasing calls for the tech industry to embrace a rights-centered approach to engagements, especially in high-risk settings. But stakeholders across sectors continue to wrestle with what exactly this means in practical terms. And platform companies in particular are grappling with their relationships to human rights and ethical standards. During this strategic roundtable, participants will collaboratively and candidly talk-through the following discussion questions, based on current real-world situations where these problems are especially acute: What responsibility do companies have for third party content shared or developed on their platforms and the impacts or harms the content may enable? As AI developers create new technology, what expectations will be placed on developers to understand how their customers plan to use the technology? What responsibility do platform companies have to prevent, mitigate or remediate human rights harms for which it is not possible to demonstrate causation or contribution? What would that responsibility look like? Can we align the interests of relevant stakeholders (public and private) to agree on a set of guidelines for platform companies introducing their products in high-risk settings? Participants’ views and experiences will help inform a publication of recommendations for platform companies introducing their technology in high-risk settings.

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Easterday

Jennifer Easterday

Co-Founder & Executive Director, JustPeace Labs
I am an attorney with expertise in human rights law, international criminal law and peacebuilding. My work with NGOs and international tribunals focuses on strengthening responses to armed conflict and mass human rights abuses in Africa, Latin America and Europe. I promote ethical... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Steve Crown

Steve Crown

Deputy General Counsel, Human Rights, Microsoft
UNGPs. HRIAs. Artificial Intelligence and Human Rights.
avatar for Hibah Kamal-Grayson

Hibah Kamal-Grayson

Public Policy Manager, Human Rights and Internet Governance, Google
avatar for David Sullivan

David Sullivan

Learning & Development Director, Global Network Initiative
avatar for Helena Puig Larrauri

Helena Puig Larrauri

Director, Build Up
Helena is a governance and development professional with over a decade of experience advising and supporting UN agencies, multi-lateral organisations and NGOs working in conflict contexts and polarized environments. She specializes in the integration of digital technology and innovation... Read More →
avatar for Chloe Poynton

Chloe Poynton

Principal, Article One
Chloe is a Principal at Article One, a business & human rights consulting firm that works with companies, institutions, and state agencies to develop and implement strategies to promote corporate respect for human rights.


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
El Jem (Laico)

9:00am

Hope for Resilience: Shifting the narrative, advancing wellbeing
How can we solve the burnout and PTSD problem in (online and offline) human rights activist circles? Recent research suggests that individual beliefs, organizational practices, and a human rights culture that values “martyrs,” reinforces a “savior” mentality, and stigmatizes mental health leads to negative outcomes for advocates (Satterthwaite et al., 2019; Nah 2018). The goal of this session is to identify and map the underlying problems that foster these beliefs/culture, and to advance possible solutions together with participants. The workshop leaders will suggest that one solution lies in fundamentally reframing the work of human rights--from a narrative focused on “saviors” and “victims” to one based on true solidarity and honest connection. This new narrative is steeped in hope and opens new ways of measuring our successes beyond old metrics of outputs and impact. This reframing allows human rights advocates to identify more effective models of collaboration that center--and honestly examine--power in our collaborative relationships, as well as encouraging us to speak openly about our mental health and wellbeing. We will ask: can tech help us in this new quest? What gives us hope and connects us to the reasons we became human rights activists in the first place?

Moderators
avatar for Margaret Satterthwaite

Margaret Satterthwaite

Director, Bernstein Institute for Human Rights & Global Justice Clinic

Speakers
JD

Jelena Dordevic

Co-founder, Feminist Self-Care Collective
avatar for Katie Wightman

Katie Wightman

Fellow, Global Justice Clinic


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 3 (Laico)

9:00am

Creative Ways to Support Diverse Tool Teams
Many of the most commonly used privacy and security tools are created and maintained by notoriously small, homogeneous, and primarily Western individuals/teams. Some are unable to officially register or cannot receive funding due to other professional commitments. Others are unable to accept U.S. government funding. These limitations, among others, make it difficult for tool teams to diversify and sustain themselves long-term. During this session, tool teams will gather with donors and discuss current limitations and explore creative solutions to address their needs. The meetup will be lead by Internews’ Global Technology team, which has many years’ experience working with open source tool teams. Over the years, the team has developed innovative ways to provide support to non-traditional tool teams that do not have the organizational or team structure to absorb funding. Other attendees at this session will include open source tool team representatives that have previously received support despite limitations, or others that have been unable to receive support previously given their constraints. Additionally, organizations providing support (financial or otherwise) to tool teams will be invited to share their experiences and any creative solutions they have used in non-traditional situations.

Moderators
Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Hannibal (Laico)

9:00am

Granny & the Robots: Sex, violence and care - Why human rights matter
Please join us for a special talk with the United Nations Independent Expert on the rights of older persons on her work on robots and assistive technology. In the context of ageing societies, lack of health professionals and economic constraints, the use of assistive devices and robotics is increasingly seen as a cost-effective solution to make health care systems sustainable. The United Nations Independent Expert on the rights of older persons examined how these technologies and robots impact older persons’ life and the enjoyment of their rights. Assistive technologies were first designed to perform simple, routine tasks to allow human staff to dedicate more time to complex tasks. Robots are now taking on more and more medical and caregiving tasks. This inevitably affects the enjoyment by older persons of their human rights, including their dignity and autonomy, informational self-determination and non-discrimination and equality. The UN expert stresses the need for a human rights-based approach to underpin discussions in that field and make sure we will adequately address current and future challenges and ensure sufficient protection of older people’s rights.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Hicks

Peggy Hicks

Director. Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
Since January 2016, Peggy Hicks has served as director of the Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division at the UN's human rights office. From 2005 to 2015, she was global advocacy director at Human Rights Watch, where she was responsible for coordinating... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Jelsa (Laico)

9:00am

One Size Fits All? Taking global human rights apps to scale for use in wildly different local contexts
This session will provide an interactive platform for speakers and audience participants to grapple with the inherent tensions of creating human rights apps that are intended to be universal in reach while also usable and feasible invery different local contexts, legal jurisdictions, and security considerations. The discussion will address experiences and lessons learned in taking apps to market and to scale. Responsible design and development of an app, requires us to consider how the app will be used on the ground, information flows, security considerations, and meaningful collaboration with end-users. These steps may be feasible at the pilot stage in a limited number of locations, but this session will examine how feasible it is to engage in local, end-user participation when taking an app to scale in a global market with thousands or even millions of end-users. This discussion will ask the panelists and audience: What does responsible, ethical scale up look like? What does end-user collaboration look like? What are the opportunities, challenges, and risks in creating bespoke tools that are intended to be used globally? What tech, financial and human resources are required to scale up? This session will encourage and engage participants to articulate a way forward.

Moderators
avatar for Betsy Bramon

Betsy Bramon

Principal, Kronia Collaborative
Betsy Bramon, is an interdisciplinary social impact consultant. With a multifaceted background as a donor, policy maker, service provider, and advocate, she works with nonprofits, tech-startups, private foundations and community groups to help teams achieve social good, from the inside... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Betts

Wendy Betts

Project Director, eyeWitness to Atrocities
Wendy Betts is the Director of eyeWitness to Atrocities, an organisation that combines law and technology to promote accountability for serious international crimes. The eyeWitness system allows human rights documenters to capture photos/videos of human rights violations that can... Read More →
avatar for Zara Rahman

Zara Rahman

Deputy Director, The Engine Room
Zara is the Deputy Director of The Engine Room, a non-profit organisation supporting civil society to advance their missions via strategic, effective and responsible use of data and technology.


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Elydhafa (Laico)

9:00am

The Feminist Digisec Network and the Importance of a Feminist Digital Security
The increasing risk presented to women in positions of social and political vulnerability, strongly illustrated by the public execution of Marielle Franco, exposed the urge for more supportive networks of women trainers on digital and integral security. In this intricate scenario in which individual freedom and human rights are threatened for women in a very global context, it's utterly necessary building affective networks and infrastructures - both physical and digital - towards a reimagined digital security culture based on transfeminist perspectives of collective care. Joining members from several experienced organizations and feminist infrastructures, the Feminist Digisec Network share their experiences towards building approaches for digital security training focused on sensible, nurturing and easy to understand methodologies to engage non-technical women and LGBTQIA+ human rights defenders and frontline activits on employing the current technological toolset for digital self-defense and methodologies for context analysis, holistic security, threat and risk model assessment and self-care techniques, bringing some cases and experiences from our activities. Women digital trainers from all the world are invited to join on a critical discussion over constructing narratives based on decolonial and feminist internet principles for a new culture of digital security and online self-preservation.

Moderators
avatar for Bruna Zanolli

Bruna Zanolli

Host Org Artigo 19 Brasil, Mozilla fellow
I'm a self-taught popular interest technologist in the area of ​​autonomous communications and infrastrutures with experience in deployment and maintenance of community networks, especially using LPFM radios and Wifi. I use principles of popular education and intersectional feminism... Read More →

Speakers

Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Carthage 2 (Laico)

9:00am

Developing a Digital Rights Model Law for Africa
Participants in this session will have the opportunity to share and learn the tools, skills and collaborations necessary for making digital rights policy with a region-specific approach. In finer details, researchers, policy activists, academia, corporate bodies and state representatives will have a chance to develop a multi-stakeholder policy intervention document states can approach for rights-respecting technologies. Beyond many states' approach to digital rights legislation and guidelines, this session will provide an opportunity to emboss human rights on tech policy conversations in the digital age from the region to the interested countries.

Moderators
TI

Tomiwa Ilori

Researcher, Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria
I'm keen on conversations that link international human rights law on ICTs and emerging tech to national human rights policies and also interested in how digital technologies impact human rights and democratic development in Africa and across the globe.

Speakers
avatar for Adeboye Adegoke

Adeboye Adegoke

Program Manager, Paradigm Initiative
I work at the Intersection of technology, innovations and human right as well as the Implications for the digital economy. I work around the subject of privacy, freedom of expression and other human rights online. I monitor Internet/technology related policies in Nigeria and across... Read More →
avatar for Hlengiwe Dube

Hlengiwe Dube

Centre for Human Rights
avatar for Ndiaga Gueye

Ndiaga Gueye

President, Senegal ICT Users Association (ASUTIC)
Digital rights defender and web and mobile applications developerI have a Master in computer sciences and a Master in digital projects management.I wrote a book about digital projects management (in French). (https://www.morebooks.de/store/fr/book/1/isbn/978-3-639-54136-6)Currently... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Amilcar (Laico)

9:00am

Law Enforcement and the Internet of Things
In the past few years reporting about law enforcement seeking smart home device recordings and fitness device data have captured the public’s attention. It became more apparent through these stories that while “Internet of Things” devices may introduce new conveniences, they also produce more granular records about our day to day activities. And these records be of interest to the government. This panel will explore some of the privacy concerns attendant to law enforcement access to IOT data, how this data can aid law enforcement investigations and the efforts by law enforcement to ensure such access, and some of the predicted issues the introduction of IOT data as evidence in court will raise.

Moderators
avatar for Mana Azarmi

Mana Azarmi

Policy Counsel, Center for Democracy & Technology
I'm on the Security & Surveillance team, formally titled the Freedom, Security & Technology Project. I work on government electronic surveillance.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Lynch

Jennifer Lynch

Surveillance Litigation Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Jennifer Lynch is a senior lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and works on privacy and civil liberties issues. She challenges government surveillance technologies like location tracking, face recognition, and DNA collection through the courts and works to promote privacy-protective... Read More →
avatar for Ilia Siatitsa

Ilia Siatitsa

Legal Officer, Privacy International
Talk to me about the right to privacy and beyond - focusing on human rights issues arising at the intersection of privacy and technology, interested in surveillance and data exploitation by governments and corporations.Find more at https://privacyinternational.org/people/3004/dr... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Drewer

Daniel Drewer

Data Protection Officer, Europol


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Cyrene (Laico)

9:00am

Decolonising Cyberpolicy: Developing a Cyberpolicy Framework Relevant to the Global South
Internet adoption rates in the Global South have expanded significantly, resulting in unprecedented obstacles for national policymakers and regulators in developing effective policies that promote and protect digital rights while enabling digital innovation. Policymakers in the Global South face unique challenges in enabling a dynamic cyberpolicy environment and to create the capacity to respond with appropriate regulations that enforce legislation, protect users and promote effective adoption and innovation. Thus, a key challenge in the Global South regarding cyberpolicy is creating an inclusive digital society that fosters human rights, network openness, cybersecurity and promotes economic growth. The proposed workshop will enable an interactive discussion on national, regional and global approaches to cyberpolicy development while focusing on priorities of the Global South. Each of the participating panelists, invited from regional cyberpolicy centres based in Africa, Asia and Latin America respectively, will share their experiences of developing regionally-relevant research agendas that respond to cyberpolicy challenges that are globally relevant. Thereafter, a selection of stakeholders from various sectors will discuss the interactions between Global North and Global South cyberpolicy challenges and how to improve collaboration to bolster human rights-based policymaking within a global context.

Moderators
Speakers
JM

Judith Mariscal

CIDE
Centro de Investgacion y Docencia Economica
avatar for Isaac Rutenberg

Isaac Rutenberg

Director, Strathmore University


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Limes (Laico)

9:00am

How Do You Trust the Internet? Insights into users' perceptions of security and privacy, what they mean for the Internet, and how we all can help improve trust online.
During this fireside chat, we will highlight the results from the CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust, with a specific focus on Tunisian respondents. Looking back at the trends over five years of surveys, the speakers will discuss how user perceptions of security and privacy continue to shape Internet policy and, in turn, how Internet policy has shaped user perceptions. The CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust provides a unique set of snapshots on user perceptions of the Internet and how their interactions with the Internet have changed over time. The survey, conducted by Ipsos on behalf of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), in partnership with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the Internet Society (ISOC), is carried out in 25 economies with responses from nearly 25,000 Internet users each year. Using this data as a foundation, this session aims to spark an open discussion among attendees and the speakers, identifying discrete areas for future collaboration to improve trust online. Should we be content with the average user's perception of security, privacy, and the Internet? And if not, how can we change things for the better?

Moderators
SS

Sally Shipman Wentworth

Vice President, Global Policy Development, Internet Society

Speakers

Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Celtic (Palais)

9:00am

One size does NOT fit all: Diverse threat models across North Africa call for more refined digital security training and tools
This session will provide a platform for grassroots activists - facing distinctly different digital threats across North Africa - to highlight their need for more tailored and context specific digital security training and tools. While digital security becomes an increasingly talked about and important part of human rights protection, and new training opportunities and tools become widespread, grassroots human rights groups across North Africa still struggle to access resources that are tailored to their precise needs. This panel will allow frontline groups to delve into the threat models they operate within, and share their digital security needs with the larger human rights technology community.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Bahaa Nasr

Bahaa Nasr

Information Security Manager, ISC Project


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Elyssa (Laico)

9:00am

How you can start using data analytics to grow your organizations impact and resources...tomorrow!
The first step in becoming a data-informed organization is undertaking a few data analysis projects. These first projects can often be very hard due to a lack of data, familiarity with tools, and technical training. Yet, these first projects are critical to becoming truly data-informed. The goal of this workshop is to put participants (and their organizations) on a direct path to successful first data projects by (1) demystifying data analysis for the participants and (2) helping them develop a concrete action plan that enables them achieve impactful data analysis on a specific problem using tools, staff, and data their organizations already have. The workshop begins with a brief discussion of what data collection and analysis is and how it is done. the goal is to demonstrate how high value analysis doesn't need to be technically complex. Discussion then focuses on how data analysis supports assessment of impact and efficiency. Emphasis is placed on how framing concrete analysis questions. Finally, we cover entry-level analysis tools (including Excel) used to conduct high-value analysis. Throughout the workshop, participants work through an interactive, collaborative exercise to identify and develop a detailed data analysis plan to support a specific analysis need in their organization.

Moderators
avatar for Derek Ruths

Derek Ruths

Chief Architect, Charitable Analytics International
Derek Ruths is co-founder of CAI, a charity focused on bringing the power of data science to social good initiatives. He is also Associate Professor of Computer Science at McGill University, and the Director of the McGill Centre for Social and Cultural Data Science. In these capacities... Read More →

Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Adean (Palais)

9:00am

Reverse-Engineering an RFP: Making Beneficiaries the Boss
A reverse-engineered design sprint in which the "users" at the core of "user-centered design" principles define how a foreign assistance program would be designed and implemented if their needs and interests took top priority rather than the needs or interests of an INGO or donor.

Moderators
Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Dougga (Laico)

9:00am

Changing practices of internet manipulation
(1) Changing practices of internet manipulation: Each of the African experts quickly give an input on what has changed in their respective country/region in terms of internet manipulation. The focus here really is on HOW the practices have changed (2) Legal implications: Both country/legal experts quickly reflect on what these changes mean for the violation of digital rights (3) Challenges for Disclosure: The technical experts discuss what these changes imply for measuring/disclosing practices of internet manipulation. (4) Outlook/Solutions: Together, we discuss what parallels we find across countries, how to tackle new challenges and how to create synergies.

Moderators
avatar for Lisa Garbe

Lisa Garbe

Research associate, University of St.Gallen
Our research team maps and analyzes all African ISPs and their shareholders; ISP involvement in shutdowns; and consequences thereof

Speakers
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is the ​Founder and executive director of the Digital Rights Foundation (DRF), Pakistan, She has run the DRF since it was established in 2012, and has been a practicing lawyer since 2007, where she worked on civil​,​ criminal​ and now cyber​ litigation... Read More →
avatar for Arthur Gwagwa

Arthur Gwagwa

Senior Research Fellow, Strathmore University (CIPIT)
Arthur is currently working on a project funded by the Open Technology Fund. The project will detect, document, and analyze current and emerging cyber threats with a long term goal to mitigate their impact on users at risk in specific Sub-Saharan African countries especially around... Read More →
avatar for Rigobert Kenmogne

Rigobert Kenmogne

Digital Rights Program Officer for francophnone Africa, Paradigm Initiative
Rigobert works with Paradigm Initiative as a Digital Rights Advocacy Program Officer for Francophone Africa with an office in Cameroon. Prior to this position, Rigobert Kenmogne worked as Google Policy Fellow for the same organization in this part of Africa. He is a Cameroonian webjournalist... Read More →
avatar for Alp Toker

Alp Toker

Executive Director, NetBlocks
Alp is founder of the netblocks.org digital rights initiative and award-winning Turkey Blocks collective, and Sakharov Fellow for Freedom of Thought with the European Parliament. He works on freedom of expression online, digital transparency and policy tooling for internet governance... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Oya 3 (Laico)

9:00am

Connecting for Inclusion: The devil is in the detail!
The challenge of connecting the next 3 billion internet users is not just about providing infrastructure, it is also about privacy, safety online, and online content. With this session, we bring three people who are in one way or another trying to connect people to the internet and help them stay connected.  

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Chenai Chair

Chenai Chair

Research Manager: Gender and Digital Rights, World Wide Web Foundation
RIA conducts public-interest research on ICT policy and regulation that responds to national, regional and continental needs. We work based on building a repository of African based evidence for policy making. I currently focus on research to policy communications, gender and internet... Read More →
avatar for Erik Hersman

Erik Hersman

CEO, BRCK
CEO of BRCK, where we’re creating the on-ramp for affordable internet in Africa called Moja. Also the Co-founder of Ushahidi and founder of the iHub.


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Caspian (Palais)

9:00am

The Palestinian Cause for Digital Freedom
This session will focus on internal and external challenges and threats to Palestinian digital freedom. On one side it will discuss legislative measures implemented by the different governmental actors and on-governmental actors, in particular social media companies such as facebook. These different actors threatened and infringe on digital freedoms of Palestinians in different ways with varying methods. At the same time, there's similarities, not only in intentions but also ramifications, which will be discussed in this session.


Thursday June 13, 2019 9:00am - 10:15pm
Leptis (Laico)

10:30am

Dynamics of Doing Research in Closed Societies: What we can learn from audience research from online exiled media
This Session is intended to foster collaboration between researchers in the fields of media assistance and digital rights. Based on recent work done by the session organizer in several "closed societies", there remains a significant need to better understand risk and security practices when it comes to doing research in high risk environments. There has long been an overlap between digital rights/ internet freedom work and independent media assistance programs, but there continues to be a disconnect between the two sectors. For researchers working to support either sector, the challenges of doing research in closed environments presents many challenges as well as opportunities. During the session, we will share information about the research projects we are working on, including sharing information about research design, data quality, methodology, digital security practices, and tools and platforms we use in our research efforts. This session will bring together researchers, monitoring and evaluation professionals, internet freedom activists, and media development experts to look at an interesting intersection of the digital rights/ internet freedom community and the media development/ press freedom community.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Abbott

Susan Abbott

Independent Consultant
Susan Abbott is an independent consultant who specializes in working with non-profit organizations, universities, and donors in the areas of media development, civil society assistance, and digital rights. Abbott provides consulting services in the areas of fundraising and grant... Read More →

Speakers
MH

Maria Hrimech

Head of MENA region, Conflict Management Consulting (CMC)
AN

Ashley Noia

Country Director, IREX


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
L'Escale (Laico)

10:30am

Do Our Faces Deserve the Same Protection as Our Phones? Regulation and governance of facial recognition technology
In July 2018, Microsoft shared its call for government regulation and responsible industry governance of facial recognition technology. This technology clearly brings important societal benefits, but we recognize the risks which need broader study and discussion. We’ve been pursuing these issues with technologists, civil society, academics and policymakers to expand our understanding of the risks, including in the contexts of bias, privacy and surveillance, and to develop our 6 principles to manage our development and use of facial recognition. We believe there are three problems that governments need to address: 1. Certain uses of facial recognition technology increase the risk of decisions and outcomes that are biased. 2. The widespread use of this technology can lead to new intrusions into privacy. 3. The use of facial recognition technology by a government or law enforcement for mass surveillance can harm democratic freedoms. All three of these problems should be addressed through legislation by requiring transparency, enabling third part testing, ensuring meaningful human review, avoiding the use for unlawful discrimination, ensuring notice, clarifying consent, and limiting on-going government surveillance of specified individuals.

Moderators
avatar for Steve Crown

Steve Crown

Deputy General Counsel, Human Rights, Microsoft
UNGPs. HRIAs. Artificial Intelligence and Human Rights.

Speakers

Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Oya 1 (Laico)

10:30am

Rights and Ethics: When technology knows how you feel
A workshop to explore the ethical considerations and practices for technology that is ‘empathic’: able to measure, simulate or respond to emotions and other internal human states. Artificial intelligence systems that can determine your feelings based on signals such as facial expression, voice and internal physiology like heart rate, are now in major demand from tech companies, governments and others. The empathic interaction promised by these systems has great potential either to contribute to human flourishing, or apply subtle manipulations to exploit us. Workshop participants will: Gain an understanding of the current tools and processes for measuring and responding to human states. Analyse some scenarios for positive and negative outcomes. Discuss human rights in the context of empathic artificial intelligence. Discuss what practical measures can be taken to ensure ethical use of this technology. Together we will consider issues including: algorithmic bias, emotional nudging, the role of emotions in decision-making, as well as practical applications within health, safety, entertainment and more.

Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Hannibal (Laico)

10:30am

"Challenge Hate” - Countering “hate speech” against LGBTQ people in MENA
“Challenge Hate” - Countering “hate speech” against LGBTQ people in MENA is a report that presents conclusions and observations from monitoring public discourse about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people in Bahrain, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, and Tunisia, using illustrative case studies drawn from the period 2011 to 2017. The nature of public discourse in the target countries is worrying, as narratives around sexual orientation and gender identity, as well as sexual and gender expression, are largely dominated and therefore shaped by cisgendered heterosexual men. “Hate speech” against persons on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity was observed in all five countries, reflecting and reinforcing legal, political, social, cultural and economic discrimination, which in all cases could be characterized as institutionalized and systemic. Also, Media coverage of LGBTQ people, though sparse, was almost always negative, employing derogatory or inaccurate language to describe LGBTQ people. Although online spaces have afforded LGBTQ people degrees of anonymity allowing them to access and share information and form relationships in ways that were previously impossible, these spaces also carry significant discrimination and violence against LGBTQ people, recorded and shared online, creating public outrage supportive of LGBTQ people.

Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Amilcar (Laico)

10:30am

Imagine an Internet Free From Hate...It’s Easy If You Try: A strategy workshop on combating gender-based hate speech online
Opening with two 5-minute lightning talks by IT for Change and InternetLab on their reflections about the contextual manifestations and key challenges of addressing gender-based hate speech online in India and Brazil, this session seeks to catalyse an open brainstorming and an informed and engaged multistakeholder dialogue amongst participants, to strengthen our collective understanding on the following issues: a. Mapping the specific gaps in current knowledge about how intersecting gender and social prejudice in different contexts leads to specific manifestations of online hate speech and identification of areas for future research in this domain b. Exchange of ideas on legal, policy and community action, to address this issue, including: - overhaul of legal frameworks (How can pre-digital laws on gender-based violence as well as digital rights tackle the issue?) - articulation of the roles and responsibilities of Internet intermediaries (How can social media platforms step up context-sensitive application of global community standards?) We solicit participation from all stakeholders - civil society actors, representatives of Internet intermediaries, technical community members, and also government officials.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Thiago Oliva

Thiago Oliva

Head of Research, InternetLab
Thiago Dias Oliva is a Ph.D. student in International Law at the University of São Paulo and head of research on freedom of expression at InternetLab, an independent research center based in São Paulo, Brazil. Thiago holds a master degree in Human Rights (2015) from the same university... Read More →
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab
CC-Brazil coordinator and GNC representative.I am also the director of InternetLab, where I do research around human rights and the Internet; Internet regulation; Gender and Tech; Access to knowledge and Copyright.


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Adean (Palais)

10:30am

Moderate Bias? Exploring anti-bias training in the context of online content moderation
Unconscious bias has a powerful impact on individuals in any work environment, but the magnitude, frequency and velocity of the decisions made every day by individuals responsible for content moderation on social media or gaming platforms increases that impact many times over. ADL will bring its experts on anti-bias education to the table with the tech and human rights community to explore the application of anti-bias education concepts in the context of online content moderation in an effort to shape thinking around a form of anti-bias training aimed specifically at content moderators of online platforms.

Moderators
avatar for Daniel Kelley

Daniel Kelley

Associate Director, Center for Technology and Society, ADL
Ensuring justice and fair treatment to all in digital environments. Challenging hate, bias and harassment in games, the game community and the game industry.

Speakers
NS

Nicola Straker

Education Director, NY/NJ, ADL


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Carthage 2 (Laico)

10:30am

Data Trusts: Getting beyond the hype
Participants will gain an understanding of what data trusts are and the problems they can potentially solve. Participants should also expect a discussion on the benefits of viewing data trusts as a form of private law regulation and fiduciary governance that is capable of adapting to the speed of technological innovation. The possible role for government and public institutions in creating an enabling environment for data trusts, in particular, regarding the need to endow citizens with digital rights and responsibilities that support their operation will also be evaluated. The session will explore the conditions under which data trusts can provide individuals with a greater measure of control over their personal data; create transparency regarding data transactions; increase access to data and foster innovation; address asymmetries of knowledge and power that exist between corporations, the government and individuals; and enhance the protection of individual privacy and other human rights. The Session will draw on concrete examples of data trust creation, including Sidewalk Labs’ proposal to use a civic data trust as part of their smart city development in the City of Toronto, to provide participants with an analysis of data trust’s potential benefits and shortcomings.

Moderators
avatar for Philip Dawson

Philip Dawson

Lead, Public Policy, Element AI
Philip Dawson is Public Policy Lead at Element AI, where he works with governments and partner organizations to develop policies for artificial intelligence that empower the public and foster responsible economic growth. Reach out to discuss collaboration around privacy, data protection... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sean McDonald

Sean McDonald

Co-Founder, Digital Public
Sean McDonald is a co-founder of Digital Public, a public interest data governance firm. Digital Public pioneered Civic Data Trusts – legal frameworks that enable groups to build fiduciary, purpose-driven management of the rights to data, code, and other digital assets. He's also... Read More →
avatar for Sylvie Delacroix

Sylvie Delacroix

Professor in Law and Ethics, U. of Birmingham and Alan Turing Institute
Challenging the ‘one size fits all’, feudal approach to data gov.: bottom up data trusts can not only empower us to choose among different approaches to data gov., switch trust when needed. can also facilitate access to pre-authorised, disparate datasets: https://papers.ssrn... Read More →
avatar for Mark Surman

Mark Surman

Executive Director, Mozilla Foundation
The web is one of our most valuable public resources — it’s Mark Surman’s job to protect it. Mark serves as Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation, a global community that does everything from making Firefox to taking stands on issues like online privacy. Mark’s biggest... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Biscay (Palais)

10:30am

Coffee and Democracy: Let's talk about the EU elections results and what it means for digital rights
Come join us with your coffee for a chat about elections, democracy and human rights defenders, we will provide the cookies :) The session will be a casual chat between the three policy staff of the Access Now Brussels team discussing the results and impact of the EU elections which takes place on May 24-26. We seek active participation of the audience to hear from experiences from different regions. With the rise of populism in the EU and around the world, civil society increasingly has to operate in restrictive environments and adapt its work to not only advance human rights and protect users but also to fight for its existence.

Speakers
avatar for Fanny Hidvégi

Fanny Hidvégi

European Policy Manager, Access Now
Fanny (@infofannny) is Access Now’s European Policy Manager based in Brussels. Previously, Fanny was International Privacy Fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. where she focused on E.U.-U.S. data transfers. For three years Fanny led the Freedom... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Jelsa (Laico)

10:30am

Separating human rights activism from regime change
This session promotes reflection by activists on how their efforts risk being co-opted by nation states pursuing regime change. Panelists will review ways that governments have used civil society activism to advance geopolitical goals (in state-to-state rivalry.) Then participants will discuss whether that background relates to today's experiences. The first part, on deep background, is multidimensional. It will be historical (e.g. examples of "political warfare" dating back to the Trojan War,) conceptual (e.g. notions of "unconventional warfare," "protest potential," "strategic narratives," etc.), and political (episodes of Internet-empowered activism that led to regime change but not to obvious increases in democracy.) In the second part, attendees will be invited to relate these histories and concepts to their own experiences or to those of their peers. Activists may explore whether today's situations bear any resemblance to past experiences and, if so, what that means for practice. The goal of the session is to make human rights activism more effective in achieving its goals of advancing human rights, social justice, and good governance.

Moderators
avatar for Hans Klein

Hans Klein

Georgia Tech
Internet governance, democracy promotion, propaganda.

Speakers

Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Cyrene (Laico)

10:30am

Political Ads on Social Networks: Tearing the curtains of opacity
At the beginning of the session, each member of the organizations will present (in 10 minutes) the advances in their research on political advertising in social networks according to points of contact to facilitate the subsequent exchange: 1) Analysis methodology implemented. 2) Obstacles in the investigation of electoral advertising in social networks. 3) Cooperation with the public and private sector: if it happened and how it happened. In the following part of the session, the moderator will summarize the state of affairs and invite the attendees to share questions and proposals to continue moving forward in the research and transparency of political advertising on social networks. We would also like to have the participation of the platforms where these practices take place. We´ll try to manage those invitations successfully before the session, but we still can not confirm them. We expect participants to adopt a proactive mindset towards sharing their own experiences and points of view in this field.

Moderators
avatar for Leandro Ucciferri

Leandro Ucciferri

Policy Analyst, Asociación por los Derechos Civiles
I'm a lawyer, policy analyst and researcher working at the Association for Civil Rights (ADC in Spanish), a not-for-profit, independent, NGO founded in 1995, based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. My work focuses mostly on privacy issues. https://leandro.im

Speakers
avatar for Bruna Santos

Bruna Santos

Policy and Advocacy analyst, Coding Rights
I have a BA in Law and work as a Policy and Advocacy analyst at Coding Rights, with a special focus on Data Protection, Human Rights in the Digital Age and Internet Governance. Additionally, I also hold the position of Chair of the Non-Commercial Users Constituency (NCUC) at ICAN... Read More →
NM

Nathalie Maréchal

Senior research analyst, Ranking Digital Rights
Corporate transparency & accountability; surveillance capitalism; targeted advertising business models; artificial intelligence & human rights
avatar for Varoon Bashyakarla

Varoon Bashyakarla

Data Scientist, Tactical Tech
Varoon Bashyakarla is a data scientist at the Tactical Technology Collective, a Berlin-based NGO that works globally at the intersection of civil society and technology. For the past two years, he has been studying how personal data is becoming a political asset, influencing elections... Read More →
avatar for Natalia Zuazo

Natalia Zuazo

Associate Investigator, ADC
Political scientist specialized in tecnology. Journalist & author (Guerras de internet + Los dueños de internet). Associate investigator at ADC Argentina. Director of SALTO technnopolitical agency.


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Elyssa (Laico)

10:30am

Tackling Takedowns: Building platform transparency and accountability
While debates continue about the standards that platforms should use for content moderation, there is broad agreement on the need for greater transparency and due process mechanisms. These include the Santa Clara principles, as well as more specific proposals on transparency and the building of institutions to bolster due process, such as a social media council, and Facebook's proposals for an oversight board and/or a "Supreme Court" to adjudicate takedowns. While overall pressure has led to some improvements, we need a broader strategy to force change. The organizers will circulate a paper with key proposals and questions ahead of the session, with the aim of identifying their strengths and weaknesses. The session will inform groups working in this space, and begin the process of developing at least some principles for civil society's approach to these issues.

Moderators
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Faiza Patel

Faiza Patel

Co-Director, Liberty & National Security Program, Brennan Center for Justice
Faiza Patel serves as co-director of the Brennan Center’s Liberty and National Security Program, where she specializes in issues relating to counter-terrorism, surveillance and Islamophobia. She is a frequent commentator for media outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Dougga (Laico)

10:30am

Technological fictions and feminist futures
New technologies function as narrations of a better society. Simultaneously, they are articulations of structures of power that demonstrate how societies handle physical realities. What happens if one provokes those narrations and tries to influence futures of technologies through feminist theories? In our workshop we aim to observe, critique, and re-narrate futures of the internet. By acknowledging the power of imagination in the formulation of technologies we aim to hack and redefine those narrations. We first assess the current state of the internet and analyse where we find patriarchal, capitalist and/or social inequalities. Then, we discuss how responses to those structures of power can look like. In small groups we investigate how an alternative narration could look like in a feminist context. Outcome of each group is a feminist short story of an alternative internet that advocates for digital human rights. By using narration as a cultural practice we aim to shed new light on current debates about a feminist internet and the formulation of technologies. To imagine those futures and to write alternative stories is not only a way to discuss social structures of power, but also to actively shape those futures from a feminist standpoint.

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Fritsch

Katrin Fritsch

Co-Founder, MOTIF Institute for Digital Culture
technology + culture, feminist science fiction, narratives of technologies, sustainability, strategy, data + society


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Limes (Laico)

10:30am

One Cross-Border Treaty to Rule Them All: The Budapest Convention Protocol
The U.S. CLOUD Act permits countries with which the U.S. strikes a bilateral agreement to make direct surveillance demands on U.S. providers, and gives the U.S. reciprocal authority to make demands on the providers in the other country. The EU's E-Evidence regulation and directive will require companies doing business in the EU to appoint a representative to receive surveillance demands issued by any EU country. But, these are limited bi-lateral and regional approaches. This session will introduce you to a more global approach: the Council of Europe's new Protocol to the Budapest Cybercrime Convention. It is expected to facilitate direct demands from each signatory around the globe to communications service providers in other signatory states. There are only limited opportunities for stakeholders to weigh in and express their views on the Budapest Convention Protocol. One of those opportunities is coming this summer, right after RightsCon. Only a few civil society organisations have participated thus far in consultations around the Protocol. This Fishbowl event aims to change that, and equip more stakeholders -- particularly in civil society organisations -- to participate in consultations around the Protocol.

Moderators
avatar for Greg Nojeim

Greg Nojeim

Director, Project on Freedom, Security and Technology, Center for Democracy & Technology
Cybersecurity, surveillance, United States surveillance laws, ECPA, cross border law enforcement demands for Internet users' communications, encryption

Speakers
avatar for Cindy Cohn

Cindy Cohn

Executive Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
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Robyn Greene

Privacy Policy Manager, Law Enforcement Access and Data Protection, Facebook, Inc.
I am so excited to be attending my second RightsCon this year. I joined Facebook's privacy policy team in February to work on law enforcement access and data protection issues. This includes issues like surveillance and other data access laws, cross border data request processes... Read More →
avatar for Dennys Antonialli

Dennys Antonialli

Executive Director, InternetLab
Dennys Antonialli is the Executive Director of InternetLab, a think tank on internet law and policy based in São Paulo, Brazil. Between 2017 and 2018, Dennys was a Professor of Law at the Department of Public Law of the University of São Paulo Faculty of Law (USP), where he also... Read More →
avatar for Etienne Maury

Etienne Maury

Legal and policy officer, CNIL (French Data Protection Authority)
Etienne began his career in European public affairs in Brussels and became in 2009 parliamentary advisor to a Member of the European Parliament. From 2013 to 2017, Etienne was a group policy advisor for the committee on civil liberties, justice and home affairs in the European Parliament... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Elydhafa (Laico)

10:30am

Defending Encryption: Lessons from the Australian frontline
In 2018, Australia passed legislation that provides far-reaching powers to law enforcement to break into encrypted communication systems.  Despite hard work and campaigning from many in civil society in Australia, we lost this fight. We were out-maneuverer, out-flanked and out-gunned. This session will be presented by two people working together from different organisations which were part of the civil society community in Australia fighting this law. The law has crossed dangerous boundaries into backdooring encryption; all eyes were on Australia in the lead up to the dramatic final hours of Parliament’s final 2018 sitting. The Bill became trapped between two houses of Parliament, with federal ministers throwing terrorism taunts, amid political brinksmanship on national security.


This talk is a story and a journey – to figure out how we could have done it better. We want to take the you on that journey. While this is a battle lost, the war is still in play. We talk about how this new law, which may soon be facing a review, may soon impact on other countries’ digital freedoms.

Speakers
avatar for Suelette	Dreyfus

Suelette Dreyfus

Executive Director, Blueprint for Free Speech
I circle the protections around the journalist-source relationship via technology, law, policy, education, practice and research. My other hat is as an Academic Specialist in the School of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne.
avatar for Lizzie O'Shea

Lizzie O'Shea

Board members, Digital Rights Watch
Digital Rights Watch Australia


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Village Stage (Laico)

10:30am

Lightning Talks: User experience and access in closed societies
How to make a revolution with internet tools: experience of the Armenian revolution (ArmSec Foundation)

Description: During the Velvet revolution in Armenia (April 2018) the main driver of the protests were the youth, young activists, geeks. People used a lot of net tools to make a protests decentralized, to combat state propaganda, to combat state propaganda trolls attacks in social networks. Activists used specific tools like super-chats in Telegram to maintain distributed protests, special Google Chrome extensions to distinguish media sources and social media profiles and detect propaganda and trolls, Facebook lives to break propaganda lies etc. The possibilities to make a bridge between online and offline in the aggressive environment attacks by state will be provided. During the talk a lot of tools and tactics will be presented which are proved in action to be useful for activists during the protests.

Speaker: Samvel Martirosyan

When it doubt, go digital: Online networks in unfree spaces (DCN)

Description: In Eastern Europe, legislators are not our friends: the freedom is shrinking even online. Yet, there is a way around it. By building digital communities for professionals across sectors, we've managed to do joint projects together both offline and online and help activists in repressed societies. How are we doing that? Come and hear about our experience with Digital Communication Network, which unites 5,000+ tech and media professionals working together. During our talk, we'll share some insights on connecting startups and media makers, working on media sustainability, and helping civil society activists reach greater audiences online by joint training programs. In addition, we'll talk of media literacy efforts and digital influencers in the region, and how these are shaping media landscape in Eastern and Central Europe. Come if you want to know more about the way journos, activists, and techies work together in not so democratic societies, and how our digital work is shaping the region. If you want to learn more about Eastern and Central Europe, stop by as well. We'll be focusing on cross-sectoral aspects, handling money, using social media, & being present while staying digital, and we want to hear about your experience, too.

Speaker: Anna Romandash & Franak Viacorka

Speak my language, or I will hate digital hygiene! (Spectrum, a French based queer feminist NGO)

Description: This is the story of Iranian Rainbow, a project launched in April 2018 to fill up the gap of digital hygiene awareness among the Persian speaking queer community. Iranian.lgbt is offering lessons and awareness to the LGBTQIA+ community, but not like any other digital security training, using comic strips, podcasts broadcasted online and offline, story telling, Persona creation, Instagram lives and more.

Speaker: Soudeh Rad

Creating effective multilingual e-learning experiences for activists in closed societies (Advocacy Assembly)

Description: In this session, the team behind the multilingual digital training platform Advocacy Assembly share tips on how they created a localized e-learning experience in three languages. With a focus on teaching digital security, online campaigning, data skills and more, we will discuss how our approach improved the overall user experience, expanded our audience of Arabic and Persian-speaking activists and advocates, and supported them to complete course materials. We will explain how our user research helped us to localize social media assets, blogs and most importantly, e-learning training materials to create a rapidly-growing platform. The discussion will centre around the challenges encountered when adapting content to activists in different contexts – some relating to technical difficulties, and others to cultural and political sensitivities. This session is for organizations who conduct face-to-face trainings to support activists in hard-to-reach contexts globally. It’s especially useful for those who are interested in developing and delivering training content to activists and advocates working in closed societies.

Speaker: Tara Kelly

Speakers
avatar for Anna Romandash

Anna Romandash

Community Manager, Digital Communication Network
Anna Romandash works with Digital Communication Network, 4,000+ community of journalists and media professionals from CEE/CA. She works on projects dealing with media freedom and freedom of expression in the region. Anna has been named Media Freedom Ambassador for Ukraine in 2015... Read More →
TK

Tara Kelly

Advocacy Assembly


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
The BeeHive (Palais)

10:30am

Queering the Resistance: Movement building across digital terrain
The political moment globally is defined by the heightened criminalization of queer and trans people of color, women and migrants, growing nationalism and fundamentalism, and shrinking space for civil society. Surveillance and states’ increasing use of tech to control public narratives puts activists at risk. Astraea embarked on research in key geographies around the world to: understand the baseline for tech use, governance and access; explore the dynamics of internet freedom, digital security and surveillance; map the communications and digital organizing tools being used by activists and the role of digital advocacy and online community-building in their movements; and identify opportunities around tech and communications tools that activists can use to mitigate threats and further their work. We will share key insights from 4 digital landscape mappings, drawing connections across political and movement contexts in the U.S., Dominican Republic, India, and Central Asia and Eastern Europe. Via interactive discussion with panelists and audience, this session will share critical knowledge about the particular vulnerabilities that queer and trans activists experience on digital terrain, and identify how technologists and funders can better support their resilience and resistance.

Moderators
avatar for J. Bob Alotta

J. Bob Alotta

Executive Director, Astraea Foundation
Filmmaker and technologist turned Executive Director, J. Bob Alotta leads the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, an LGBTQI rights foundation working for social, racial, gender, and economic justice around the globe. Through film and at Astraea, Bob engages philanthropists, leaders... Read More →

Speakers

Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Caspian (Palais)

10:30am

The Network of Internet & Society Centers Information Quality Meetup
The Network of Internet & Society Centers (NoC, https://networkofcenters.net) is a network of almost 100 Internet and society centers around the world. As many NoC representatives attend RightsCon, we hope that by hosting this meetup NoC representatives can (re)connect and new people can join the conversation. The meetup is envisioned as a highly engaging, participatory, and somewhat gamified encounter. The idea for the meetup is inspired by a cards-based activity designed at the Berkman Klein Center (bit.ly/iqcards1). In short time intervals, meetup participants are encouraged to find someone with a stack of cards and have them introduce their project using the card as a basis for the conversation. Those receiving cards will be able to keep them and invited to reconnect with those they spoke to during the conference, opening opportunities for channels of collaboration.

Moderators
avatar for Sandra Cortesi

Sandra Cortesi

Director of Youth and Media, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University
Children and young people

Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Celtic (Palais)

10:30am

Meet the Funders: An OTR Q&A with donors
As the Internet freedom space has evolved, so too have the donors supporting this work. This “speed dating” session is an opportunity for current and potential grantees to meet with a variety of donors to ask questions, raise concerns, and learn more about their funding priorities and processes.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Blah

Dan Blah

Co-Founder, Open Technology Fund
avatar for Michael Brennan

Michael Brennan

Program Officer, Ford Foundation
Michael Brennan is the technology program officer on the Internet Freedom team at Ford Foundation where he oversees a global portfolio of grantees that address open Internet issues through a technical lens. He also designed and manages the Foundation's technology fellows program... Read More →
AD

Amalia Deloney

Program Director, Media Democracy Fund
avatar for Bryan Nunez

Bryan Nunez

Program Officer, Technology and Human Rights, Open Society Foundations


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Carthage 1 (Laico)

10:30am

Know Thy Enemy: Narrative framing, storytelling, and tech in the disinformation age
From synthetic media to audience research on the effectiveness of human rights messages to the "dos and don'ts" of framing, Know Thy Enemy will act as a primer on fighting disinformation. In particular, the session will address three key ingredients in the disinformation campaigner's "recipe book"— narrative framing, tech manipulation, and message spread—while highlighting the successful steps that some organizations are taking to address the phenomenon more effectively.

Know Thy Enemy will explore common issues civil society organizations face with regard to disinformation. It will include time for attendees to raise issues their organization is facing with regard to disinformation, as well as time to brainstorm with panelists about how to address those issues. This session will be especially helpful to organizational communications representatives, media/storytelling strategists, and anyone interested in developing strategic narratives.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Braithwaite

Michael Braithwaite

Director of Narrative Strategy, New Media Advocacy Project
A writer by trade, Michael has worked as a freelance journalist, fundraiser, and for more than ten years, as a communications professional. She's interested in applying narrative change and media theory to human rights, LGBTQ rights, gender equality/equity, and youth advocacy. Michael... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory

Program Director, WITNESS
In short....video, human rights, citizen participation, role of companies, AI and deep fakes/content moderation, live video and experiential activismIn long...Sam Gregory is Program Director of WITNESS (www.witness.org), which supports anyone anywhere to use video and technology to... Read More →
avatar for Liba Beyer

Liba Beyer

Director Global Campaigns, Human Rights Watch
I lead Human Rights Watch's digital advocacy campaigning and a host of other public engagement initiatives including a persuasion lab to move hearts and minds on human rights values, social media ad buy & ethics R&D for human rights, evaluating impact in communications and audience... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Oya 2 (Laico)

10:30am

Who said What to Whom? Disinformation and anonymous speech
Join a discussion about how speech gets weaponized. In this session, Brittan Heller will interview speakers about what disinformation is, how it functions and permeates through online spaces, and what role bots, trolls, and the media play in this process. What is the role of anonymous speech in the promotion, spread, and functioning of disinformation? What is the difference between misinformation, disinformation, propaganda and rumor? How do forms of online speech like trolling, harassment, hate speech, and media manipulation intersect with these phenomena? The highlight of this talk will be a discussion about how anonymity functions within disinformation ecosystems -- and what this means for proponents of freedom of expression. Oftentimes, anonymous speech is a polarizing issue for online communities. It is either considered to be essential for protecting activists, dissidents, and journalists -- or a primary driver in the targeting of minority voices. This talk will approach the topic of anonymous speech, as it relates to misinformation, by grounding it in the speakers' research on bots, harassment, hate speech.

Moderators
avatar for Brittan Heller

Brittan Heller

Senior Associate, Human Rights Initiative, CSIS
Brittan Heller works at the intersection of technology, human rights, and the law, and is an expert on content moderation and the movement from online conduct to offline violence. She is the founder of the Center for Digital Civil Rights, an innovation lab for human and civil rights... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Katie Joseff

Katie Joseff

Research Manager, Digital Intelligence Lab at Institute for the Future
Katie Joseff is the research manager of the Digital Intelligence Lab at Institute for the Future (IFTF). She works with Sam Woolley investigating computational propaganda-- the use of automation, disinformation, and algorithms to manipulate public opinion online-- and the ethical... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am
Leptis (Laico)

10:30am